This Week in Princeton History for July 15-21

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the rowing crew enters its first intercollegiate regatta, a professor’s connections come in handy, and more.

July 15, 1874—The College of New Jersey enters its first intercollegiate regatta. The freshman crew wins the contest against Brown and Yale.

Ticket to the intercollegiate regatta at Saratoga Lake, July 15-16, 1874. Historical Subject Files (AC109), Box 139, Folder 4.

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This Week in Princeton History for July 8-14

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the Princetonian reappears after an epidemic, Robert Goheen anticipates racial tension on campus, and more.

July 9, 1880—In an issue delayed for weeks due to an epidemic of typhoid, the Princetonian acknowledges that the abrupt breakup of the spring session meant that there had been no opportunity for the community to grieve the loss of the 10 students who died, and offers space in its future columns for testimonials about the lives lost.

July 12, 1950—Air Force Lt. Douglas Haag ’49 is probably the first Princeton alum to die in action in the Korean War, but his remains will not be identified until 2013.

July 13, 1970—The New York Times runs an article on a panel of college presidents discussing their institutions, quoting Princeton University’s Robert Goheen: “Under the general heading of student unrest, we think we’re going to have increasing problems in the current year with our blacks…It’s going to be a long time, I think, before we work out the modes of accommodations for blacks in our universities.”

Robert F. Goheen (center) with student attendees of “The Future of the Negro Undergraduate” conference, March 30, 1967. Office of the President Records (AC193), Box 456, Folder 7.

July 14, 1793—Town and gown celebrate Bastille Day with a ball and supper at the College Inn (later known as the Nassau Inn).

For the previous installment in this series, click here.

Fact check: We always strive for accuracy, but if you believe you see an error, please contact us.

This Week in Princeton History for July 1-7

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, Harriet van Ingen joins its geologists on a trip to Newfoundland, a fire means Commencement will have to find a new home, and more.

July 1, 1927—Princeton’s new “car rule,” which prohibits students from driving cars within the Borough of Princeton, takes effect.

July 3, 1913—Princeton geologists set sail for Newfoundland. Harriet Van Ingen, wife of professor Gilbert Van Ingen, is along to aid the expedition.

Harriet Van Ingen at the Princeton University geology expedition’s camp in Newfoundland, 1913. Department of Geosciences Records (AC139), Box 19.

July 4, 1937—Though fireworks-related deaths nationwide on this date reach a high of 563, a new statewide ban on private use of firecrackers is credited with preventing deaths in town.

July 6, 1835—Nassau Hall’s evening prayer service in the chapel is disrupted by a cry of “fire” from the street. Students flee, leaving College of New Jersey president James Carnahan standing at a pulpit in an empty room. It turns out that some leftover Independence Day fireworks have ignited at the nearby First Presbyterian Church, which is now engulfed in flames. The loss of the building is disruptive to college life, because it is typically used for Commencement and other events throughout the year.

For the previous installment in this series, click here.

Fact check: We always strive for accuracy, but if you believe you see an error, please contact us.

This Week in Princeton History for June 24-30

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the sophomores conduct their annual end-of-year book burning ritual, women are enrolled in a course for the first time, and more.

June 25, 1980—Ernest Gordon, Dean of the Chapel since 1955, retires.

Ernest Gordon, undated. Dean of Religious Life and of the Chapel Records (AC144), Box 35.

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Meet Mudd’s Kelli Yakabu

Name: Kelli Yakabu

Title: John Foster and Janet Avery Dulles Archival Fellow

Educational background: I am currently pursuing my master’s degree in Library and Information Science at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle as a part-time, online student and will graduate in 2020. I earned my bachelor’s degree in American Ethnic Studies and English with a minor in French also from UW.

Kelli Yakabu. Photo by April C. Armstrong.

Previous Experience: After this fellowship, I will continue as the Accessioning Assistant for the Pacific Northwest Collection at UW Special Collections where I communicate with donors and organize and rehouse incoming collections to prepare for further processing. I currently volunteer at the Seattle Municipal Archives where I process photo slides and Densho, a Japanese-American digital archive, where I digitize photographs and manuscripts. I’ve also interned at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, the Museum of Flight in Seattle, and the UW Health Sciences Library.

