This Week in Princeton History for October 18-24

In this week’s installment of our recurring series, students are taking a new kind of exam, a play written by a member of the Class of 1883 debuts on Broadway, and more.

October 19, 1859—The Princeton Standard reports on a new innovation at Princeton College: Closed-note, written exams.

October 21, 1896—As part of the Sequicentennial celebration at the institution formerly known as the College of New Jersey, Princeton University’s Class of 1861 meets for their 35th anniversary reunion.

The cover of the Princeton Class of 1861′s menu for the Sesquicentennial celebration in 1896. During this celebration of Princeton’s 150th year, the College of New Jersey, colloquially known as Princeton College, officially took the name “Princeton University.” Many classes returned to campus for the festivities. The entire menu can be viewed on our Tumblr page. Princeton University Class Records (AC130), Box 5.

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This Week in Princeton History for October 17-23

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a junior is arrested for anti-censorship activism in South Africa, the school celebrates the 150th anniversary of its founding, and more.

October 17, 1967—Bob Durkee ’69’s in-depth award-winning article, “A New Era for the Negro at Princeton,” first appears in the Daily Princetonian.

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Clipping from the Daily Princetonian.

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When Did the College of New Jersey Change to Princeton University?

Q: Dear Mr. Mudd,

When and why did the College of  New Jersey change its name to Princeton University?

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Sesquicentennial Archway, Princeton, New Jersey, October 1896. Historical Photograph Collection, Campus Life Series (AC112), Box LP19, Image No. 1387.

A: The College of New Jersey, founded in 1746, changed its name to Princeton University during the culmination of the institution’s Sesquicentennial Celebration in 1896. Historically, the University was often referred to as “Nassau,” “Nassau Hall,” “Princeton College,” or “Old North.” Continue reading