This Week in Princeton History for January 17-23

In this week’s installment of our recurring series, heavy snow holds up the mail, the McCosh family host a party for students, and more.

January 17, 1995—Paul Muldoon, director of the Creative Writing Program, wins the T. S. Eliot Prize for Poetry.

January 18, 1796—Israel Crane (Class of 1797) complains to the faculty that “Mr. Harvey of the same class” “laid a nuisance at his door last Saturday night.” The faculty agree to investigate.

January 19, 1836—The Boston Traveler reports that it took 10 horses and 10 men four hours to get from Kingston to Princeton to deliver the mail (about 3 miles) because of the heavy snow.

January 23, 1879—Isabella and James McCosh have the senior class over to their new house. Local women, as well as some from out of town, assist with hosting the reception. The students are especially impressed with the mansion’s library.

Home of Isabella and James McCosh, ca. 1880s. Historical Photograph Collection, Campus Life Series (AC111), Box SP05, Image 1240.

For the previous installment in this series, click here.

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This Week in Princeton History for February 3-9

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the last winter Commencement is held, a woman successfully bickers an Eating Club for the first time, and more.

February 3, 1949—Princeton holds its sixth and last winter Commencement, presenting 274 degrees. Frank Osborn, Class of 1910, tells the assembled graduates, “we are forced to realize that the world is a dangerous place to live in. That’s a new idea for my generation. We don’t like it.”

Frank Osborn with Harold Dodds at Princeton University’s Feburary 2, 1949 Winter Commencement. Photo from Princeton Alumni Weekly, March 19, 1949. Osborn’s speech can be found in the Princeton University Commencement Records (AC115).

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This Week in Princeton History for December 17-23

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a shipment of coal mitigates a fuel shortage, the Triangle Club performs for Eleanor Roosevelt, and more.

December 17, 1917—A new shipment of coal just after the last bit available ran out means there will be enough fuel on hand to last the winter, bringing relief to concerned Princetonians. Measures will still need to be taken to preserve it.

Clipping from the Daily Princetonian, December 19, 1917.

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