Why I like archives: I love how archives can help people, especially young people, learn about and understand their own history and identity. It’s helped me reconstruct the way I think about my own identity after finding people and communities in archival records that I can connect to. It’s an indescribable feeling when you see yourself reflected back in an archive after being ignored by mainstream history and Eurocentric curriculum for years.

Other interests: In my free time, I enjoy exploring Happy Hours, going to concerts and theater performances, running, skiing, reading, and being ignored by my cat Waffles. I enjoy traveling when I can and plan to visit NYC and Philadelphia this summer.

Projects this summer: I am excited to work on accessioning and processing various Public Policy Papers and University Archives collections including the Warren Worth Bailey Papers and the Richard Holbrooke Papers. I also look forward to participating in the reference rotation and learning about and working with born-digital materials.

This Week in Princeton History for June 17-23

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a gas shortage causes headaches in town, the baseball team begins a tour playing against New England colleges, and more.

June 18, 1882—Marquand Chapel is dedicated.

Marquand Chapel, ca. 1880s. Historical Photograph Collection, Grounds and Buildings Series (AC111), Box MP29, Image No. 688.

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This Week in Princeton History for June 10-16

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a delayed cookie shipment arrives, Commencement moves to a new home, and more.

June 12, 1996—Cookies mailed to Princeton-in-Asia intern Laura Burt on November 1, 1995 finally arrive unopened in Wuhan, China.

June 13, 1894—Commencement Exercises are moved from the First Presbyterian Church (which will later be renamed Nassau Presbyterian Church) to the new Alexander Hall (also known as Commencement Hall) for the first time, where they will be held until 1922.

The 1894 program for the College of New Jersey’s 147th annual Commencement (later named Princeton University but we often find “Princeton College” on official documents rather than its official name; see caption below for June 15th’s entry for more details. (Princeton University Commencement Records (AC115), Box 3.)

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This Week in Princeton History for June 3-9

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a freshman requests the right to wear a top hat, women make national headlines for Commencement firsts, and more.

June 4, 1930—In a letter to the editor of the Princetonian, a member of the Class of 1933 requests an end to rules limiting the wearing of top hats to upperclassmen on the grounds that “this piece of apparel is indispensable to anyone having any regard for correct social usage… The Freshman or Sophomore feels self-conscious and is at a decided disadvantage in not being permitted to dress himself properly.”

Getting to wear top hats was one of the things that marked the transition from Princeton sophomore to junior in the early 20th century. Here, rising juniors march in Princeton’s annual High Hat Parade in 1915. The tradition began in the 1870s as a way to formally signify that one now had a right to wear a top hat and carry a cane on campus. Historical Photograph Collection, Campus Life Series (AC112), Box SP16, Image No. 4072.

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This Week in Princeton History for May 27-June 2

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a beloved staffer dies, a Princetonian journalist is arrested while working on a story, and more.

May 27, 1867—James Titus, a staffer known on campus as “The Navigator” or “Navvy,” dies of dropsy.

James Titus, ca. 1861. Historical Photograph Collection, Individuals Series (AC067), Box LP1, Image No. 295.

May 31, 1886—Classes are suspended in observance of Decoration Day, which will later be more commonly known as Memorial Day.

June 1, 1973—Stephen M. Freedman ’76 is studying for a final exam when police arrest him for trespassing on a farm where he interviewed and photographed migrant workers for a Daily Princetonian investigation on May 31. The charges will eventually be dismissed on the basis of the precedent set in State v. Shack (1971).

June 2, 1982—A poll finds that 1 in 4 female Princeton University students report being sexually harassed on campus.

For the previous installment in this series, click here.

Fact check: We always strive for accuracy, but if you believe you see an error, please contact us.

This Week in Princeton History for May 20-26

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, married undergraduates face a housing shortage, two Charter Club officers are sentenced to prison, and more.

May 20, 1782—Princeton president Samuel Stanhope Smith signs a receipt for Peter Elmendorf, Class of 1782, for payment of the rent of his room for the year (40 shillings).

May 21, 1971—The Daily Princetonian reports on a housing shortage facing 96 married undergraduates.

May 24, 1864—Twenty-three-year-old Abram Zabriskie, Class of 1859, a colonel in the Union Army, dies from wounds originally sustained in the Battle of Drury’s Bluff on May 16.

Abram Zabriskie, Class of 1859, ca. 1860. Historical Photograph Collection, Alumni Photographs Series (AC058), Box MP10.

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