This Week in Princeton History for February 6-12

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the first woman ever to enroll defends her dissertation, the town decides not to rely exclusively on students to fight fires, and more.

February 6, 1975—The Borough of Princeton installs a traffic light at the corner of Washington Road and Prospect Avenue, in front of 1879 Hall.

New traffic light at Washington Road and Prospect Avenue, February 1975. Photo from Daily Princetonian.

February 10, 1966—Sabra F. Meservey, the first female student ever to enroll in a degree program at Princeton University, successfully passes her Final Public Oral Examination and earns her Ph.D.

Final Public Oral Examination Report for Sabra F. Meservey, February 11, 1966. Note the change in pronouns. Graduate Academic Files (AC105).

February 11, 1788—In response to growing concerns that the College of New Jersey’s ability to provide fire protection is inadequate, the citizens of Princeton form the Hook and Ladder Company, a volunteer fire brigade. Prior to this action, the town has availed itself exclusively of the help of students and faculty to put out fires.

February 12, 1915—Princeton University observes its first Alumni Day.

For last week’s installment in this series, click here.

Fact check: We always strive for accuracy, but if you believe you see an error, please contact us.

2 thoughts on “This Week in Princeton History for February 6-12

  1. Pingback: This Week in Princeton History for February 19-25 | Mudd Manuscript Library Blog

  2. Pingback: This Week in Princeton History for February 13-19 | Mudd Manuscript Library Blog

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