Annual Report 2011: Digital Projects, Content, and Delivery

As a continuation of our series on our 2011 Annual Report, please see a description of our work in digital projects, content, and delivery:

  • Mudd staff continued work to increase our digital content in FY11. We continued a pilot project to digitize collections using our photocopier’s capacity to scan directly into PDF files.
  • Utilizing OIT’s Webspace we accessioned over 8 GB of electronic records from the Project on Ethnic Relations Records and made them available via the online finding aid for the collection.
  • Maureen Callahan investigated the Zeutschel imaging station acquired last year and developed image specifications and workflow. We hope to implement these recommendations in the fall.
  • Christie Peterson oversaw the creation of structural metadata for volumes 3-8 of the Trustees Minutes Digitization Project. Related to this, working with the University Secretary’s office and OIT, we began scanning 20th century Board of Trustees minutes for ingest into OnBase, which will OCR them. Linke also worked with the Secretary and President’s office to reduce the restriction on the Trustees minutes from 50 to 40 years.
  • The Digital Library studio completed the imaging of the Historical Photograph Collection: Grounds and Buildings series (erroneously reported last year), volumes three to eight of the Trustees Minutes, and Mudd’s Political Cartoon Collections, though these images are not yet available online due to the redesign of the Princeton University Digital Library, and, in some cases, the inability to of the PUDL to utilize EAD as a descriptive metadata format.
Stay tuned for further discussion of our 2011 work involving records management, collection development, exhibitions, and more.

Annual Report 2011: Other Major Activities in Technical Services

As a continuation of our series on our 2011 Annual Report, please see a description of other major activities in Technical Services:

  • We accepted 354 dissertations and over 1,185 senior theses in FY11 under the supervision of Lynn Durgin. Durgin has also invested significant time preparing for the shift to electronic submission of dissertations beginning in Fall 2011.
  • Adriane Hanson managed the Daily Princetonian Digitization Project which was nearly complete by the end of the year. Maureen Callahan developed an initial plan for digitization of the Princeton Weekly Bulletin; the project is scheduled to begin in fall 2011.
  • Dan Santamaria and Maureen Callahan continued to provide support to other departments in the Library who are now creating EAD finding aids, such as the Engineering Library and the Latin American Ephemera projects.
  • RBSC’s Best Practices for EAD guidelines were revised and Callahan converted the document to wiki format which allows for easier maintenance and revision. As part of the RBSC EAD Working Group, Callahan and Santamaria also made contributions to the development of a framework for delivering EAD data via Primo and also authored a proposal for a redesign of the EAD website in FY2012.
  • Staff, particularly Hanson and Peterson, tested and evaluated Archivematica for possible implementation as an electronic records and digital preservation tool.
Stay tuned for further discussion of our 2011 work involving digital projects, records management, collection development, exhibitions, and more.

Annual Report 2011: Major Activities in Accessioning of University Archives

As a continuation of our series on our 2011 Annual Report, please see a description of major activities in accessioning of University Archives:

In FY11, the University Archives accessioned 162 collections or items, a total 185.11 linear feet of records. Highlights include:
All accessions received in FY2011 have been formally accessioned, but description of University Archives accessions fell several months behind in 2011 due to staffing levels. We have developed a plan that will allow for the description of all 2011 University Archives accessions by fall 2011.
Lynn Durgin also created a greatly expanded section on the Mudd website regarding transfers and donations to the University Archives including new inventory templates.
Stay tuned for further discussion of our 2011 work involving other technical services activities, digital projects, records management, collection development, exhibitions, and more.

Annual Report 2011: Major Activities in Accessioning of Public Policy Papers

As a continuation of our series on our 2011 Annual Report, please see a description of major activities in accessioning of Public Policy Papers:

The Public Policy Papers processed 40 accessions (227 linear feet) in FY11. Highlights include:
Our revised accessioning procedures, begun in 2008, continue to be employed. This requires a baseline level of processing for everything received at the library and continues to require a substantial amount of work on accessioning new material. As such, we continue to count the linear footage total above as processed material.
Stay tuned for further discussion of our 2011 work involving accessioning of University Archives, digital projects, records management, collection development, exhibitions, and more.

