Adel Mahmoud

Adel Mahmoud, lecturer with the rank of professor in molecular biology and international affairs, Woodrow Wilson School, died June 11, 2018

26 thoughts on “Adel Mahmoud

  1. Hesham Sadek

    Adel was my mentor, role model and friend. Words can not begin to describe the impact he has had on me both personally and professionally. I will remain eternally grateful that I’ve had the privilege of knowing him.

  2. Sarah Santucci

    Professor Mahmoud was the very best of what a scholar could be, one who gathered vast knowledge, pushed boundaries with his research, and paired scientific advancement with global policy improvement. Importantly for me, he was also the most generous, caring teacher and mentor. He will be sorely missed by his students, the entire Princeton community, and the world.

  3. Peter Hotez

    Adel was a mentor, friend, and colleague. He was one of my first supporters and champions when I proposed to develop vaccines for hookworm and schistosomiasis, and in later years was an ardent supporter of my vaccine policy and advocacy efforts. Adel also had an infectious enthusiasm and great sense of humor he was also passionate about Egypt and the Middle East. When I was tapped as US Science Envoy in the Obama Administration he gave me great courage and advice! I will miss him a lot.

  4. Ben Tiede

    Having the privilege to have spent 23 years in school, I was exposed to somewhere around 200 teachers. And yet, I can count four that profoundly changed my trajectory as a student and a person. Adel was one of those four.

    So much of my passion for public health is a credit to Adel. As a student of both science and public policy, he thought a most valuable lesson in a uniquely sincere yet provocative way: how to question conventional wisdom. Adel opened so many doors for me, connecting me to world leading scientists, CEOs, leaders of charitable foundations and so many more.

    Beyond his prowess as a great teacher, Adel had a personality and wit like no other. In a world where the term is over-used, he was truly ‘one-of-a-kind’.

    I have come to appreciate this first hand as I’ve traveled the world and met friends, colleagues and former students of Adel everywhere from Tanzania to Washington DC to Vietnam to London and beyond. Every time I meet one of these people and tell them I was a student of Adel’s, it unlocks an instant fraternity, as if in knowing him we were all in on some special secret.

    Every time I travel to Geneva and see the Jet d’Eau or watch one of my children be vaccinated, I cannot help but think of Adel and the impact he had. While I consider myself lucky to have been one of his first students at Princeton, I know there are thousands more who were directly influenced by him. More importantly, there are literally millions around the world whose lives are better because of him but may never know his name.

  5. Ian Spatz

    I had the privilege and honor to work with Adel at Merck. He was inspiring, bold, forward thinking, and, most of all, a true gentle man. He made me smile and made me think. As a Woodrow Wilson School graduate (*81), I share my condolences with the Princeton community that was so fortunate to have him as a member.

  6. jess deutsch

    Adel Mahmoud was so good, and so great. I got to know him when I was working as an advisor to Princeton’s pre-med students, because he chaired our Committee on the Health Professions. We could not have had a more esteemed role model for our students, or one who better epitomized the highest and most important values of his profession. But maybe even more than that, and that is saying a lot, he was for me and for the students connected to him, the kindest, most thoughtful, and most compassionate mentor possible. As busy and engaged in enormously important work as he was, he MADE TIME to listen, to care, to be very deeply present one on one. That is so rare, and such a gift. I am truly sad to lose him, and honored that I spent even a little bit of time in his quite inimitable presence.

  7. Michael Clarke

    Adel’s book, “Schistosomiasis”, was the inspiration that helped formed my career in parasitology. When I had the great pleasure to meet him at a Bellagio meeting in 2012 it was for me like meeting my rock star – but a humble, humorous and somewhat shy rock star. His work has inspired many others as well, both in the field of schisto and well beyond. He will be missed.

  8. Leslie Clarke

    To say I am stunned and saddened at this news is an understatement and I am in tears. Adel was a beloved colleague and friend at University Hospitals of Cleveland. It was a joy to meet him in the hallway where we had our personal ritual of bowing to each other…always put a smile on my face as he always had that mischievous smile on his. I was honored to know both Adel and Sally and only recently saw them at a presentation at Case Western Reserve University. A more gracious, brilliant, and dignified gentleman and physician just doesn’t exist. Dr. Mahmoud will truly be missed. My deepest sympathy to his family and may it bring some comfort to them to know many others are grieving with them and remember Adel with eternal love and fondness. Sincere condolences to his friends and colleagues all over the world , Leslie C

  9. Roger B Chaffee

    Dr. Mahmoud was the Chief of Medicine during the year that John Aucott and I were chief residents at UH of Cleveland. He was the perfect mentor; funny, kind, supportive, encouraging. I really loved him. My only regret working with him is that I did not let him know how much I loved working with him. I think of him often, remembering the great advice that he gave me. I am a better person and physician having worked with him. I pray that his wife Sally, also a fantastic physician, is doing as well as possible. Thank you Dr. Mahmoud for everything! You left a great legacy. Roger B Chaffee

