Tag Archives: youtube

Lunch & Learn: Video Journey: Past, Present, Future

Final Cut Pro

Final Cut Pro (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In its youth, which seems only now to be ending, film-making and film-editing required an immense amount of expensive and specialized hardware and a hefty range of fine technical skills. Today, suggested Dave Hopkins and Jim Grassi at the October 27 Lunch ‘n Learn, even teenagers with affordable hand-held devices can shoot, edit, and even distribute films for the mass market.

Be sure to run through their slides which contain a range of clips that tell the story through film. There you can watch Francis Ford Coppola predicting in the 1970s that children would someday be able to make movies of quality. There too you can watch Gus van Sant, a master film editor splicing tapes. Imagine the cumbersome task, when every scene and every noise involves a separate reel of 35 mm film stock. There are still editors who persist with such handiwork, manipulating bins of reels, but the immense power of new software, notably Final Cut Pro, has compelled most filmmakers to make the transition to digital. Films are now shot, edited, and delivered digitally. The films never touch tape.

And watch the simple film made by a father of his young son after a trip to the Dentist. Meant to be shared with grandparents and close friends, 70 million through YouTube have now viewed the amusing clip. An 8th grader named Brook Peters made a documentary about 9/11 that was so good that it is up for consideration at Tribecca. The point is, of course, that anyone with a camera, an idea, and some talent can now reach a very large audience. The barriers to entry have been drastically reduced.

Such technologies always trickle downward, suggests Hopkins. Quality no longer costs $15K. He showed a remarkable piece of footage taken with an iPhone. Without having to rely on tape, there’s also an immediacy with the film. There’s no longer a need to wait for post-production. Efforts, good and bad, can be sent instantly to YouTube.

New light panels are not only less expensive, he adds, but they also do not overheat and no filters are required for indoor shots.

Expect to see more use of the smaller technologies. The final episode of House this season was filmed on a very small camera, making possible footage in very closed spaces.

Hopkins and Grassi suggest that, as a result of the new technologies, a new breed of producer has evolved, a videographer “preditor,” a one-person film shoot, from idea, to the writing, the shooting, the editing, and even the distribution.

Software certainly plays an important role in making the technology so accessible. With Apple iLife, users can easily locate related clips and produce compelling movie trailers.

In the future, they suggest that we can look forward to better compression to compensate for larger hard drives, more video on walls, sidewalks, streets, and 4-D TVs that will fill all the senses.

View the presentation: direct-download video (.mp4), streaming video (Flash)
An audio podcast of the presentation is also available.

Tech Spotlights: Audacity


Audacity (Photo credit: ppip)

This session focused on the voice recording software Audacity. Audacity is a freely available program for audio recording.  Follow the link below for instructions on downloading and using this software. The software is also available on all computers in the HRC.

AUDACITY Instructions.pdf



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Tech Spotlights: Embedding video into your Blackboard course

Image representing YouTube as depicted in Crun...

Image via CrunchBase

Here’s the slideshow presentation from our Technology Spotlight Series on 3/23/2010. The topic was how to embed a YouTube video into your Blackboard course.

Here’s a link to the handout for this topic:

How to Embed Video into Your Blackboard Course (PDF)

Screencast: How to Capture Video Clips from DVD to Windows Movie Maker

Windows Movie Maker

Windows Movie Maker (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This screencast goes over the process of capturing video clips from a DVD using Windows Movie Maker. It also goes over very briefly the different ways you can edit your video clips. To get started, view these few steps before watching the screencast. To view a full size version of the screencast, please click on this link:


1. Log on to the Crestron touchscreen (a student at the front desk can assist you with signing on).

2. Click on Presentation Sources on the right of the screen. Choose DVD (if capturing clips from the DVD player or VCR if you are capturing video from a VHS tape).

Thumbnail image for DSC01180.jpg






3. Click on Video Editing on the right hand side. Make sure the editing source is set to DVD (VCR if a VHS tape). Choose PC for editing destination.








To capture the video in Windows Movie Maker, view the screencast below.

Lunch & Learn: Blogs, lulz and tweets: Social media comes to Princeton with Shan Hilton and John Jameson

PUSocialMedia.jpgWhy has the use of Facebook and other social networking sites exploded? Perhaps, suggest John Jameson and Shani Hilton of Princeton’s Office of Communications, because it is now possible to interact socially with very large numbers of people in ways that are no more difficult than sending out a simple e-mail.

Most users need not worry about the coding or the construction of their pages. They can simply concern themselves with what they should share, and not share.

The technologies are changing rapidly (MySpace, for example, has lost 20% of their users in just two months), bringing enormous opportunities, challenges, and some significant policy headaches.

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