This Week in Princeton History for June 15-21

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, Joseph Henry’s accomplishments are honored, the Director of Admission reports on changing demographics on campus, and more.

June 16, 1885—A tablet to the memory of Prof. Joseph Henry is unveiled. The tablet commemorates Henry’s contributions to the development of the telegraph, but does not mention his assistant, Sam Parker, without whom Henry would have been unable to carry out his work.

Joseph Henry, ca. 1843. Historical Photograph Collection, Individuals Series (AC067), Box 22.

June 17, 2000—Victoria Paige ’01 completes her reign as Miss New Jersey.

Victoria Paige ’01. Photo from 2001 Nassau Herald.

June 20, 1970—The Princetonian reports on demographic changes reflected in the composition of the incoming class, quoting Director of Admission John T. Osander ’57: “For the first time in our history, the black-white composition of an incoming class could approximate that of American society as a whole.” However, significant underrepresentation of women and Native Americans is still reflected in the Class of 1974.

Cover of “Princeton in a New Light,” an admissions brochure, ca. 1971. Historical Subject Files (AC109), Box 294, Folder 1.

June 21, 1991—A man walks into Stanhope Hall with a baseball bat and informs a public safety officer of his intent to smash windows at Firestone Library. He is arrested after using a bat to break nine windows in the reference room.

For the previous installment in this series, click here.

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