Nassau Lit Available Online

Founded in 1842, the Nassau Literary Review was the first student publication established at Princeton University. Thanks to a collaborative project between the Mudd Library and Princeton University Library Digital Initiatives, all issues of this publication through 2015 (nearly 50,000 pages) are now digitized and available to view online via the Papers of Princeton website.

Cover of the December 1946 issue of the Nassau Lit

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This Week in Princeton History for September 25-October 1

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the Gest East Asian Collection finds a new home, a prominent feminist argues in favor of women’s suffrage, and more.

September 25, 1760—The Board of Trustees add knowledge of “Vulgar Arithmetick” to the existing admission requirements.

September 26, 1972—The Gest East Asian Collection moves to a dedicated library of its own in Palmer Hall.

East Asian Studies graduate student Deborah Porter *89 studying in Princeton University’s Gest Library, 1985. Office of Communications Records (AC168), Box 219.

September 28, 1915—A meeting “In the Interest of Woman Suffrage” is held in Alexander Hall. The speaker, Beatrice Forbes-Robertson Hale, author of What Women Want: An Interpretation of the Feminist Movement, says, “Men and women are not equal, and as individuals never can become equal, but we do believe that they should have equality of opportunity.”

October 1, 1862—The Nassau Literary Magazine reflects on a changed campus at the College of New Jersey (Princeton): “Ours has been no ordinary college-course… we were forcibly reminded that all the terrors of a civil war were just about to burst upon us. The Southerners soon turned their backs upon these classic shades, and ’63 suffered with the rest; one after another has dropped from our number, and now scarcely half its former size the class is passing through its senior year.”

For last week’s installment in this series, click here.

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This Week in Princeton History for November 21-27

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the Princetonian defends the Class of 1883’s right to wear orange and black, intercollegiate baseball begins, and more.

November 21, 1879—The Princetonian defends the freshman Class of 1883 against charges that they should not be allowed to wear orange and black, made on the grounds that only football players should be permitted to do so.

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This Week in Princeton History for April 4-10

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, Betty Friedan is on campus, the school chooses an official shade of orange, and more.

April 5, 1895—In a letter to the editor of the Daily Princetonian, the editorial board of the Nassau Lit defends their controversial decision to change the cover of the magazine for the first time in decades. In response to outcry from students and alumni, they will return to the original cover in May.

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