Who Founded Princeton University?

Q. Dear Mr. Mudd,

Who founded Princeton University? 

A. The founding of Princeton University is nearly as complex as the courses that have been and continue to be taught within its hallowed lecture halls. The College of New Jersey (as Princeton University was known until 1896) was a child of the Great Awakening, an institution born in opposition to the religious tenets that had ruled the colonial era.

The principles on which Princeton University was founded may be traced to the Log College in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, founded by William Tennent in 1726. Tennent was a Presbyterian minister who, along with fellow evangelists Theodorus Jacobus Frelinghuysen, Jonathan Edwards, Samuel Davies, and George Whitefield of England, preached and taught an approach to religion and life that was the very essence of the Great Awakening period. The seven founders of the College of New Jersey were all Presbyterians. Ebenezer Pemberton, a minister and a graduate of Harvard, was the only one of the seven who did not graduate from Yale. The remaining six were Jonathan Dickinson, Aaron Burr Sr., and John Pierson, who were ministers; William Smith, a lawyer; Peter Van Brugh Livingston, a merchant; and William Peartree Smith.

Log_college_location_1914_AC111_Box_MP062_Image_2402

Original location of Pennsylvania’s Log College (photo taken in 1914). Historical Photograph Collection, Grounds and Buildings Series (AC111), Box MP62, Image No. 2402.

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Wikipedia Edit-a-thon at Mudd Library

by: Q Miceli
A group of sixteen enthusiastic volunteers, including Princeton undergraduates, Princeton community members, Wikipedians from the Wikimedia-New York City, and Mudd Library staff, gathered in the Wiess Lounge on Saturday, 18 February 2012, to write and update Princetoniana Wikipedia articles.
Princeton_editathon_Get_the_food_1st
In July 2011, I participated in an edit-a-thon about the Armory Show at the Archives of American Art in Washington, D.C. A Wikipedia edit-a-thon is a gathering of individuals creating Wikipedia articles and uploading media related to a theme, events, subjects, or places. Once I saw firsthand how GLAM (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums) institutions and Wikipedia can benefit one another, I returned to Princeton and my student job at the Princeton University Archives inspired to act on this experience. After discussing the idea with University Archivist Dan Linke, we decided to host an edit-a-thon in February with the theme of “A Valentine for Princeton.” The goal was to have participants update pages on Princeton’s presidents and other Princetoniana materials.
Mudd_Library_Edit-a-thon_participants
On the day of the event, after introductions over pizza and Indian food, I gave a brief PowerPoint presentation describing basic principles of Wikipedia articles: notability, neutral point of view, reliable sources, and individual accountability. Reference Archivist Christie Peterson introduced the reference room and the sources available for participants to browse. After that, we were off!
Choosing_Topics

Choosing topics.
Discussing_the_finer_points_of_Wikipedia

Discussing the finer points of Wikipedia.
While writing articles about topics such as Seeley G. Mudd Library to the Putnam Collection of Sculpture to the East Asian Studies Department, and updating articles about the Log College, the Two Dickinson Street Co-op, and the Joseph Henry House, we used reference room publications and online resources to increase the number and reliability of Wikipedia articles about Princeton University.
RefRoomWriters

Princeton resident Mimi Omiecinski said about the event, “My family was so impressed that I was doing this today.” Wikimedian Pete took photos of the nearby eating clubs to update their pages. A Free Culture Chorus recorded a rendition of “Old Nassau”, and both the pictures and the recording are available on the Wikimedia Commons website for the event: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Editathon,_Princeton_University. We challenge any Princeton University a cappella group to upload an animoso version of “Old Nassau.”

By the numbers, we had:

16 attendees
6 usernames created
4 articles created
9 articles expanded

We look forward to holding more edit-a-thons in the future!

For more information:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Meetup/Princeton_University_Edit-a-thon