This Week in Princeton History for December 10-16

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a graduate receives his second Nobel Prize, a Native American member of the Class of 1762 complains of “too much confinement” in Nassau Hall, and more.

December 10, 1972—John Bardeen *36 accepts his second Nobel Prize in physics and becomes the only two-time laureate in the same field.

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To honor of the accomplishments of John Bardeen *36, Princeton University chose him as the first recipient of the James Madison medal in 1973. Note that the graduation year on the medallion is incorrect. Bardeen earned his Ph.D. in 1936, not 1939. Princeton University Memorabilia Collection (AC053), Box E-1. Photos by April C. Armstrong.
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This Week in Princeton History for October 9-15

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a professor wins the Nobel Prize for Medicine, the Princetonian complains about taking lecture notes, and more.

October 10, 1995—Molecular biology professor Eric Wieschaus has won the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his genetic research with Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies). Seeming overwhelmed, Wieschaus tells reporters at a press conference, “The knowledge that I can go into a lab and do (experiments) and still have a reasonable success rate—that’s the greater pleasure for me than getting the award. It’s just being a scientist. …You will know something nobody else has ever known before, and that’s a great feeling.”

Eric Wieschaus at a press conference the day after winning the Nobel Prize in Medicine, October 10, 1995. Historical Photograph Collection, Individuals Series (AC067), Box AD15, Folder 52.

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This Week in Princeton History for October 12-18

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, graduates get high praise for writing skills, influenza severely disrupts life on campus, and more.

October 13, 1748—The Trustees of the College of New Jersey send an effusive letter of thanks to Governor Jonathan Belcher for granting the institution’s second charter, “not doubting but by the Smiles of Heaven, under your Protection, it may prove a flourishing Seminary of Piety and good Literature” and “a lasting Foundation for the future Prosperity of Church and State.”

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Pennsylvania Gazette, November 3, 1748. Princeton University Publications Collection (AC364), Box 36.

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This Week in Princeton History for October 6-12

For last week’s installment in our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its students and alumni, click here.

For the week of October 6-12:

Toni Morrison is named a Nobel Laureate, an undergrad gets international attention for a physics paper, and more.

October 6, 1938—Princeton University is selected as one of the world’s libraries holding the Westinghouse Time Capsule Book of Record. The Westinghouse Time Capsule is scheduled to be opened in the year 5939. Those who would like to read the book can find it at Firestone Library.

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Some of the contents of the Westinghouse Time Capsule before being packed in Bloomfield, New Jersey, 1938. Photo from the G. Edward Pendray Papers (MC105), Box 53.

October 7, 1993—English professor Toni Morrison is the first African-American to be chosen as the Nobel Laureate in literature.

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Toni Morrison celebrates her Nobel Prize win, 1993. Photo from Office of Communications Records (AC168), Box 192, Folder 64.

October 9, 1976—The New York Times reports that anti-nuclear activist and Princeton Tiger mascot John Aristotle Phillips ’78 has designed a workable atom bomb using unclassified information for his independent physics project, with the goal of drawing attention to America’s weaknesses to terrorist threats. This will bring Phillips significant notoriety, and result in his own paper being classified by the U.S. government (and it will therefore not be available in the Princeton archives). France and Pakistan will both offer to buy Phillips’s paper, but Phillips will refuse to sell.

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John Aristotle Phillips ’78 (center) during an appearance on the game show “To Tell the Truth.” Photo by Peter Michaelis for the Princeton Alumni Weekly.

October 10, 1920—The reorganized University band debuts as 20 students in black sweaters and white flannels play at halftime of the Maryland football game.

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