This Week in Princeton History for March 20-26

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a junior wins a game show, a graduate makes history at MoMA, and more.

March 20, 2003—Three students are arrested and charged with disorderly conduct and obstructing a highway when they sit in the middle of Nassau Street bound to each other with piping to protest the Iraq War. One explains their choice to break the law: “We’ve exhausted all the other means of protest. … Any other tactic seemed inadequate in the light of the horror inherent in the attacks on the Iraqi people.”

March 22, 1951—Richard W. Kazmaier, Jr. ’52 defeats opponents on the television show Blind Date and goes out on the town with Pat Dowd of Brooklyn.

Richard Kazmaier ’52. Photo from 1952 Nassau Herald.

March 23, 1992—The FBI arrests Woodrow Wilson School applicant He Niendong, a former Chinese military intelligence officer, on charges of making phone calls threatening to kill two Chinese dissident scholars if he is not admitted to Princeton.

March 25, 1970—A retrospective exhibition of the work of Frank Stella ’58 opens at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. At 33, Stella is the youngest artist ever to be so honored.

While at Princeton University, Frank Stella ’58 was art editor of the Nassau Lit. This November 1957 cover represents his work in that capacity.

For last week’s installment in this series, click here.

Fact check: We always strive for accuracy, but if you believe you see an error, please contact us.

Leave a Reply