New Accession: Atomic-bombed Roof Tiles from Hiroshima University

The University Archives was recently given the honor and responsibility of providing a home for seven roof tiles that sustained damage in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, Japan on August 6, 1945.  The roof tiles were collected in a river bed near ground zero of the atomic bomb explosion.

3 of the 7 tiles.

3 of the 7 tiles.

Along with the roof tiles, the donation includes photographs of the location where the tiles were recovered; booklets and pamphlets on the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and documents related to the artifacts.

Hiroshima University was decimated in the atomic bomb attack— most of its students and faculty members perished and its buildings were demolished.  In the post-war period, Hiroshima University’s president Tatsuo Morito reached out to universities world-wide to help to renew the institution by sending books for its library and saplings to bring its grounds back to life.

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Princeton was among the schools that responded in 1951 by providing both a book for the library’s collection and a monetary donation for the purchase of a native tree for the campus; and now, in celebration of its 80th anniversary, Hiroshima University is reciprocating by donating these artifacts.

The roof tiles are distributed by Hiroshima University’s Association for Sending Atomic-bombed Roof Tiles in order to perpetuate awareness of the devastating effects of the atomic bombings in Japan, and to oppose the use and proliferation of nuclear weapons.  In a letter that accompanies the donation, Toshimasa Asahara, President of Hiroshima University, explains:

The threat of nuclear weapons still exists in many areas of the world.  It is our earnest desire, however, that the pain and sadness experienced in Hiroshima not be re-created anywhere else in the world.

This wish is not only the wish of those of us living today but represents the silent voices of the 240,000 Hiroshima citizens who perished from the atomic bomb.  We believe it is also the will of others such as yourselves who will work together with us to build a peaceful future for the world.

See the Atomic-bombed Roof Tiles from Hiroshima University Finding Aid

 

 

 

 

 

Senior Theses to Go Digital in 2013

Access to the most frequently used collection at the Mudd Manuscript Library—the Senior Thesis Collection—will be greatly enhanced in 2013 as we transition from collecting paper copies to electronic copies (PDFs) of theses.  Dean of the College Valerie Smith has approved a plan for senior theses to be available online (but limited to the Princeton University community) through Princeton’s digital repository, DataSpace.

To this end, next summer DataSpace will become the main search interface for all theses.  Senior theses submitted in 2013 and in the future will be available only electronically (but limited to the Princeton University domain), while senior theses submitted in 2012 and before will be available in paper format at the Mudd Manuscript Library, as they are today.  In the second phase of the project, PDFs of legacy senior theses will be added to DataSpace as they are scanned for patrons, which will incrementally grow the number of theses available digitally.

“The senior thesis has a long history at Princeton,” said University Archivist Dan Linke. “This is just the next chapter for this important aspect of a Princeton education.”

The submission process for academic departments will evolve as we move to PDFs—all of the data entry and uploading will be done through a simple online form. Staff in the academic departments will do the initial data entry and uploading, and Library staff will make a final check and then release the theses to DataSpace. Training on the new process will be offered in the winter of 2013 and will include online videos as well as in-person demonstrations at the Mudd Manuscript Library.

Questions about the new process can be directed to the University Archivist, Dan Linke (609.258.5879; mudd@princeton.edu).

University Records Manager joins the Princeton University Archives staff

On January 3, 2011 we welcomed Anne Marie Phillips to the Princeton University Archives staff. Anne Marie is Princeton’s first University Records Manager, her appointment underscoring Princeton’s commitment to maintaining its records at a level of quality that will best support the work of the University and ensure the comprehensive documentation of Princeton’s history. Though part of the Archives, Anne Marie’s portfolio is to serve the entire University community’s records needs.

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Anne Marie is responsible for expanding and improving Princeton’s current records management program, which was created in conjunction with the Office of General Counsel and other University administrative units, and consists of records transfer information and procedures, as well as a General Records Schedule. Records transferred to the Mudd Manuscript Library are accessioned, processed, and made available as a component of the University Archives function of Mudd. Anne Marie will be updating and expanding the General Records Schedule, creating specialized schedules for records that are unique to various administrative units, and developing and providing a constellation of policies, procedures, and services that will make it easier for University staff to determine what to do with the records they create and use as they perform their jobs.

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New Accessions: April-June 2010

The Mudd Manuscript Library received 12 public policy accessions and 30 University Archives accessions between April and June 2010.

The public policy collections received significant additions to the American Civil Liberties Union Records and the Council on Foreign Relations Records. In addition, a wonderful surprise was the receipt of Woodrow Wilson’s and Edith Bolling Galt’s marriage license, 1915. The item was donated by Mr. Barry C. Keenan of Granville, OH, who also confessed to having caused the green ink stain on the document as a ten-year-old.

Wilson marriage license

On the University Archives side, the Library received the papers of two important Princeton figures– Dr. Carl. A. Fields and Dean Mathey.
Educator and advocate of minority education, Dr. Carl A. Fields was assistant dean of student aid at Princeton University and later served in various other leadership positions outside the University. The Carl A. Fields Papers consist of correspondence, reports, research material on race relations and minority education, handwritten notes, project proposals, and other papers that document his life and active career. An online finding aid for this collection is available at: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/5138jd936.
Dean Mathey, Class of 1912, was a member of the Board of Trustees and an ardent supporter of the University. The collection documents Mathey’s familial relationships, his service to Princeton, his tennis career and other activities from his undergraduate days to the end of his life. A finding aid is for this collection is in process.
The following is a complete list of materials that were accessioned between April and June of 2010. As always, if you would like additional information about these materials, please contact us through our general email account at mudd@princeton.edu.

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