Tag Archives: media

The Productive Scholar: Risk in Media Discourse: An Introduction to Topic Modeling with R and Python

Topic: Risk in Media Discourse: An Introduction to Topic Modeling with R and Python461972367(1)
Speaker: Manish Nag

Time: Thursday, April 10, 12:00pm – 1:00pm
Location: New Media Center (NMC), 130 Lewis Library, First Floor

Lunch will be provided. To register for this session: http://bit.ly/Risk-TM
(Registration is not required for attendance, however refreshments may be limited.)

Amidst global concerns over financial markets, terrorism, and outbreaks of disease, the term “risk” pervades contemporary Western media discourse. Manish Nag’s dissertation is interested in the overall landscape of risk in contemporary news media discourse, using the full text of the New York Times from 1987-2006. What are the predominant threads of discourse related to risk, how does this discourse grow and change over time?  Manish’s presentation presents how topic modeling can be used to help answer these questions.

Manish Nag is a Doctoral Candidate in Sociology. His research seeks to understand the global landscape of media discourse on global risk, as well as change and resilience in global networks of people, goods and ideas. His research utilizes mapping, data visualization, the analysis of text, and social network analysis. Manish received his BA in Computer Science from Brown University, and has worked as a software engineer, entrepreneur, and manger prior to his graduate work.

Presentation co-sponsored with Digital Humanities Initiative at Princeton (DHI).

SmARThistory.org: Free Online Multi-media Web-book


“smARThistory.org is a free multi-media web-book designed as a dynamic
enhancement (or even substitute) for the traditional and static art
history textbook. Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker began
smARThistory in 2005 by creating a blog
featuring free audio guides in the form of podcasts for use in The
Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Soon after, we
embedded the audio files in our online survey courses. The response
from our students was so positive that we decided to create a
multi-media survey of art history web-book. We created audios and
videos about works of art found in standard art history survey texts,
organized the files stylistically and chronologically, and added text
and still images.”

What I really like about this site is that you can contact the creators to contribute to the site, by images of works or museums loaded on flickr or working with them to create audio and video files of works of art similar to what’s on the website. It’s a great way to engage students about art from different time periods, styles, and countries. To find out more, click on the link below:


Mashable’s Guide on How to Manage Multiple Social Media Profiles

mashable_logo.jpgYou have started to sign up for a few social media services like YouTube, blogs, Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, etc. because you wanted to reach your students or audience in a different way through these services. Now you are realizing it’s hard to keep all these services updated and organized. Mashable has a list of tools in their post that can keep you organized and active on your social media accounts. Click the link below to view the article:

Mashable’s Guide to Managing Multiple Social Media Profiles

Academic Earth: Thousands of Video Lectures at Your Fingertips

academic_earth_logo.jpgHave you ever wanted to watch a lecture on a certain topic from any University from a well known lecturer? Academic Earth is a service where you can watch recorded lectures from places like MIT, Yale, and Princeton. You can also search by lecturer or topic.  Some of these materials are also available on iTunesU or YouTube.

Another feature that’s nice about Academic Earth is that you can rate the lecture. Here is the site if you would like to check out some video lectures: