ARCH Participants Write, Part VI

As part of the Princeton University Library’s inaugural Archives Research and Collaborative History (ARCH) Program, 12 undergraduates and two graduate students from five historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) explored the connections among archives, historical narratives, and social justice at Mudd Library and Firestone Library from July 9 to July 13, 2018. They were asked to reflect on their experiences in writing. This post is the sixth in a short series of such reflections.

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By Kimberly Monroe, Howard University

It has been said that archives are where memory is preserved and history is made. Archives have the ability to connect the past with the present and future, while still maintaining the character and originality it possesses. The Princeton University Archives, Research, and Collaborative History Program (ARCH) allowed students from HBCUs the opportunity to learn more about archiving as a profession and to explore the various collections at Princeton.

Kimberly Monroe, a PhD candidate from Howard University, at Mudd Library this summer. Photo by Shelley Szwast.

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ARCH Participants Write, Part V

As part of the Princeton University Library’s inaugural Archives Research and Collaborative History (ARCH) Program, 12 undergraduates and two graduate students from five historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) explored the connections among archives, historical narratives, and social justice at Mudd Library and Firestone Library from July 9 to July 13, 2018. They were asked to reflect on their experiences in writing. This post is the fifth in a short series of such reflections.

Stepping Outside the STEM Box

By Genevieve Airyanne Antoine, Tuskegee University

From my awkward middle school days to my considerably less awkward years in college, one academic gospel has been preached to me. “STEM is the future. STEM is the new wave. Don’t want a job? Choose a major that ISN’T STEM.” Sound familiar? I am sure you can relate. Fear of the future, fear of failure, and fear of my own ambitions drove me to accept this as fact. In my junior year of high school, I committed myself to take the path of a scientist. I present myself now as undergrad-level chemist and physicist. Of course, I am proud of my accomplishments. Two degrees later, however, I wonder why the current professional and academic climates have turned such a blind eye to the humanities?

Genevieve Airyanne Antoine (Tuskegee University), Kimberly Monroe (Howard University), and Adisa Vera Bradley (Howard University) [foreground] and Mudd’s Valencia Johnson, Michael Marie Thomas (Texas Southern University), and Dr. Jontyle Robinson (Tuskegee University) [background] at Mudd Library this summer. Photo by Shelley Szwast.

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ARCH Participants Write, Part IV

As part of the Princeton University Library’s inaugural Archives Research and Collaborative History (ARCH) Program, 12 undergraduates and two graduate students from five historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) explored the connections among archives, historical narratives, and social justice at Mudd Library and Firestone Library from July 9 to July 13, 2018. They were asked to reflect on their experiences in writing. This post is the fourth in a short series of such reflections.

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By Madison Washington, Lincoln University

The ARCH program provided an introductory glance into the field by archival professionals. We convened on a daily basis with staff from Mudd and Firestone Libraries, visited the Princeton University Art Museum, and spent our final day of the program at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. Throughout the week we touched on various aspects of the field and ruminated over intense discussions. One of the discussions that resonated with me was that of Dunbar Rowland and William C. Bolivar. While the stories of these two men are starkly different, their commonalities present an important narrative on the importance of agential community archiving.

Madison Washington, seated next to fellow Lincoln University student Alaze Moriah Clausell, at Mudd Library this summer. Photo by Shelley Szwast.

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ARCH Participants Write, Part III

As part of the Princeton University Library’s inaugural Archives Research and Collaborative History (ARCH) Program, 12 undergraduates and two graduate students from five historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) explored the connections among archives, historical narratives, and social justice at Mudd Library and Firestone Library from July 9 to July 13, 2018. They were asked to reflect on their experiences in writing. This post is the third in a short series of such reflections.

Do You Remember? Untitled Individuals And Closeted Negro Persons

By Kaya Mosley, Lincoln University

Being surrounded by so many fiery individuals has definitely lit a spark within me… kinda like nitrate film. Before my involvement in this program I viewed archives as simply dusty, old, mildewy smelling papers from “way back when”. Now I know that what is considered to be archives extends all the way to vinegar-smelling film and pre-presidential post-it notes. Aside from distinguishing smells, I became privy to a few more things.

Kaya Mosley and Taylor Brookins, both students from Lincoln University, at Mudd Library this summer. Photo by Shelley Szwast.

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ARCH Participants Write, Part II

As part of the Princeton University Library’s inaugural Archives Research and Collaborative History (ARCH) Program, 12 undergraduates and two graduate students from five historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) explored the connections among archives, historical narratives, and social justice at Mudd Library and Firestone Library from July 9 to July 13, 2018. They were asked to reflect on their experiences in writing. This post is the second in a short series of such reflections.

The Disappearing History of Xennials

By Michael Marie Thomas, Texas Southern University

I grew up a latchkey kid, meaning my parents worked and I came home to an empty house, but before you pull out the Kleenex, know that I was also the kid who enjoyed after school specials on television. I enjoyed Saturday morning cartoons, Saved by the Bell, cereal with real sugar, book fairs, and toys that could cause bodily harm. Basically, I enjoyed being a kid (R.I.P. Toys “R” Us). I also experienced the evolution of VCRs (R.I.P. Blockbuster), CDs (R.I.P. Borders Books and Music), cell phones (R.I.P. Motorola Razr Flip), and the internet (those who never experienced the sound of dial up internet: I really feel for you). Yet I am realizing that all these amazing things that I have grown up with are in danger of being lost to time.

Michael Marie Thomas, a student from Texas Southern University, at Mudd Library this summer. Photo by Shelley Szwast.

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ARCH Participants Write, Part I

As part of the Princeton University Library’s inaugural Archives Research and Collaborative History (ARCH) Program, 12 undergraduates and two graduate students from five historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) explored the connections among archives, historical narratives, and social justice at Mudd Library and Firestone Library from July 9 to July 13, 2018. They were asked to reflect on their experiences in writing. This post is the first in a short series of such reflections.

Beauty, Justice and the Future

By Adisa Vera Beatty, Howard University

I.

Most, likely many, of the experiences and information I encountered will continue to surface in my mind for several weeks. However, some experiences that have left an impression would be processing part of a collection and visiting the conservation lab. I’m a memory keeper so it’s not a surprise that those two experiences resonated with me. There is something very poignant to me about experiencing the artifacts of someone else’s lived life. There’s some mystery, randomness and beauty about that experience but I’m sure it loses its charm when you do it every day. Then there’s the conservation lab where there is no sifting and sorting; this space is filled with deliberate acts. They slow down, revive and restore pieces of the past daily.

The before and after results once paper conservator Ted Stanley has performed his miracles. Photo by Adisa Vera Beatty.

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