This Week in Princeton History for June 8-14

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, thanks are offered to Harriet Crocker Alexander, an anonymous donor offers the colony of New Jersey funding for a scholarship for a Native American, and more.

June 9, 1894—During the formal presentation of Alexander Hall, Princeton’s president, Francis Patton, thanks Harriet Crocker Alexander for her gift to the school.

Harriet Crocker Alexander, pictured here ca. 1880s, donated the funds to build Princeton University’s Alexander Hall in 1890. In accordance with her wishes, Alexander Hall is not named in her honor, but in honor of her husband, her husband’s father, and her husband’s grandfather (Charles B. Alexander, Class of 1870; Henry M. Alexander, Class of 1840; and Archibald Alexander, Class of 1810). Historical Photograph Collection, Individuals Series (AC067), Box 1.

June 10, 1974—Women’s Wear Daily observes, “Students at Princeton, taking advantage of spring weather, are showing lots of leg—male and female. The big favorite for both sexes—short cutoff jeans. Most girls are keeping their skirts short. It’s okay for those with bronzed, shapely limbs, but forget about those pasty whites.”

June 13, 1755—An anonymous donor in Great Britain sends a donation of over £300 to the colony of New Jersey to establish an endowed fund for one of four possible purposes:

  • To support a missionary “among the Indians in North America”
  • To support “a pious & well qualified Schoolmaster in teaching the Indians the English language & the principles of natural and revealed religion”
  • To support the education of “a well qualified Indian Youth at the College of New Jersey…in order to his instructing his Countrymen in the English language & the Christian religion or preaching the Gospel to them,” or
  • To support the education of a student from Scotland or England at the College of New Jersey to prepare “for teaching or preaching the Gospel among the Indians in case an Indian Youth of suitable Qualifications cannot at some particular time, be obtained”

June 14, 1886—The Princetonian celebrates its tenth anniversary with a special issue detailing its early history.

For the previous installment in this series, click here.

Fact check: We always strive for accuracy, but if you believe you see an error, please contact us.

This Week in Princeton History for September 23-29

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the Princetonian complains about a change in staffing, a new kiosk is under construction, and more.

September 24, 1899—Today’s issue of Nature refers to the “Libbey Deep” off the shores of Newfoundland, newly named in honor of physical geography professor William Libbey, Class of 1877.

September 25, 1765—The Board of Trustees orders the buttery to provide bread, butter, candles, and small beer for sale to students, but prohibits sales to students of anything else.

September 26, 1878—The Princetonian complains about a change in staffing: “The men servants who last year did good service in the entries of the various dormitories, and proved such real comfort to the students, have been dismissed, and we are left to have all our work done by a few superannuated Irish women, who are required to do an immense amount of work in so short a time that they necessarily do it in a careless, partial manner, which is worse than absolute neglect.”

September 27, 1988—A new kiosk, designed by Robert Venturi ’47 to better blend in with surrounding architecture, is under construction at Princeton University’s Nassau Street entrance.

Artist’s rendering of Princeton University’s Nassau Street kiosk, found in Handbook of Information for the Administrative Staff, 1971, Historical Subject Files (AC109), Box 241, Folder 6.

For the previous installment in this series, click here.

Fact check: We always strive for accuracy, but if you believe you see an error, please contact us.

This Week in Princeton History for April 29-May 5

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, 80% of students skip class in protest, the Princetonian interviews Phillis Schlafly, and more.

April 30, 1999—The Graduate School receives a record number of applications in its first year accepting online submissions.

May 1, 1970—Roughly 80% of students skip class as part of a massive general strike in protest of the U.S. invasion of Cambodia that takes over campus activities.

Many students attended a protest at Mather Sundial rather than attending classes on May 1, 1970. Historical Photograph Collection, Campus Life Series (AC112), Box MP94, Image No. 1910.

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This Week in Princeton History for April 16-22

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a young professor dies of AIDS, the Princetonian begins publishing every other day, and more.

April 16, 1995—Assistant professor of English Walter C. Hughes, age 34, dies of AIDS.

Walter C. Hughes, ca. 1990s. Photo from the Princeton Weekly Bulletin.

