Tag Archives: New Media

Lunch & Learn: Blogs, lulz and tweets: Social media comes to Princeton with Shan Hilton and John Jameson

PUSocialMedia.jpgWhy has the use of Facebook and other social networking sites exploded? Perhaps, suggest John Jameson and Shani Hilton of Princeton’s Office of Communications, because it is now possible to interact socially with very large numbers of people in ways that are no more difficult than sending out a simple e-mail.

Most users need not worry about the coding or the construction of their pages. They can simply concern themselves with what they should share, and not share.

The technologies are changing rapidly (MySpace, for example, has lost 20% of their users in just two months), bringing enormous opportunities, challenges, and some significant policy headaches.

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Lunch & Learn: Princeton University’s Broadcast Center: First Cuts

The new Peter B. Lewis Library contains a new OIT-operated Broadcast Center with a high definition video studio that features a green room with a 65 inch LCD screen, a professional audio recording studio, as well as the hardware and software to edit video, color correct footage, and sweeten and edit audio. The Studio also has a Broadcast van with full, mobile production capabilities.
The Broadcast Studio staff is happy to assist members of the University community from the beginning through the end of their A/V projects, from the actual shoots through video editing and the final distribution. Some of the projects involve location shoots (from single camera shoots through full production), live event productions (such as Commencement and Opening Exercises), and in-studio shoots that aid in control of lighting and other key conditions. The Center also manages lecture recordings (including he integration of lecture A/V and speaker slides), podcasts, and rich media content.

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Lunch & Learn: Creative Commons: Guilt-Free Reuse of Others’ Work with Keith Gresham and David Hollander

Modern copyright law guarantees authors full rights over their work even without the inclusion of the © copyright notice. “All rights reserved” gives authors (for the length of their lives plus 70 years) the sole right to copy their works, to prepare derivatives or revisions of their works, to distribute or publish, or to perform or display their works in public.
Such unrestricted rights can create problems and generate fair-use confusion for members of the academic community who want to incorporate photographs, illustrations, music, video, and other forms of creative content into their own publications, lectures, presentations, and projects. Fair use may not infringe on copyright, and the factors used to determine what is and is not fair use include the purpose and character of the use, the nature of the copyrighted work, the amount of the work used, and the effect of such use upon the value of the copyrighted work.

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Lunch & Learn: E-books: Princeton and Beyond Adriana Popescu and Priscilla Treadwell

When e-books began to appear in the early 2000’s, there was speculation about the demise of the printed book. While that clearly did not come to pass, e-books have now become a staple of the reference holdings of many libraries. The library and consumer markets have matured, and despite all predictions and speculations, print books and e-books have continued to co-exist quite nicely at the Princeton University Library.
At the December 3, 2008 Lunch ‘n Learn Adriana Popescu, Princeton’s Engineering Librarian and Plasma Physics Librarian, and Priscilla Treadwell, Electronic Publications Marketing Manager at the Princeton University Press, presented both the library and publisher perspectives: Princeton University Library’s selection process for e-books, and the usage patterns at the University that reveal what readers in an academic environment like and don’t like about e-books; and Princeton University Press’s rationale for making certain content available to both the library and consumer markets.

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Lunch & Learn: Google Earth & Sky with Bill Guthe and Ben Johnston

In the few short years since it became freely available, Google Earth has become commonly used to explore the earth’s surface, to navigate geographic paths, to locate points of interest, and to store and serve terabytes of geographic information.
Google Earth is a free Virtual Globe or Geobrowser that allows you to display images of the earth on a globe and provides the illusion of manipulating a three-dimensional globe on-screen.

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