This Week in Princeton History for March 5-11

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, more than 150 people show up at a forum on sexual harassment, a Native American faculty member and an undergraduate support the occupation of Wounded Knee, and more.

March 5, 1987—The Women’s Center sponsors a forum to discuss an incident in which a male student physically attacked a female student at an eating club, following which both faced disciplinary action. The Discipline Committee gave her a warning for behavior that was deemed “hostile, unfriendly and provocative” and put her attacker on probation. Tensions remain high on campus as many feel this approach fails to address sexual harassment properly. More than 150 people show up, setting a record for the highest attendance ever at a forum of this kind.

March 7, 1882—Large posters mysteriously appear on campus reading “It will be let loose this Evening after Chapel. Admission, 25 cents.” Students and faculty alike are baffled until Tiger Magazine’s first issue comes out this evening.

The first issue of Princeton’s Tiger magazine, March 7, 1882.

March 9, 1973—Professor Alfonso A. Ortiz and Patrick M. Anderson ’75 join in a demonstration of support in Trenton for Native Americans occupying Wounded Knee, South Dakota.

Clipping from the Daily Princetonian. Two days before the Trenton rally, Ortiz had invited Vernon Bellecourt, national coordinator of the American Indian Movement (AIM), to speak on campus.

March 10, 1948—Professor Joseph D. McGoldrick laments the increase of migration from urban areas to the suburbs, saying it is turning American cities into “physical and political monstrosities.”

For last week’s installment in this series, click here.

Fact check: We always strive for accuracy, but if you believe you see an error, please contact us.

 

1 thought on “This Week in Princeton History for March 5-11

  1. Pingback: This Week in Princeton History for March 12-18 | Mudd Manuscript Library Blog

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