Annual Report 2011: Major Activities in Processing of the University Archives

As a continuation of our series on our 2011 Annual Report, please see a description of our major activities in the processing of the University Archives:

  • University Archives processing had a strong year due to the hiring of Christie Peterson as University Archives Project Archivist. Since her start in mid-September 2010,Peterson has surveyed all University Archives collections, and formulated a processing plan to ensure that all finding aids for University Archives collections larger than 2 linear feet will include inventories by the end of 2012.
  • Major collections and groups of collections addressed in 2010 include additions to the theater collections, eating club records, and oversize material. A total of 69 collections and 811 linear feet were addressed in some form in FY2011.
Stay tuned for further discussion of our 2011 work involving accessioning, digital projects, records management, collection development, exhibitions, and more.

Annual Report 2011: Major Activities in Processing of the Public Policy Papers

As a continuation of our series on our 2011 Annual Report, please see a description of major activities in processing of the Public Policy Papers:

The main focus of Public Policy Papers processing in FY2011 was the NHPRC-funded ACLU grant project, led by Adriane Hanson, which is on schedule for completion by the end of June 2012. The entire group of records, more than 2,400 linear feet has been surveyed, and described at the box level. The first round of inventories for the project (Series 2, 3, 5 and 6; a total of 1,123 linear feet) is complete. Inventories are a mix of box and folder level description. Since the project was substantially ahead of schedule, we then analyzed the inventories and identified 100 linear feet that had been inventoried at the box level but have better subject access if inventoried at the folder level. The students have created folder lists for half of these boxes, and the work will be finished in August 2011.
Other Policy processing projects include the Harold Medina papers, which were recalled from ReCAP with a plan for processing developed by Maureen Callahan; processing is scheduled for completion in fall 2011. The Harold Hoskins and Leo Crespi papers will also be finalized by Dulles Fellow Kate Dundon by the end of summer 2011.
Stay tuned for further discussion of our 2011 work involving processing of the University Archives, accessioning, digital projects, records management, collection development, exhibitions, and more.

Annual Report 2011: Major Activities in Technical Services

As a continuation of our series on our 2011 Annual Report, please see a description of major activities in technical services:

  • Fiscal Year 2010 was a transitional year in Mudd Library Technical Services, with Christie Peterson and Maureen Callahan hired in September and February respectively to fill open positions and with Lynn Durgin taking and returning from family leave.
  • April marked the first time that all Mudd Library Technical Services positions were filled with full-time staff members since 2008. A search for an SCAII to assist with the ACLU processing project also began in late spring 2011.
  • Despite staffing issues, well over 1,000 linear feet was processed and described with online records and finding aids in FY2011, with another 1,123 linear feet addressed by the ACLU processing project that will be available by the end of FY2012.

Stay tuned for further discussion of our 2011 work involving processing, accessioning, digital projects, records management, collection development, exhibitions, and more.

Annual Report 2011: Major Activities in Public Services

As a continuation of our series on our 2011 Annual Report, please see a description of our major activities in public services:

