This Week in Princeton History for April 2-8

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the Judicial Committee makes its first disciplinary decisions, the campus debates housing policies for same sex couples, and more.

April 2, 1917—Senator Henry Cabot Lodge attacks Alexander Bannwart, Class of 1906, in the only known case of a U.S. Senator physically attacking a constituent. Bannwart and two others visited the Massachusetts senator to protest President Woodrow Wilson’s request for a Congressional declaration of war against Germany.

Alexander Bannwart, ca. 1906. Historical Photograph Collection, Student Photograph Albums Series (AC061), Box 116.

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This Week in Princeton History for March 26-April 1

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the debate team takes up women’s suffrage, a letter defends Russell Crowe’s behavior on campus, and more.

March 26, 1957—Thanks to a local law prohibiting coin-operated games not requiring skill, the last of Princeton’s pinball machines is removed, saddening undergraduates.

Clipping from the Daily Princetonian.

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This Week in Princeton History for March 19-25

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, Langston Hughes recites poetry, a third of the women in the Graduate School drop out, and more.

March 19, 1877—At a temperance meeting on campus, nine students sign a pledge to abstain from alcohol.

March 22, 1928—Langston Hughes recites poetry in Alexander Hall.

March 23, 1987—Dragoljub Cetkovic, a former Princeton University graduate student, confesses to poisoning a tea bag at a local grocery store.

March 25, 1963—The Daily Princetonian reports that a third of the female students in the Graduate School are dropping out.

Clipping from the Daily Princetonian. For more on the early history of women in the Graduate School, see our previous post on this topic.

For last week’s installment in this series, click here.

Fact check: We always strive for accuracy, but if you believe you see an error, please contact us.

This Week in Princeton History for March 12-18

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, Women Oriented Women are leaving stickers around campus to increase awareness of lesbianism, former U.S. President Jimmy Carter asks professors for advice, and more.

March 12, 1969—About 500 disgruntled alumni calling themselves Alumni Committee to Involve Ourselves Now (ACTION) announce a campaign to attempt to overturn the Board of Trustees’ decision to make Princeton coeducational.

Although a significant number of alumni opposed coeducation, not all were on the same page. Henry Lyttleton Savage of the Class of 1915 sent this postcard to ACTION, saying, “The Charter gives no support to any who oppose co-education. Its allusions are to ‘students’ and ‘youth.’ Those terms cover any change to co-education.” Alumni Association Records (AC048), Box 20.

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This Week in Princeton History for March 5-11

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, more than 150 people show up at a forum on sexual harassment, a Native American faculty member and an undergraduate support the occupation of Wounded Knee, and more.

March 5, 1987—The Women’s Center sponsors a forum to discuss an incident in which a male student physically attacked a female student at an eating club, following which both faced disciplinary action. The Discipline Committee gave her a warning for behavior that was deemed “hostile, unfriendly and provocative” and put her attacker on probation. Tensions remain high on campus as many feel this approach fails to address sexual harassment properly. More than 150 people show up, setting a record for the highest attendance ever at a forum of this kind.

March 7, 1882—Large posters mysteriously appear on campus reading “It will be let loose this Evening after Chapel. Admission, 25 cents.” Students and faculty alike are baffled until Tiger Magazine’s first issue comes out this evening.

The first issue of Princeton’s Tiger magazine, March 7, 1882.

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This Week in Princeton History for February 26-March 4

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, Oprah Winfrey makes a surprise visit, sales of an undergraduate publication are banned, and more.

February 27, 1931—The Daily Princetonian reports on a recent interview with Bruce Barton, a prominent author and advertising executive who will later represent Manhattan in the U.S. Congress, quoting him as saying, “Going to college is a current fad, like Backgammon,” but because “People who would be ruined by college would be ruined anyway,” it hurts no one.

February 28, 1998—Oprah Winfrey makes an unannounced visit to Lowrie House to record an interview with Toni Morrison.

March 1, 1948—Although the faculty decline to discipline the students responsible for the Nassau Sovereign’s “Unofficial Register,” which offended many, a ban on sales of the student publication in the U-Store remains in effect.

The “Unofficial Register of Princeton University” mimicked the Official Register of Princeton University in many respects, but offered a student’s perspective on the merits of certain professors and courses rather than neutral information. Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Students Records (AC136), Box 12

March 3, 1969—The faculty approve a program in Afro-American studies.

For last week’s installment in this series, click here.

Fact check: We always strive for accuracy, but if you believe you see an error, please contact us.

This Week in Princeton History for February 19-25

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, Thurgood Marshall begins a lecture series, faculty and students gather for a teach-in about a pending war, and more.

February 19, 1964—Thurgood Marshall begins a series of lectures on “The Constitutional Rights of the Negro.”

February 20, 1991—As escalating hostilities suggest the United States is on the brink of war with Iraq, members of the Princeton University community gather for a day-long teach-in about the Persian Gulf crisis at the Woodrow Wilson School.

Teach Peace organized many events during the Persian Gulf Crisis in 1990 and 1991. This flyer advertises another teach-in held November 29-30, 1990. Historical Subject Files (AC109), Box 204, Folder 12. For more on the impact of war on education at Princeton, please join us for a panel discussion on February 28.

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This Week in Princeton History for February 12-18

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, debates over fallout shelters are taking place, Henry Fairfax makes his last deliveries, and more.

February 12, 1962—The Fallout Shelter Committee presents its recommendations to Princeton University president Robert Goheen, provoking debate over the school’s responsibilities to local residents and visitors in the event of a nuclear attack.

Map of fallout shelters at Princeton University, ca. 1962. (Click to enlarge.) Office of Physical Planning Records (AC154), Box 32.

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This Week in Princeton History for February 5-11

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the library makes a significant change in how it catalogs books, the Board of Trustees is divided over a hiring decision, and more.

February 5, 1976—University Librarian Richard Boss announces that new materials will use the Library of Congress classification system rather than the Richardson system unique to Princeton, originally developed in the 1890s by Boss’s predecessor, Ernest Cushing Richardson. Richardson felt that the Dewey classification system was inappropriate for a research library. However, in the open stacks, books with Richardson numbers would not be completely phased out until 2011.

An employee shelves books in the Princeton University Library, ca. 1970s. The call numbers here are all Richardson numbers. (Click to enlarge.) Historical Photograph Collection, Campus Life Series (AC112), Box MP06, Image No. 132.

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This Week in Princeton History for January 29-February 4

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the death of a member of the Class of 1919 sparks national debate, the chess club organizes, and more.

January 29, 1975—Alum Henry Pitney van Dusen (Class of 1919) enters into a suicide pact with his wife. Their deaths will spark nationwide debate over euthanasia.

January 30, 1997—Sarina Sassoon ’00 appears on the Late Show with David Letterman, where she discusses Princeton’s mascot and her future plans, holds cue cards, and operates a camera.

Sarina Sassoon ’00. Photo from 2000 Nassau Herald.

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