This Week in Princeton History for March 30-April 5

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the library receives a new gift of F. Scott Fitzgerald correspondence, a campus publication rails against women’s suffrage, and more.

March 31, 1967— Charles Scribner Jr. ’43 presents the Princeton University Library with Charles Scribner’s Sons complete correspondence with F. Scott Fitzgerald, Class of 1917.

An excerpt from a letter F. Scott Fitzgerald, Class of 1917, to Max Perkins, his editor at Charles Scribner’s Sons, December 20, 1924:
“Hotel des Princes, Piazza di Spague, Rome.
“Dear Max:
“I’m a bit (not very–not dangerously) stewed tonight & I’ll probably write you a long letter. We’re living in a small, unfashionable but most comfortable hotel at $525.00 a month including tips, meals, etc. Rome does not particularly interest me but it’s a big year here, and early in the spring  we’re going to Paris. There’s no use telling you my plans because they’re usually just about as unsuccessful as to work as a religious prognosticater’s [sic] are as to the End of the World. Iv’e got a new novel to write–title and all, that’ll take about a year. Meanwhile, I don’t want to start it until this is out & meanwhile I”ll do short stories for money (I now get $2000.00 a story but I hate worse than hell to do them) and there’s the never dying lure of another play.
“Now! Thanks enormously for making up the $5000.00. I know I don’t technically deserve it considering I’ve had $3000.00 or $4000.00 for as long as I can remember. But since you force it on me (inexorable [or is it exorable] joke) I will accept it. I hope to Christ you get 10 times it back on Gatsby–and I think perhaps you will.” 
Archives of Charles Scribner’s Sons (C0101); Manuscripts Division (Firestone Library), Department of Special Collections.

April 1, 1871—Today’s issue of Princeton’s College World rails against women’s involvement in politics and women’s suffrage. “It is generally advocated by women who have long since banished all the hopes which they once entertained of becoming faithful and loving wives, and who have for a long time been deprived of those charms of youth and comeliness which may have once marked them as attractive members of society. … the cause is utterly worthless, indeed, to a great measure pernicious, since it would overthrow the benefits arising from our present form of government which has been established after so much labor and bloodshed.” College World urges women to take care of orphans instead.

April 3, 1895—With the opening of Elm’s clubhouse, Princeton has a new eating club.

Elm Club dining room showing round tables with tablecloths and place settings. A china hut is against one wall.

Elm Club dining room, ca. 1920s. Photo by Richard Averill Smith. Historical Photograph Collection, Grounds and Buildings Series (AC111), Box MP042, Image No. 1253.

April 5, 1943—Beginning today, all regularly scheduled University exercises, except Sunday Chapel services, will shift forward 10 minutes. This is necessary to allow the Army trainees enough time to assemble and march to class in formation after breakfast.

Navy officers in training wearing white t-shirts seated at long rectangular tables eating.

Princeton University Naval training mess, ca. 1942. Historical Photograph Collection, Campus Life Series (AC112), Box MP214, Image No. 5624.

For the previous installment in this series, click here.

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2 thoughts on “This Week in Princeton History for March 30-April 5

  1. Pingback: This Week in Princeton History for April 6-12 | Mudd Manuscript Library Blog

  2. Perkins sure did get his money back! Thanks for the reminder of what Elm looked like in my day (1960s) – it was basically the same.

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