  10. G. Richard Olds

    Adel Mahmoud was my mentor, role
    model and friend for all of my professional life. I started working with Adel as a first year medical student at CWRU and owe my carrier in Tropical Medicine to him. He was instrumental in getting me into the MGH for residency, I returned to Cleveland to be one of his first fellows, he hired me into my first faculty job and I worked in schistosomiasis research for much of my academic life all because Adel invested his time, patients and energy in a young medical student with almost no science background.
    It was also a great pleaseure to have worked with Sally very early in her carrier. She followed me as ID fellow, Chief Resident and Junior Faculty at CWRU. They were a truly dynamic couple.
    Adel was an amazing man for more than just his outstanding contributions to science which others have already commented on. If he had stayed in Egypt he might have been President. He used to correct the English on my manuscripts and that was his third language! He was never satisfied with “good enough”. For Adel it had to be perfect. He once made me rewrite a paper 23 times till I got it right. He cared deeply about his students, faculty, and friends in a very special way. He always made people feel special and insisted you be the best you could be.
    Adel will be missed by many but I would not be the person I am today without a lot of help from him. The world was a better place because Adel was in it.

  11. Ben Tiede

    Having the privilege to have spent 23 years in school, I was exposed to somewhere around 200 teachers. And yet, I can count four that profoundly changed my trajectory as a student and a person. Adel was one of those four.

    So much of my passion for public health is a credit to Adel. As a student of both science and public policy, he thought a most valuable lesson in a uniquely sincere yet provocative way: how to question conventional wisdom. Adel opened doors for me, connecting me to world leading scientists, CEOs, leaders of charitable foundations and so many more. Despite his vastly more impressive background, he always made me feel as if I were the accomplished one.

    Beyond his prowess as a great teacher, Adel had a personality and wit like no other. In a world where the term is over-used, he was truly ‘one-of-a-kind’.

    I have come to appreciate this first hand as I’ve traveled the world and met friends, colleagues and former students of Adel everywhere from Tanzania to Washington DC to Vietnam to London and beyond. Every time I meet one of these people and tell them I was a student of Adel’s, it unlocks an instant fraternity, as if in knowing him we were all in on some special secret.

    Every time I travel to Geneva and see the Jet d’Eau or watch one of my children be vaccinated, I cannot help but think of Adel and the impact he had. While I consider myself lucky to have been one of his first students at Princeton, I know there are thousands more who were directly influenced by him. More importantly, there are literally millions around the world whose lives are better because of him but may never know his name.

  12. Michael Kochis

    Professor Mahmoud was a defining feature of my Princeton experience and made a tremendous impact on my place in and outlook on the world today. It was an absolute privilege to have him as a professor and especially my thesis advisor. He encouraged me to pursue my scientific interests with the utmost rigor while also challenging me to think about broader social, economic, and political issues related to them. His connections within the global health community allowed me to complete a project abroad I would have never imagined being able to do. Furthermore, his experience and willingness to “tell me like it is” was a true asset throughout my medical school applications, and I was proud to keep in touch with him over the years. As accomplished as he was, I was always impressed by his accessibility to his students, not only inviting us to his house, but even coming to Spelman for a dinner party my friends and I hosted. His keen mind, sage guidance, and warm heart will be missed.

  13. Adjoa Mante

    Professor Mahmoud was one of my favorite Princeton professors and although I never had the pleasure of being in one of his classes, he served as my mentor through the Global Health Scholars program. His challenging pointed questions and sharp wit made each of our group’s dinners equal parts entertaining and enriching. He encouraged us to address nuance and complexity in our thesis work, always pushing us to dig deeper. During dinners and casual discussions, it was clear that Professor Mahmoud cared about getting to know me as a whole person, not just as a student or scholar. I am so thankful to have known Professor Mahmoud and pray for comfort and healing over all the lives he’s touched.

  14. Steven Bass

    It with great sadness that I learned of Dr Mahmoud ‘s death.
    I knew him when I was a trainee and fellow at Case. He lit up the room merely by his presence. His smile and laughter were contagious.
    What a loss

  15. Victoria A Cargill

    Dr Mahmoud was the Chief of Medicine during much of my time at Case Western Reserve University Hospitals. He was brilliant, funny, insightful and doggedly determined when motivating a faculty member to do more. He knew when to motivate and encourage by praise and when to push with some firm prodding!! I always remember the concern he showed during my transition to NIH and more importantly his support of my work – believing a junior faculty person could make a difference in the community, and with his support I did. He is one of a tight circle of mentors who helped me to become more than I ever envisioned and for that I will always be grateful. My thoughts are with Sally and Jay. I’ve shed many tears at this news, not just because of this great loss, but because I’m not sure he ever realized how great an effect he had on me and how much I appreciated him. I remain thankful for the chance to know him and to be pushed to do more by him.

