Tag Archives: Language Technology

The Productive Scholar: Tools for Transcription

Topic: Tools for Transcription
Speaker: Ben Johnston, Senior Educational Technologist and Manager, Humanities Resource Center (HRC), OIT

Time: Thursday, November 14, 12:00PM
Location: HRC Classroom, Room 012 East Pyne, Lower Level

Digitizing the spoken and written word can be a very time-consuming but necessary part of doing research in the digital age. In this session we’ll discuss the features to look for in tools for transcribing audio, video, and textual sources, and about the tools commonly used used for this work. From dictation software to multi-lingual OCR, to software for doing time-encoded transcription of audio and video and cloud services for crowd-sourced transcription of books and manuscripts, this session aims to make the arduous task of transcription a little easier.

Ben Johnston is Senior Educational Technologist and Manager at OIT’s Humanities Resource Center (HRC) in East Pyne, and Consultant for the Digital Humanities Initiative (DHI). Ben has been involved with educational technology for over thirteen years in positions at Columbia University, Bryn Mawr College, and Princeton University. While at Princeton, Ben has worked with educators and researchers across the Humanities and Social Sciences to facilitate the use of digital assets, technology tools, databases, and digital video in teaching and research.

Download the presentation slides (.pptx)

The Productive Scholar RECAP: New Faculty Technology Toolkit – Part 1: Q-APS Consulting, HRC, and DHI

For a description of this Productive Scholar session and biographies of the presenters, please click here.

Jonathan Olmsted, Q-APS Consulting: Using the Q-APS Consulting Service
Q-APS: the Program for Quantitative and Analytical Political Science, originated in the Department of Politics. The program was started in 2009 to support the intersection of political science and technical fields such as statistics, game theory, and computer science. Q-APS has sponsored a weekly seminar series, conferences, workshops, and the provision of graduate student support (e.g.: LaTeX, R, webscraping, research computing).Screen shot 2013-11-22 at 5.57.07 PM

A little more than a year old, the Q-APS Consulting Service seeks to provide service to members of the social science community (faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, and staff researchers) free of charge. More recently, a growing number of researchers have become interested in how statistics and research computing technologies can fruitfully intersect with other fields. As a result, Q-APS Consulting Services has found themselves being visited by scholars from these other fields. In some cases these scholars are attempting to determine what significance Q-APS research methods might have for them. One example of a question asked during an initial consultation is, “How do I use data, or computers, or math to answer my social science question?” Frequently consulting requests include, but are not limited to, the following topics:
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Tech Spotlights: Audacity


Audacity (Photo credit: ppip)

This session focused on the voice recording software Audacity. Audacity is a freely available program for audio recording.  Follow the link below for instructions on downloading and using this software. The software is also available on all computers in the HRC.

AUDACITY Instructions.pdf



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Typing in Foreign Languages

typeit-logo.png If you have the need to type anything in a foreign language which has accents and other strange-looking
characters, and you only have a US keyboard,this website will make your life a whole lot easier!

Now, through the miracles of Unicode and JavaScript,
you can just navigate to this site, type whatever you need to type in a text box,
and then paste it wherever you need it — into your word processor, e-mail
message, etc.
You can type foreign characters by clicking buttons or by pressing intuitive
keyboard shortcuts (Ctrl+Letter). Now typing in French, German, Russian and many more languages is simple.


Grimm German Grammar

Grimm Grammar characters: The Bremer Travelling MusiciansFrom the University of Texas, Grimm Grammar uses classic Grimm Fairy Tales updated for the 21st century.  From the about page of the site:

The primary audience for Grimm Grammar is the beginning language learner.  Each part of speech – e.g., adjective, adverb, noun, verb – is introduced by a sectional overview, and then further explained in relevant, thoroughly cross-referenced sub-topics: e.g., articles, the past tense of regular verbs, etc.

Grammar descriptions in English/German and self-correcting exercises promote the understanding of grammar concepts through plausible communicative contexts – what someone might actually say in real life – using predominantly discourse-length language samples.