Public interest in climate change unshaken by scandal, but unstirred by science (Environ. Res. Lett.)

By Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications The good news for any passionate supporter of climate-change science is that negative media reports seem to have only a passing effect on public opinion, according to Princeton University and University of Oxford researchers. The bad news is that positive stories don't appear to possess much staying power, either. … Continue reading Public interest in climate change unshaken by scandal, but unstirred by science (Environ. Res. Lett.)

Unlocking the potential of bacterial gene clusters to discover new antibiotics (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.)

by Tien Nguyen, Department of Chemistry Resistance to antibiotics has been steadily rising and poses a serious threat to the stronghold of existing treatments. Now, a method from Mohammad Seyedsayamdost, an assistant professor of chemistry at Princeton University, may open the door to the discovery of a host of potential drug candidates. The vast majority … Continue reading Unlocking the potential of bacterial gene clusters to discover new antibiotics (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.)

Why a bacterium got its curve — and why biologists should know (Nature Communications)

By Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications Drawing from his engineering background, Princeton University researcher Alexandre Persat had a notion as to why the bacteria Caulobacter crescentus are curved — a hunch that now could lead to a new way of studying the evolution of bacteria, according to research published in the journal Nature Communications. Commonly … Continue reading Why a bacterium got its curve — and why biologists should know (Nature Communications)