Grody ’11 Is Music Director of a New York Premiere

TGI PosterPlay: The Great Immensity, a musical play about climate change by the investigative theater company The Civilians. Andrea Grody ’11 is the music director. The show is written and directed by Steven Cosson and songs are by Michael Friedman.

Dates and location: Through May 1, at the Public Theater, 425 Lafayette Street, New York, N.Y.

The music director: As a student at Princeton, Grody was music director of the work-in-progress production of The Great Immensity at the Berlind Theatre. Today she is a musical-theater artist in New York City. The musical she wrote, Strange Faces, about young people with Asperger’s syndrome, received readings last summer.  Continue reading

#ThrowbackThursday: Einstein in Princeton

The March 23, 1951, issue of PAW. Click to Enlarge.

The March 23, 1951, issue of PAW. Click to Enlarge.

Before Albert Einstein made his first visit to Princeton, to deliver the Stafford Little Lectures in May 1921, few in the United States knew much about the man, beyond what had been written of his work. As PAW explained in a brief preview, “We are apt to think of such an eminent scientist as Dr. Einstein as a man advanced in years, and no doubt most Americans were surprised to learn that he is but slightly over 40. … He has said that Princeton is the one American university at which he especially desires to speak, because more has been done here in relation to his theory than at any other place in the United States.” Continue reading

Tiger of the Week: Tom Finkelpearl ’79, New York’s New Cultural Affairs Commissioner

For the last 12 years, Tom Finkelpearl ’79 has been an advocate for arts outreach in Queens as president and executive director of the Queens Museum. This month, he received the opportunity to expand his reach to all five boroughs as New York City’s commissioner of cultural affairs, an appointment announced by Mayor Bill de Blasio on April 7.

Finkelpearl’s work at the Queens Museum was a major factor in de Blasio’s choice. “When you’re making a choice on someone to lead an agency, you need vision and you need the ability to follow through in action,” he said at a news conference. “And Tom Finkelpearl proved to me that he knew how to do both.”

Finkelpearl, in remarks at the same event, noted that while New York City profits economically as a magnet for those who appreciate art and culture, the arts also have social value for the city’s communities. “And I think that this is an argument that hasn’t been well made by the city,” he said. “But if you look again, what happens on the community level with artists in all the neighborhoods of New York City, there’s something extremely valuable, moving, that’s good for communities. And I intend to try to understand how we can best express that value.”

WATCH the full news conference below, courtesy of the New York City Mayor’s Office.

Marcoux ’91 Chosen as Next Athletic Director

Mollie Marcoux ’91, a sports and recreation executive and former two-sport athlete at Princeton, was introduced as the University’s next athletic director in a press conference at Jadwin Gym April 15. Marcoux, who will take the helm as the Ford Family Director of Athletics in August, will be the first woman to lead the department, which includes 38 men’s and women’s varsity teams.

President Eisgruber ’83 made the announcement, hailing Marcoux’s 19 years of experience at Chelsea Piers Management in New York and Connecticut; her time as a coach and administrator at the Lawrenceville School; and her contributions as a student-athlete at Princeton, where she excelled in ice hockey and soccer and graduated cum laude from the history department.

“She is an ideal leader for our athletics program,” Eisgruber said. “She understands, because she has lived it, the commitment that Princeton makes to ensure that the term scholar-athlete bears equal weight on both sides of the hyphen.” Continue reading

Men’s Golf Falls Short in Bid to Win Home Tourney

Yale had taken home the title from the Princeton Invitational in four consecutive years, but this year, that streak came to an end as another Ivy rival, Harvard, finished three shots ahead of the Bulldogs to claim the top spot.  Meanwhile, the host Tigers ended the weekend ninth out of the 15 teams in the three-round event at Springdale Golf Club.

Greg Jarmas ’14 (Office of Athletic Communications)

Greg Jarmas ’14 (Office of Athletic Communications)

Led by senior Greg Jarmas, the Tigers completed round one on Saturday with Jarmas and senior Nick Ricci sitting among the top 15 in the standings.  Jarmas would cut four shots off of his first-round score to shoot a 66 in the second round on Saturday, tying for the lowest score of the day and placing him in a tie for second place and three shots back of the lead going into Sunday’s final round. He would ultimately finish 12th.

“The difference between who moves up and who moves back in a tight race almost always comes down to putting, especially at Springdale,” Jarmas said.  “The guys who make just a couple more makeable putts will come out on top.”

Jarmas was named All-Ivy League in 2013 after becoming Princeton’s first Ivy individual champion since 2005.  Jarmas also was the Tigers’ highest finisher at NCAA Regionals. The Princeton Invitational was the first — and only — home event of the spring for men’s golf. Continue reading

Goldstein *77 Imagines Plato Today

Rebecca Newberger Goldstein *77 (Steven Pinker)

Rebecca Newberger Goldstein *77 (Steven Pinker)

Plato at the Googleplex, by Rebecca Newberger Goldstein *77 (Pantheon)

The author: Goldstein is a novelist and philosopher who has been the recipient of a MacArthur “genius” award, recognized as the Humanist of the Year by the American Humanist Association, and elected to the Academy of Arts and Sciences. She also is the author of six novels, two studies, and a number of short stories and essays.

The book: What would happen if Plato were to reappear in the 21st century as an author on a nation-wide book tour? What would he say about crowd-sourcing at the Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif.? About child-rearing during a panel conversation with a “tiger mom” and a Freudian psychoanalyst? Or about personal identity and free will while getting a brain scan in the cognitive neuroscience lab of a prestigious university? Plato explores these topics with people he meets on the book tour in modern-day Platonic dialogues that Publishers’ Weekly called “entertaining and accessible.” Goldstein weaves passages from Plato’s actual writings into the conversations and provides an exploration of Plato’s ideas. Continue reading