Mudd Manuscript Library Annual Report: Fiscal Year 2012

Mudd Manuscript Library Annual Report, FY2012



The staff at Mudd Library had a very successful year in 2012 with notable highlights that include:

  • Prepared for the launch of Aeon on July 1, 2012.  This required significant work from both public and technical services staff.
  • Significant work done to upgrade access tools, in particular a new finding aids site launched in beta, and other work done to prepare for integration of EAD data into Primo.
  • ACLU project completed, with almost 2,500 linear feet of records described as part of NHPRC-funded processing project.
  • In addition to ACLU, 1,800 linear feet of other policy and archives materials described, including the Harold Medina Papers.
  • The Daily Princetonian digitization completed, with the years 1876-2002 now online.
  • Dissertation submission procedure altered to provide full-text, online access via OIT’s DataSpace.
  • Hosted IMLS intern Brenda Tindal
  • Continued high level of use of collections, both in-house and remote, with great degree of patron satisfaction, with PDF requests surpassing paper copies.

Major Activities

Public Services

In the past year, the staff of the Mudd Manuscript Library served 1,686 patrons, 211 of whom had visited Mudd prior to FY12 and 678 who were new researchers. We circulated 8,531 items (2,761 University Archives boxes/items, 5,812 Public Policy Papers boxes/items, 34 Gest rare books and 14 other items). For more on particular collections used, see Appendix A: Most used Archives and Policy collections in FY2012.

Staff also filled 354 photocopy orders totaling 39,431 pages, of which 265 orders were delivered as PDF files totaling 27,338 pages and 89 orders were fulfilled on paper, totaling 12,093 pages, so a PDF continues to be the preferred method for the majority of our users.  Scanning continues to be the default method by which we provide images for patrons and last year we filled 90 orders for 266 scans.

We responded to over 1,900 pieces of correspondence (including 882 pertaining to the University Archives and 403 to the Public Policy Papers; 16 requests for permission to quote) which arrived as follows: 1,317 e-mail; 111 telephone; 23 surface mail and 1 via fax.  Individual correspondence totals:  Maureen Callahan, 64; Christa Cleeton, 7; John DeLooper, 15; Kate Dundon, 20; Lynn Durgin, 108; Dave Gillespie, 9; Adriane Hanson, 81; Dan Linke, 207; Christie Lutz, 184; Christie  Peterson, 88; Amanda Pike, 340; Dan Santamaria, 27; Brenda Tindal, 18; Kristen Turner, 35; Helene van Rossum, 5; Rosalba Recchia, 82.   The staff also responded to more than 500 brief telephone calls.

Collectively, the staff worked with 9 different classes relating to junior papers and other research/writing projects with a total of approximately 115 attendees.

In addition, a large number of visitors took advantage of Mudd’s digital camera program as 279 patrons photographed 6,419 items from our collections, totaling 73,338 images.

John DeLooper left Mudd in September to accept a reference librarian position, and in early December, Christa Cleeton joined the Mudd staff as the new SCAIV for public services (front desk position). Christa, who had previously worked at Firestone, quickly and efficiently assumed the duties of the position, from greeting and registering patrons to overseeing student workers to carrying out special projects for Dan Linke. Significantly, Christa became the coordinator for Mudd’s social media efforts, responsible for our blogs, Facebook page and Twitter feed, all of which she has energetically attended to. She has been attending the University’s Social Media SPIN meetings, and working directly with the University’s director of social media to implement best practices and draw more attention to our social media output. Christa also assisted Lisbeth Dennis in creating a Facebook page for RBSC.

The biggest change in Mudd’s public services operations this year was the implementation of the Aeon circulation management system, done in conjunction with the rest of RBSC. All Mudd staff attended training sessions in January, with Lutz, Pike and Cleeton participating in extra training and numerous meetings regarding implementation, use, and workflow issues. Full implementation took several months, but in June we conducted preliminary tests of the system, and starting in July, began using the system.  Lutz, Pike and Cleeton worked to alert current and future Mudd researchers to the changes through our website, social media outlets, and in exchanges with patrons. Both experienced and new Mudd users have been quite receptive to the new system and particularly appreciate that they can submit requests for materials prior to their arrival at Mudd. While there was some concern among staff that we must first send researchers to the Access Office in Firestone to obtain Special Collections identification cards, we have not heard many patron complaints over the need to make this extra stop. However, this stop is a temporary measure until Mudd obtains the hardware and software necessary to create the ID cards here at Mudd.

Throughout the year, we received accolades from patrons for the quality and efficiency of the reference services we provided.

