This Week in Princeton History for February 11-17

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, African American women express their views of campus, police are on the lookout for stolen silverware, and more.

February 11, 1994—A group of students responds to an editorial cartoon with pleas for greater thoughtfulness about the use of imagery and language on campus, saying the cartoon’s portrayal of Cornel West *80 played to a variety of offensive stereotypes. Discussions continue throughout the week.

A follow up set of editorial cartoons from the Daily Princetonian.

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This Week in Princeton History for December 14-20

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the campus rallies around a professor targeted by a racist screed, a new library draws patrons despite a broken furnace, and more.

December 14, 1757—The College of  New Jersey (Princeton) Board of Trustees vote to send a representative to meet with the ecclesiastical council that will decide whether Jonathan Edwards may be released from his ministerial duties in Stockbridge, Massachusetts to assume the responsibilities of President of the College.

December 15, 1990–The Princeton University campus reels from news of a racist letter sent to Director of Afro-American Studies Nell Painter asserting that she “does not have the intellectual worth to teach at the college level.” Administrators, faculty, and students scramble to express their support of the history professor.

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Nell Painter, ca. 1990. Photo from the Daily Princetonian.

December 17, 1873—College of New Jersey (Princeton) President James McCosh reports that Chancellor Green Library is complete, with the exception of a non-functional furnace; the cold does not prevent the library’s use, as 26 people per day borrow books.

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Chancellor Green Library (pictured with old Dickinson Hall at left), 1873. Historical Photograph Collection, Grounds and Buildings Series (AC112), Box MP013, Image No. 327.

December 20, 1946—It’s a Wonderful Life, starring Jimmy Stewart ‘32, premieres at the Globe Theatre in New York. The Daily Princetonian will give it a positive review despite the film’s “excessive sentimentality and overwrought tension.”

For last week’s installment in this series, click here.

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This Week in Princeton History for September 21-27

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, Halle Berry talks about women and race in film, a freshman struggles to adjust, and more.

September 21, 1970—The op-ed (opposite editorial) page, pioneered by editorial page editor John R. Oakes ’34, makes its debut in the New York Times. Its intense popularity will lead to its adoption by many other newspapers.

September 22, 2000—Halle Berry is the keynote speaker at a conference entitled, “Imitating Life: Women, Race, and Film, 1934-2000,” in McCosh 50. She tells the packed audience being asked to speak was personally significant: “That invitation reminded me who I was, and that I could be proud of that person because Princeton wanted me to come speak.”

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Halle Berry speaking at the “Imitating Life: Women, Race, and Film, 1934-2000” conference, Princeton University, September 22, 2000. Photo from Office of Communications Records (AC168), Box 203. The video recording of Berry’s speech is found in the Broadcast Center Recordings (AC362), Box 8.

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