This Week in Princeton History for September 20-26

In this week’s installment of our recurring series, residents of Baker Rink are asked to notify the Prince of their bunk numbers for subscription deliveries, Americans are questioning Princeton’s decision to hold a funeral for Aaron Burr, and more.

September 21, 1999—Peter Singer’s first day of teaching is marked by protest, as 14 demonstrators are arrested and dragged away from Nassau Hall after blocking its entrances for two hours.

Clipping from the Daily Princetonian.

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This Week in Princeton History for March 8-14

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, many feel the CPUC’s response to homophobic violence is unsatisfactory, a graduate student vows to sue the town for his disenfranchisement, and more.

March 8, 1802—The Philadelphia Gazette reports that, due to a recent fire in Nassau Hall, classes at Princeton will be suspended until next May or June.

March 9, 1976—Students are not satisfied with the compromise measure passed by the Council on the Princeton University Community that calls for an affirmation of university policies of non-discrimination and protection of freedom of expression but does not address suppression of free expression through violence or affirm non-discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. The CPUC’s action is taken in response to recent targeted acts against the Gay Alliance of Princeton.

Prospect, an alumni magazine dedicated to repudiating Princeton’s late-20th century transformation into a more inclusive community, covered the controversy over the Gay Alliance of Princeton in its March 15, 1976 issue.

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This Week in Princeton History for February 15-21

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the Class of 1899 dons mourning clothes, protesters urge an end to sweatshop labor, and more.

February 15, 1899—To honor Ralph Wilson Simonds, formerly a member of their class, the Class of 1899 will wear mourning crépe for a period of twenty days beginning on this day. Simonds died fighting in the Spanish-American War in the Philippines. Simonds is the third member of the Class of 1899 to have died before graduation; a fourth will follow a few months later.

February 16, 1999—About 250 protesters march from Firestone Plaza to Nassau Hall urging an end to sweatshop labor in the production of Princeton-licensed apparel.

Protesters march toward Nassau Hall to urge an end to sweatshop labor in the production of Princeton-licensed apparel. Photo from the Daily Princetonian.

February 17, 1883—A number of students are delinquent on their poll tax payments.

February 19, 1985—The speech by former president Gerald Ford the Undergraduate Student Government attempted to arrange will not take place today because the administration has said Ford’s $13,500 honorarium is too expensive for a single speech.

For the previous installment in this series, click here.

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