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Annual Report 2011: Collection and Financial Development

As a continuation of our series on our 2011 Annual Report, please see a description of our work in Collection and Financial Development:

  • See the entries on accessioning Public Policy Papers and University Archives for collections of note acquired in this fiscal year. In addition, during the past year gift agreements were signed with Edward Djerejian (who served as Ambassador to both Syria and Israel) and James Hoge (the outgoing editor of Foreign Affairs), though no documents were delivered during the fiscal year.
  • Linke finished raising money for the digitization of the Daily Princetonian, with over a quarter of a million dollars accrued for this project.
  • The James Baker Oral History Project completed seven additional interviews with Susan Baker, Edward Djerejian, Francoise Djerjian, Marlin Fitzwater, John Major, John Sununu, and Robert Zoellick.
Stay tuned for further discussion of our 2011 work involving exhibitions, public relations, and goals for fiscal year 2012.

Annual Report 2011: Major Activities in Accessioning of University Archives

As a continuation of our series on our 2011 Annual Report, please see a description of major activities in accessioning of University Archives:

In FY11, the University Archives accessioned 162 collections or items, a total 185.11 linear feet of records. Highlights include:
All accessions received in FY2011 have been formally accessioned, but description of University Archives accessions fell several months behind in 2011 due to staffing levels. We have developed a plan that will allow for the description of all 2011 University Archives accessions by fall 2011.
Lynn Durgin also created a greatly expanded section on the Mudd website regarding transfers and donations to the University Archives including new inventory templates.
Stay tuned for further discussion of our 2011 work involving other technical services activities, digital projects, records management, collection development, exhibitions, and more.

Annual Report 2011: Major Activities in Accessioning of Public Policy Papers

As a continuation of our series on our 2011 Annual Report, please see a description of major activities in accessioning of Public Policy Papers:

The Public Policy Papers processed 40 accessions (227 linear feet) in FY11. Highlights include:
Our revised accessioning procedures, begun in 2008, continue to be employed. This requires a baseline level of processing for everything received at the library and continues to require a substantial amount of work on accessioning new material. As such, we continue to count the linear footage total above as processed material.
Stay tuned for further discussion of our 2011 work involving accessioning of University Archives, digital projects, records management, collection development, exhibitions, and more.

New Public Policy Accessions: May – June 2011

There’s a scene in a documentary about the French philosopher Jacques Derrida where Derrida visits UC Irvine (where he had donated his personal papers). The philosopher, going through the rows of newly-processed collections, comments that the gray archival boxes on the shelves look like little gravestones.

For someone whose best-known axiom was that "there is nothing outside the text," and who was very concerned about who has "authority" over the archive, perhaps it was somewhat distressing for Derrida to see his texts buried away in folders, boxes, shelves and behind locked doors.

It’s easy to understand this concern. In some ways, archival records are by their nature "dead" — they have been given to the archives because they’re no longer used in the course of daily business. And it’s true that most institutions keep these materials tucked away in closed stacks.

On the other hand, from my point of view as someone who processes new accessions as they come to Mudd, collections are constantly growing, re-interpreted by new context and new evidence, and given new life through the research and reference process. We care for collections so that they may find new life — all of our core activities, as an institution, are to serve researcher needs in their synthesis and analysis of the past.

In May and June of this year, most of our accessions were additions to collections we already hold — in some cases, this was an instance of a donor finding or having created additional material that rounds out our collections. In most cases, new additions to an archival collections are an opportunity to re-examine the existing collection from a new point of view.

We hope that this will be the case with our newest additions. Here is a list of what we received in May and June:

[ML.2011.015] Photocopy of Douglas Linder Article
[ML.2011.016] Photographs and correspondence to William H. Kellenberger from John Foster Dulles
[ML.2011.017] Women’s World Banking Records
[ML.2011.019] Chalmers Benedict Wood Papers
[ML.2011.021] George S. McGovern Photographs and Letters
[ML.2011.022] Marten van Heuven Writings and Correspondence
[ML.2011.023] Woodrow Wilson Letter
[ML.2011.025] Kennett Love Papers

New Public Policy Accessions: April 2011

As organizations grow and change through time, so do their archives.The Mudd Manuscript Library collects the records of the American Civil Liberties Union [ML.2011.011], the Association on American Indian Affairs [ML.2011.005], and Americans United for Separation of Church and State [ML.2011.003], among many other organizations. In the last few months, we’ve had the pleasure of receiving a new cache of materials from each of these organizations and adding them to existing collections. Although some materials from both the ACLU and AAIA may be restricted for some time to comply with legal and privacy concerns, the remainder will be valuable to researchers hoping to learn about the recent history of these important organizations.

