This Week in Princeton History for December 11-17

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, an atomic bomb survivor speaks on campus, a numismatist gives a lecture to women in town about an archaeological dig, and more.

December 11, 1995—Hiroshima bombing survivor Michiko Yamaoka tells an audience in a crowded McCormick 101 about her experience with the world’s first nuclear attack and its aftermath and why she believes the weapons must never be used. Saying her hatred for the United States and Japan for going to war has been replaced by a hatred for war itself, she instead urges communication. “I realized how important it was to meet people across boundaries that had separated us, to have a meeting of the hearts.”

Melted roof tile from Hiroshima University. Atomic-Bombed Roof Tiles from Hiroshima University (AC408), Box 1. To read more about the impact of the blast in Hirsohima, see our previous blog post. To learn more about Princeton University’s involvement in the development of the atomic bomb, visit our current exhibition on display through June 2018.

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This Week in Princeton History for November 13-19

In this week’s installment of our ongoing series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the first football season concludes, the Graduate Student Union holds its first meeting, and more.

November 13, 1869—The first college football season ever finishes with a game at Princeton, who defeats Rutgers 8 to 0. (A game planned for November 27 will not be played, because the faculty of both Princeton and Rutgers feel the contests are interfering too much with the students’ coursework.)

Early football at Princeton bore greater resemblance to soccer than rugby, including the use of a spherical ball rather than an oval, as seen in this College of New Jersey (Princeton) 1873 team photo. Historical Photograph Collection, Campus Life Series (AC112), Box LP036, Image No. 2522.

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