This Week in Princeton History for November 1-7

In this week’s installment of our recurring series, some alumni are not pleased that students are cross-dressing for the theater, Abraham Lincoln is the most popular candidate for president on campus, and more.

November 1, 1798—Using the “ride and tie” method and sharing one horse, Jacob Lindley and James Carnahan arrive in Princeton to begin their studies, having covered 35-40 miles per day alternately walking and riding five to ten miles each through the mountains from southwestern Pennsylvania.

November 3, 1980—Peter Chin ’81, Jacques Duranceau ’81, and Brett Hudelson ’83 take first place in team kumite at the National Karate Championships.

November 4, 1908—The Princeton Alumni Weekly writes disapprovingly of male students in Triangle Club cross-dressing to play female parts: “Certainly it does not leave with the audience an impression of that manly quality they like to ascribe to our students, a quality developed by sound minds and sound bodies.”

Richard Sanders Barbee ’07 as “Vivian Dasher” in Triangle Club’s “The Mummy Monarch,” ca. 1907. Photo from 1909 Bric-a-Brac.

November 6, 1860—Students hold their own mock election for president in Nassau Hall, although most cannot vote legally due to age and residency requirements. Abraham Lincoln of the generally antislavery Republican party receives the plurality of the votes, but not a majority. The results are as follows:

  • Abraham Lincoln (Republican)—90
  • John Bell (Constitutional Union)—75
  • John Breckinridge (Southern Democratic)—75
  • Stephen A. Douglas (Northern Democratic)—9

For the previous installment in this series, click here.

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