Tag Archives: Tools

Lunch and Learn: SearchIt@PUL with Nancy Pressman-Levy and Jeremy Darrington

Wednesday, February 29,
12:00 noon

Frist Multipurpose Room B
SearchIt@PUL:  New Research Discovery Tool from the Library
Nancy Pressman-Levy, Jeremy Darrington
Would you like to learn how to expand your research beyond Google?   SearchIt@PUL, the Library’s new discovery system introduced in the fall of 2011, is just the tool you need to help you discover the impressive resources the Princeton University Library makes available.  SearchIt@PUL consists of two research options:
Catalog+ is a new interface to the Library’s Main Catalog, which allows you to limit a search by “post-search” facets, renew items online, manage saved titles, and place various requests.  
Articles+ is a large search engine that links to full-text journal and newspaper articles, as well as to other electronic content from the Library’s online subscriptions.  Other content includes dissertations, book reviews, conference proceedings, art and photo images, and audio recordings.
Join Princeton librarians Jeremy Darrington and Nancy Pressman Levy for a  demo of this exciting new system.
About the speakers:
Jeremy Darrington is Princeton’s Politics Librarian and a member of the Library’s Discovery Implementation team. Jeremy works extensively with students and faculty to help them find data and sources for their research. His interests include the use of technology in research and instruction, changes in the scholarly communication system, access to government information, preservation of research data, and digital privacy. He is ABD in political science from UC Berkeley and has a Masters in Library and Information Science from the University of Washington.
Nancy Pressman Levy is the Head of the Donald E. Stokes Library and a member of the Library’s Discovery Implementation team.
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Tech Spotlight: GoogleDocs Discussions

A couple months ago I did a presentation at Productive Scholar about annotating digital documents. I didn’t talk much about GoogleDocs in that talk.  Although their commenting feature was perfectly nice, it seemed a bit too simple and didn’t seem to really take advantage of the medium. Well apparently also a couple months ago, Google changed their commenting feature and it is worth taking another look at.  They are now calling them ‘discussion’ rather than comments which makes perfect sense because they have added the ability to reply to comments much as you would in a discussion board or when commenting on a blog post. Each reply in a discussion has a picture of the commenter so it is clear who commented, and a timestamp so it is clear when they commented. The author of a comment can also be alerted by e-mail when someone replies to their comment. There is also a button labeled ‘Resolve’ in the discussion area. Clicking this button will hide the discussion from view.  It can later be restored from a ‘Discussions’ menu in the upper right hand corner of the screen.

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Lunch and Learn: John LeMasney on 365 Sketches

What are you waiting for?

What are you waiting for?

365 Sketches is a project in which I use free and open source software to do a single visual design every day. The project is currently in its second year of production, and was started as a way to force myself to do at least one thing every day to build upon my design skills. You can visit the project and follow my progress at http://365sketches.org. As time went on, it became a public visual diary, a way for people to come together online and converse about, suggest ideas for, and critique my work. The work is occasionally practical, sometimes clever, often funny, and increasingly personal. I continue to achieve the goals that I had planned for in the beginning of the project. I have seen a gradual improvement and evolution of my design, typography and photomanipulation skills, but I also received many other unforeseen benefits, such as gaining an audience, being contracted for new consulting work, taking part in shows and presentations on the project, and feeling a genuine desire to keep making more pieces. Continue reading

Al Jazeera Creates Twitter Dashboard That Illustrates Middle East Revolutions

Al Jazeera recently created a Twitter Dashboard that illustrates what country people are tweeting from and what they are tweeting. It is a great graphic visualization tool of the real-time revolutions happening in the Middle East. This is a great way to visualize history in the making and how twitter can be used to record real time events. It is also a great example of how you can analyze statics in a graphical way using Twitter. If you would like the see the dashboard, click on the link below:



iSquint is a free iPod video conversion app for Mac OS X. Drag your file(s) into the iSquint window and click Start. You can choose “TV” or “iPod” size, set the quality, crop, set the audio/video bitrate and framerate.  For students creating large video files in FinalCut Pro and needing those to transfer to Youtube, iSquint is a quick and easy way to make the file small enough for upload.

On a 1GHz G4, iSquint can convert most video files to iPod-screen-sized videos in realtime. Intel Macs are up to twice as fast, and can convert videos upwards of 5x realtime – the NMC has Intel Macs!

iSquint supports MP4 and H.264 encoding (better quality).  DivX and XviD AVIs, all forms of MPEG video, and many other formats QuickTime chokes on are supported.


OS: Mac only