Tag Archives: New Jersey

Lunch & Learn: Mapping and Emergency Response: Managing a Flood of Data presented by Bill Guthe, Wangyal Shawa

Wednesday, October 5,
12:00 noon

***Oakes Lounge, Whig Hall***
Mapping and Emergency Response: Managing a Flood of Data
Bill Guthe, Wangyal Shawa

Following any significant event, people expect to find information on-line regarding the event’s location and potential impacts.  Such information is provided through existing GIS datasets, satellite images, on-site sensors, and eyewitnesses, and comes more quickly and in greater detail than ever.  The greatest challenges are to assess data quality and relevance, judge spatial accuracy and precision, and make the data available for others to analyze and present.  International structures to manage spatial data will be described, and examples of recent earthquakes, public events, and hurricanes will be explored.
About the speakers:
Bill Guthe helps faculty, staff and students use Geographic Information Systems  (GIS) and satellite image processing software.  Prior to joining OIT in 2000, he held a number of positions in New Jersey state government integrating GIS into environmental decision-making.  Bill works closely with Tsering Wangyal Shawa, the GIS librarian in the Princeton University Library, to provide training and ongoing support to GIS and remote sensing software users.  These include short training sessions, half-semester courses, and customized training provided as part of other courses.  Bill also helps individuals with coding or processing issues they may encounter using the software.  With Mike Chupa, Bill supports users of the PICSciE Visualization Laboratory to explore spatial and scientific information in a large-screen, high-definition display environment.
Wangyal Shawa is a Geographic Information Systems and Map Librarian at Princeton University. In this role, Mr. Shawa is responsible for the design, launching, and management of an automated digital cartographic and geospatial information service in a campus-wide networked environment. He has widespread experience in geospatial data selection, software and hardware and holds degrees in the areas of library science, education, geography, and cartography. He is an active member of the American Library Association Map and Geography Round Table (ALA MAGERT) and was the chair of ALA MAGERT (2005-2006). He was selected by the National Research Council and the Federal Geographic Data Committee’s Homeland Security Working Group to study and publish reports on “Licensing Geographic Data and Services” and “Guidelines for Providing Appropriate Access to Geospatial Data in Response to Security Concerns.”  He was born in Tibet and has lived and taught geography and cartography to high school and undergraduate students in India, Nepal, Kenya, and Sudan.

The Productive Scholar: John LeMasney on Sketchup

Use Google SketchUp to create, modify and share 3D models for free.
Speaker bio:
John LeMasney is a father, artist, designer, consultant, technologist, open web advocate and open source evangelist living and working in New Jersey.
He is the Manager of Educational Technology Training and Outreach at Princeton University, responsible for training and presenting to faculty and students about the effective use of technology for communication, work, teaching and learning. He tries to help people get things done.
John received his Bachelor of Fine Arts with honors from the  University of the Arts in Philadelphia, PA in 1998.
He received his Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership (communication) with honors from Rider University in Lawrenceville, NJ in 2009.
You can see his design work in a daily design blog at http://365sketches.org

A faculty guide to ETC services at Princeton


20110816 (Photo credit: lemasney)

What is the Educational Technologies Center at Princeton

The Educational Technology Centers at Princeton University have assisted faculty members at Princeton in using technology in teaching, learning, and research for more than two decades. In fact the present ETC had it roots in the ICGL, the Interactive Computing Graphics Laboratory, established at Princeton in 1974.

Things have changed quite a bit since then: the original purpose of
the laboratory was to allow graphics support for faculty, staff and
student projects. The work terminals used in the first lab on the fourth
story of the E-Quad, were connected to a mainframe computer, allowing
users to do complex visualizations of data and research. Today, each one
of us has a computer or portable device that exceeds the capabilities
of that mainframe.

Just because computing has become smaller, cheaper and almost
ubiquitous in our daily lives, it doesn’t always mean that it’s always
easy to pick the best solution for a need. When ETC assumed its present
name in 1999, the tagline for this group was “technology consultants for
faculty.” That remains ETC’s mission. For more than two decades, we
have been working with Princeton faculty members on projects that
combine their scholarship with current technology.

We’re here to help.

How can we help you?

Do you need some advice on how to use an interesting new technology in your course? Do you have a teaching or research project that could benefit from IT?

Here are a few examples of the sorts of services we provide:

  • we can send someone to your office to give you a one-on-one tour of the new Blackboard 9
  • we can give you advice on how to use discussion boards, blogs or
    other social media to improve the quality of student feedback in your
  • we can advise you on the current state of trending technologies, for
    example, how an e-book reader or slate-type mobile device might help to
    improve your productivity
  • we can tame your office hours by providing tools that make
    scheduling easier, or allow you to hold your office hours online at
    hours more convenient to you and your students
  • we can help you budget IT needs in your next grant proposal
  • we can get you or your department a presence on the web that represents your professional life at Princeton
  • we can consult with you about exploring new technologies you may not have the time to research yourself
  • we can discuss the possibilities of testing new technologies in an upcoming course

Lunch & Learn: Gold Award for Outreach Efforts

The integrated outreach effort centered on the Lunch ‘n Learn Information Technology seminars has just received a gold medal for Best Practices in Communications in the 2009 CASE II Accolades Awards. CASE, the Council for Support and Advancement of Education, makes annual awards to educational institutions in 40 different categories, including alumni relations, communications, design, development, grant writing, magazines, marketing, news writing, photography, portals, publications, and Web.
For more than 15 years, Princeton University’s Office of Information Technology has sponsored the lunch time series featuring speakers with varied affiliations exploring a wide array of cutting edge technology topics. During the past four years, Academic ServicesEducation and Outreach Services have sought to transform the existing series into fully integrated outreach, with these blog posts, high quality podcasts, RSS feeds, and through Facebook, demonstrating how a small outreach office with sophisticated collaboration tools can leverage its resources.

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Lunch & Learn: Princeton team issues report on voting machine security with J. Alex Halderman and Andrew Appel

With the presidential election less than a month away, and with market volatility at levels that are unprecedented for generations, we can all hope that November 4 generates an unambiguous result, at least for the presidential race. In the aftermath of the 2000 election debacle, we all share the additional hope that each of our votes will be accurately counted.
During 2007, two speakers in our Lunch ‘n Learn series summarized the inherent difficulties of current vote-tabulating technologies. J. Alex Halderman described the efforts of Princeton researchers to examine several widely used electronic voting systems. In the wake of that analysis, which discovered that the machines were susceptible to attacks that could alter election results, Computer Scientist Andrew Appel spoke of the need for Voter-Verifiable paper ballots and random hand audits of selected precincts.

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