Tag Archives: Language learning

Teaching with Technology Innovators Series: As Easy As ABC: Digital Humanities in the Classroom

Topic: As Easy as ABC: Digital Humanities in the Classroom
Speakers: Bill (William) Gleason (Professor & Chair, Department of English), Andrea Immel (Curator, Costsen Children’s Library), Ben Johnston (Manager, Humanities Resource Center, OIT), Clifford Wulfman (Coordinator, Library Digital Initiatives)

Time: Tuesday, April 29, 4:30pm – 6:00pm
Location: 330 Frist Campus Center, McGraw Center Conference Room

Refreshments will be provided! To register for this session: http://bit.ly/TT-ABC
(Registration is not required for attendance, however refreshments may be limited.)

The collaborators behind the new Interactive Digital Archive of Rare ABC Books, featuring selections from the Cotsen Children’s Library, will discuss the vision, planning, and work of the project, which was supported with a course development grant from the Digital Humanities Initiative and has been integrated into ENG 385: Children’s Literature. They will also describe a special course component in which students receive training in the methods and materials of the digital humanities, including text encoding.

Bill Gleason is Professor and Chair of the Department of English. A specialist in American literature and culture, his research and teaching interests range from the 18th century to the present, with particular emphasis on the late 19th/early 20th century, and include popular culture, material culture, environmental studies, and the history of the book.

Andrea Immel, Curator of the Cotsen Children’s Library since 1995, organizes international conferences, gallery and virtual exhibitions, and acquires materials for the collection.  She contributed chapters to volumes 5 and 6 of the Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, and co-edited Childhood and Children’s Books in Early Modern Europe, and the Cambridge Companion to Children’s Literature.

Ben Johnston is manager of OIT’s Humanities Resource Center in East Pyne.  Since 2005, Ben has worked with Princeton educators, students, and researchers across the Humanities and Social Sciences to facilitate the use of digital assets, technology tools, databases, and digital video in teaching and research. Ben is also an active member of Princeton Digital Humanities Initiative.

Clifford Wulfman is coordinator of Library Digital Initiatives and Director of the Blue Mountain Project. In addition to many years’ experience with text encoding, Cliff has published numerous articles on topics in the digital humanities and is co-author, with Robert Scholes, of Modernism in the Magazines: An Introduction.


The Productive Scholar RECAP: New Faculty Technology Toolkit – Part 1: Q-APS Consulting, HRC, and DHI

For a description of this Productive Scholar session and biographies of the presenters, please click here.

Jonathan Olmsted, Q-APS Consulting: Using the Q-APS Consulting Service
Q-APS: the Program for Quantitative and Analytical Political Science, originated in the Department of Politics. The program was started in 2009 to support the intersection of political science and technical fields such as statistics, game theory, and computer science. Q-APS has sponsored a weekly seminar series, conferences, workshops, and the provision of graduate student support (e.g.: LaTeX, R, webscraping, research computing).Screen shot 2013-11-22 at 5.57.07 PM

A little more than a year old, the Q-APS Consulting Service seeks to provide service to members of the social science community (faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, and staff researchers) free of charge. More recently, a growing number of researchers have become interested in how statistics and research computing technologies can fruitfully intersect with other fields. As a result, Q-APS Consulting Services has found themselves being visited by scholars from these other fields. In some cases these scholars are attempting to determine what significance Q-APS research methods might have for them. One example of a question asked during an initial consultation is, “How do I use data, or computers, or math to answer my social science question?” Frequently consulting requests include, but are not limited to, the following topics:
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Free German to English Online Dictionary

dict_cc_logo.pngA simple German to English dictionary (and English to German) called dict.cc is a great resource tool for students studying German. I noticed this tool was being used by one of our student workers and she said a friend of her’s that studied German recommended it to her. There is even a section called Vocab Trainer that has sets of public vocab lists you can run through. The site even has a Firefox add-on that has a feature to allow you to “quick translate” words on a webpage.

To start using dict.cc click on the link below:


Free FSI Language Courses

fsi_logo.pngThe Foreign Service Institute has made their language courses public domain on the Internet. This is a great resource that provides audio and text material for a wide variety of languages (even for languages like Sinhala and Yoruba, which are hard to find free resources for learning).

If you would like to see what languages and materials they have available, click on the link below:


List of Language Learning Materials that Are Free on the Internet

The Humanities Resource Center has put together a list of free online language learning materials that patrons can use to help them learn a new language. Most of the sites require you to create a user account. This list will be updated as new sites are launched. Click on the link below to view the list. Happy language learning!