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Acción Puertorriqueña and Divisions among Puerto Ricans at Princeton

By Mario Garcia ’18

Founded in 1972, Acción Puertorriqueña—later known as Acción Puertorriqueña y Amigos—was a student group initially consisting of Puerto Rican undergraduates and later allies who sought to create spaces for Puerto Rican cultures on Princeton’s campus through cultural events and student-led activism. Such celebratory events included the beginnings of Latino Graduation in 1990 and National Hispanic Heritage Month in 1989 as commemorations of the experiences of Princeton students descending from Latin American ancestry, while activist initiatives included lobbying for seminars related to Puerto Rican histories and recruitment programs for Puerto Rican students in the 1970s as strategies for empowering Puerto Rican communities on campus.

Event flyer, 1981. Carl Fields Center for Equality and Cultural Understanding Records (AC342), Box 1.

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This Week in Princeton History for December 18-24

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a newspaper’s editorial cartoon satirizes the contrast between the presidential leadership of John Maclean and James McCosh, a Princetonian becomes Senate Majority Leader, and more.

December 18, 1772—John Witherspoon writes to the New York Gazette to defend himself against charges that by praising the College of New Jersey (Princeton) he is denigrating the College of New York (most likely this refers to King’s College, which will later be renamed Columbia University). “There are many real Advantages attending a College in a large City, for the Instruction and Improvement of Youth. Should any Gentleman think fit to recommend the College of New-York, on these Accounts, pray how would it be taken if I should resent it as an Injury to the College of New-Jersey?”

December 22, 1875—The Daily Graphic runs a front-page editorial cartoon depicting the faculty of the College of New Jersey (Princeton) as the frogs, former president John Maclean as the Log King, and current president John McCosh as the Stork King in Aesop’s fable, “The Frogs who Desired a King.” Three student fraternities waving signs in the background reference recent controversies over secret societies at Princeton.

Cartoon from Daily Graphic, December 22, 1875. Click to enlarge.

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This Week in Princeton History for October 2-8

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, smoking in class comes to an end, a woman against female suffrage speaks in Alexander Hall, and more.

October 3, 1981—A hawk crashes through a window in Firestone Library, knocking a 6-inch hole in the glass. Startled students studying near the window capture the injured bird, which will ultimately be released near Lot 21.

October 4, 1960—Students protest a new rule against smoking in class.

Cartoon from the Daily Princetonian.

October 5, 1915—Minnie Bronson of the Princeton Branch of the New Jersey Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage gives an address in Alexander Hall.

October 6, 1930—The Daily Princetonian receives a note in response to a subscription postcard from Wilson Aull of the Class of 1891 accusing the paper of being “a traitor to the U. S. Constitution” because of its stand on the Eighteenth Amendment (Prohibition). Aull declines to subscribe.

For last week’s installment in this series, click here.

Fact check: We always strive for accuracy, but if you believe you see an error, please contact us.

This Week in Princeton History for June 12-18

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the Liberty Bell is in town, the first woman earns a Princeton degree, and more.

June 13, 1878—A member of the Class of 1878 writes that he is disappointed by the College of New Jersey (Princeton)’s invitation to U.S. President Rutherford B. Hayes to speak at Commencement, saying his appearance would dishonor the graduates and Commencement would be “made subservient to outsiders.” It is ultimately a moot point; Hayes declines the invitation.

College of New Jersey (Princeton) Commencement Program, 1878. Princeton University Commencement Records (AC115), Box 2, Folder 18.

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This Week in Princeton History for December 12-18

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the debate team wins its argument over football with Harvard, a yearbook cover change draws complaint, and more.

December 12, 1896—First Lady Frances Fulsom Cleveland draws student notice as she shops for a house in Princeton for her family to move into after Grover Cleveland finishes his presidency.

Frances_Cleveland_AC348_Box_1

Frances Fulsom Cleveland. Grover Cleveland Collection (AC348), Box 1.

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This Week in Princeton History for October 31-November 6

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the football team scores a historic win, the campus mourns a favorite squirrel, and more.

November 1, 1877—The Princetonian complains that everyone is annoyed “by the too boisterous singing of Freshmen” on the north end of campus.

November 3, 1888—In one of their highest scoring games in history, Princeton’s football team defeats Johns Hopkins University 104-0.

1888_football_team_1891_bric

The College of New Jersey (Princeton) football team, 1888. Photo from 1891 Bric-a-Brac.

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