In addition to these organization records, we have also received an accrual of papers from James A. Baker III, former Chief of Staff to President Reagan and Secretary of State to President George H.W. Bush [ML.2011.002]. These records, mostly from his post-Washington career, include research files created during the writing of his memoir, correspondence, events files, and a small number of financial files. They also include his “desk drawer” files, letters and notes from important figures in his career, including Presidents George H.W. and George W. Bush, Nancy Reagan, Henry Kissinger, and Karl Rove. Please consult the finding aid for this collection for access restrictions.

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New Public Policy Accessions: July 2010 – March 2011

One of Mudd’s newest accessions, the Kristen Timothy Papers, finds itself in good company with other Mudd collections documenting individuals who have had profound influence in the United Nations, including the papers of Margaret Snyder, Regional Advisor of the

United Nations Economic Commission for Africa; Henry R. Labouisse, Director of UNRWA and Executive Director of UNICEF; David A. Morse, Director-General of the ILO; and many other luminaries.

Timothy organized the United Nations’ Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing in 1995. The conference addressed enduring inequalities for women and girls across the world. Timothy was instrumental in outlining the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which were adopted by consensus on 15 September 1995.

Timothy’s records include audio-visual materials (much of which is available online), records regarding the creation of the platform for action, materials created in preparation for and during the conference, and a series of Timothy’s research records on the history of the global women’s movement.

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New Accessions: April-June 2010

The Mudd Manuscript Library received 12 public policy accessions and 30 University Archives accessions between April and June 2010.

The public policy collections received significant additions to the American Civil Liberties Union Records and the Council on Foreign Relations Records. In addition, a wonderful surprise was the receipt of Woodrow Wilson’s and Edith Bolling Galt’s marriage license, 1915. The item was donated by Mr. Barry C. Keenan of Granville, OH, who also confessed to having caused the green ink stain on the document as a ten-year-old.

Wilson marriage license

On the University Archives side, the Library received the papers of two important Princeton figures– Dr. Carl. A. Fields and Dean Mathey.
Educator and advocate of minority education, Dr. Carl A. Fields was assistant dean of student aid at Princeton University and later served in various other leadership positions outside the University. The Carl A. Fields Papers consist of correspondence, reports, research material on race relations and minority education, handwritten notes, project proposals, and other papers that document his life and active career. An online finding aid for this collection is available at:
Dean Mathey, Class of 1912, was a member of the Board of Trustees and an ardent supporter of the University. The collection documents Mathey’s familial relationships, his service to Princeton, his tennis career and other activities from his undergraduate days to the end of his life. A finding aid is for this collection is in process.
The following is a complete list of materials that were accessioned between April and June of 2010. As always, if you would like additional information about these materials, please contact us through our general email account at

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New Accessions: January through March 2010, Part II

In January, the University Archives acquired a lecture notebook penned by Elijah Rosengrant (1776-1832). The notebook was written in the spring of 1791 for John Witherspoon’s course "Lectures on Moral Philosophy." The significance of the notebook derives not only from its documentation of President Witherspoon as a faculty lecturer and of the pedagogical technique of the college in the 18th century, but also from the fact that Elijah Rosengrant was not enrolled as a student in the College of New Jersey (as Princeton was then known). In fact, Rosengrant was a student of Queen’s College (now Rutgers University), Class of 1791, in New Brunswick, New Jersey.


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New Accessions: January through March 2010, Part I

The Mudd Manuscript Library received 8 public policy accessions and 31 University Archives accessions between January and March 2010.

In January, the Library purchased a rare pamphlet written in Yiddish supporting Woodrow Wilson’s bid for reelection 1917. The pamphlet is one of only a handful of Yiddish-language Wilsoniana known to exist (accession number ML.2010.003).


In addition, in March the Library purchased a personal notebook by James Forrestal containing records of meetings and conversations as well as Forrestal’s thoughts on current events for the year 1949. The notebook, which is typed but contains a number of handwritten items, seamlessly complements Mudd’s prior holdings of Forrestal’s diaries. It is especially noteworthy because Forrestal was in the habit of typing even his personal notes, making this one of the scarce examples of Forrestal’s handwriting (accession number ML.2010.008).


Coming soon in New Accessions, Part II will be an accessions highlight from the University Archives– the Elijah Rosengrant Lecture Notebook, 1791.

The following is a complete list of materials that were accessioned between January through March 2010. As always, if you would like additional information about these materials, please contact us through our general email account

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