In the past year, the staff of the Mudd Manuscript Library served 1,934 patrons, 212 of whom had visited Mudd prior to FY11 and 777 who were new researchers. We circulated 9,586 items (3,141 University Archives boxes/items, 6,350 Public Policy Papers boxes/items, 93 Gest rare books and 2 other items). Staff also filled 398 photocopy orders totaling 45,253 pages, of which 232 orders were delivered as PDF files totaling 28,128 pages and 166 orders were fulfilled on paper, totaling 17,125 pages. This was our first full year offering PDFs in lieu of paper and it is not surprising that it is the preferred method for the majority of our users. Scanning continues to be the default method by which we provide images for patrons and last year we filled 105 orders for 383 scans.
We responded to over 1,795 pieces of correspondence (including 1,214 pertaining to the University Archives and 550 to the Public Policy Papers; 28 requests for permission to quote) which arrived as follows: 1,452 e-mail; 298 telephone; 37 surface mail; 4 via fax, and 4 oral inquiries.
The staff also responded to more than 640 brief telephone calls.
Collectively, the staff worked with 14 different classes relating to junior papers and other research/writing projects with a total of 198 attendees.
In addition, quite a number of visitors took advantage of Mudd’s digital camera program as 262 patrons photographed 5,582 items from our collections, totaling approximately 117,800 images.
It should be noted that while these numbers are on par with other years, the public services operation underwent significant stresses during the year. Amanda Hawk, who, like her last name implies, was fast and keen-eyed in dealing with her reference duties, left us in August to attend graduate school, just before Christie Lutz took an unplanned medical leave. Fortunately, Hawk’s replacement, Amanda Pike, started at just about that time. We were happy with both Pike’s timing as well as the fact that she brought her own thorough and professional nature to the position. Until Christie’s return in January, Amanda ably oversaw the Mudd email account, a sizable task for anyone, but especially for someone new to Mudd’s operations. Throughout the year, we received accolades from patrons for the quality of the reference services we provided.
Stay tuned for further discussion of our 2011 work involving technical services, processing, accessioning, digital projects, records management, collection development, exhibitions, and more.

Annual Report 2011: Introduction and Summary

As part of our ongoing effort to improve access to our collections and promote awareness of the Mudd Manuscript Library, we are pleased share a series of blog posts drawn from our annual report for fiscal year 2011 (which ran from July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011). We share our accomplishments with the hope that this will encourage a better understanding of Mudd’s work, as well as foster an environment of transparency in the archival field. We begin this series with a summary of our activities in 2011.

The staff at Mudd Library had a very successful year in 2011 with notable highlights that include:
  • Hired one project archivist for the University Archives project and another for the Public Policy Papers
  • University Records Manager hired in January and among many things, with other staff, began planning for an electronic records management program
  • Hired an SCAV for public services to replace the departing SCAV
  • ACLU project commences and addresses more than 1,100 linear feet of records as part of NHPRC-funded processing project
  • Fundraising for The Daily Princetonian digitization completed and the project winds down with 18 of 19 batches scanned and almost all years from 1876-2002 now online
  • University Archives audiovisual materials made available via the web on a new blog, The Reel Mudd
  • More than 1,000 linear feet processed and described with online records and finding aids
  • A record 202 accessions of over 400 linear feet received, including the long awaited Margaret Tutwiler journals
  • Continued high level of use of collections, both in-house and remote, with great degree of patron satisfaction, with PDF requests surpassing paper copies.
Stay tuned for further discussion of our 2011 work involving public services, technical services, processing, accessioning, digital projects, records management, exhibitions, and more.
You may also read the FY2011 Annual Report in its entirety here.

Lobby Case Exhibition on Moe Berg

Update — Back by popular demand! The Moe Berg Lobby Case Exhibition can be once again viewed in the lobby of the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library through August 31st, 2012.

Primarily known as a Major League catcher and coach, Morris “Moe” Berg was also a spy for the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) in World War II, as well as a lawyer, linguist, and Princeton graduate. As a member of the class of 1923, Berg excelled scholastically and athletically by graduating with honors in Modern Languages (he studied Greek, French, Spanish, Italian, German, and Sanskrit), and playing first base and shortstop for the Princeton Tigers. While his batting average was low- Berg inspired a Major League scout to utter the phrase, “Good field, no hit”- he was known at Princeton for his strong arm and sound baseball instincts.

The exhibit highlights the varied roles of Berg in its presentation of Princeton memorabilia from the class of 1923, Berg baseball cards, and other material culled from Mudd’s two collections on Moe Berg: The Moe Berg Collection (1937-2007), and the newly acquired Dr. and Mrs. Arnold Breitbart Collection on Moe Berg (1934-1933). Also on display is a 1959 baseball signed by Berg and other Major League players, on loan from Arnold Breitbart. The Moe Berg exhibit can be located in the lobby of the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, and was originally on display until August 31, 2011.


[i] Dawidoff, Nicholas. The Catcher Was a Spy: The Mysterious Life of Moe Berg. New York: Pantheon, 1994.