This Week in Princeton History for April 4-10

In this week’s installment of our recurring series, students receive word that the U.S. president has died, a faculty member applies for admission as an undergraduate, and more.

April 5, 1841—Local residents receive word that United States President William Henry Harrison has died. In accordance with their usual custom, students will wear mourning badges for 30 days.

April 7, 1886—A bulletin posted on Nassau Street reads, “No base-ball game to-day. Humidity prevents.”

April 8, 1970—Helena Novakova, a visiting lecturer in Slavic languages and literatures who has already taught two courses, fills out a transfer application in the registrar’s office. She will be accepted as a junior Russian major in the Class of 1972, which will enable her to renew her visa and stay in the United States. It remains unsafe to return to Czechoslovakia following the Russian invasion.

Helena Novakova ’72 with tennis coach Eve Craft, ca. 1972. As a Princeton University undergraduate, Novakova was captain of the undefeated women’s tennis team. Undergraduate Alumni Records (AC199).

April 10, 1912—Beginning with today’s game with Lehigh, at athletic events on campus the Bureau of Self-Help will sell new score cards that they have published. The 5-cent sales will be used to help the members of the Bureau pay their educational expenses.

For the previous installment in this series, click here.

Fact check: We always strive for accuracy, but if you believe you see an error, please contact us.

This Week in Princeton History for August 19-25

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, a sophomore watches as the USSR invades Czechoslovakia, a junior unseats a 15-time golf champion, and more.

August 19, 1887—Princeton professor Charles Augustus Young is leading an expedition to Moscow to view a total solar eclipse.

August 20, 1968—Stephen Fuzesi ’70 watches from the balcony of the Hotel Intertourist in Uzsgorod, stunned, as Soviet tanks invade Czechoslovakia to crush the “Prague Spring.” Fuzesi will later write, “The realistic Czechs were now victims of an innocent but naïve interpretation of their own fate. However, we were naïve all over the world.”

August 23, 1958—The Winnipeg Tribune reports that a group of tourists, four young men from Princeton and Yale, have arrived in the Port of Churchill by canoeing from The Pas.

August 25, 1996—Mary Moan ’97 wins the Pennsylvania State Women’s Amateur Championship, beating former U.S. Women’s and British Amateur Open winner Carol Semple-Thompson for the title in a stunning upset. (Thompson has previously won the Pennsylvania competition 15 times.)

Mary Moan ’97. Undergraduate Alumni Files (AC198).

For the previous installment in this series, click here.

Fact check: We always strive for accuracy, but if you believe you see an error, please contact us.