  16. Joel Breman

    To honor Adel, this week I am wearing my cherished Tropical and Geographic Medicine tie to speak to students in a vaccinology course at George Washington University. Adel sent me that tie in appreciation for authoring two chapters in his (and Ken Warren’s) fine book titled TGM. We first met in 1970 at the London School. While enrolled in different courses, we were both there for the faculty, which had vast and deep field experience in the tropics–and to enjoy an unsurpassed cultural milieu. Years later, Adel wrote a chapter for a book I co-authored titled Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries. He explained how it takes over 10 years and $800 million dollars to bring one vaccine or biological product to market, if successful. Adel brought a half dozen new vaccines into common use during his reign at Merck Vaccines. A large segment of the world’s population has immunity to vaccine-preventable diseases having received products that Adel brought forward using his inimitable scientific, managerial, and interpersonal skills. That is his greatest public health legacy and I thank Adel, his family, and colleagues for this achievement. Joel Breman

  17. Richard Greenberg

    Dr. Adel Mahmoud was Chief of Medicine at Case Western Reserve/University Hospitals of Cleveland during my internal medicine residency (1990-1993). He was an inspiring educator and role model for the development of physicians in training. I will always recall his kindness, generosity, and encouragement. He valued and treated us all with respect. He would welcome the medical house officers into his beautiful home overlooking Lake Erie. He had wonderful taste in art and decoration among his many other talents. I am grateful for his guidance in my growth as a physician. Healthcare and science will long benefit from his legacy.

  18. Kristin Schwab

    Dr Mahmoud was the first and best mentor I ever had. When I think of my time at Princeton, he is such a defining part — and he has impacted my life in more ways than I can put into words. His intelligence, his wit, his laugh, his love of good food, his dedication to his students, his passion for global health — he was a remarkable person and has left such an impact. Thank you for all that you have done, Dr Mahmoud.

  19. Mathias Esmann

    I had the honor of being an Adel Mahmoud Global Health Scholar. Dr. Mahmoud’s support allowed me to attempt to tackle infectious disease head-on in Sierra Leone; his wit and encouragement meant that no challenge appeared too big, and I hope to emulate his can-do attitude in a life of service.

  20. May Mahmoud Abdel Fattah

    My uncle whom I always cherished and loved unconditionally. He was always keen to know everything happening in Egypt, following up and making sure that we are doing good in spite of being busy and of the distance. He always advised me, listend to me and gave me his attention in all times. When he used to come to Egypt, that was the brightest and most cheerful days of my life. I wished I could have been more around and could have spent more time with him, but I know that Sally, Jay and his beloved friends and colleagues were surrounding him with love and care and now he is in a safe place. I won’t pass a day without praying for him. His love and place in my heart will always remain. God blessed him and put his love in all whom he knew as much as he was kind, generous, giving and affectionate.

  21. Sten Vermund

    It was my great pleasure to work with Adel in NAS review, NIH advisory, and ASTMH advocacy work. Good-natured, erudite, experienced, Adel was the voice in the room that all of us wanted to hear. Sally has been my close colleague in the HPTN and I want to send my love to her and to the family in this time of sorrow. We celebrate Adel’s life and recognize his commitment to disease control and orevention, especially on behalf of the billion global denizens who live in profound poverty.

  22. George Alleyne

    I met Adel about 20 years ago on one of the several committees or working-groups in which we participated and count him as a dear friend. Several will testify knowingly to the fact that he was a good scientist,a public health guru and made a huge contribution to global health. But I remember him best for his quickness of mind, his encyclopedic knowledge of vaccines, his capacity for sharp repartee and his irrepressible good humor. I valued tremendously his advice which was given always with a puckish smile as he would remind me that old chairs of Departments of Medicine must stick together. His was an innings very well played.

  23. Manzoor

    I salute to this such a great intellectual , researcher and benevolent human.The humanity will never let him away from her hearts. He is marvel of humanity and benevolence on all humans. May his soul be in rest and peace. I am deeply saddened by his demise because our wold still in need of Dr.Adel research and guidance in the field of life saving vaccine development. He was the real face of Muslims and manifestation of true teaching of the Holy Quran which emphasizes salvation of every human life.

  24. Dr. Safaa ELMeneza

    My deepest condolences to Dr. Adel Family ,students, I feel deeply sorry for the sad news about his death .I will always remember his support and guidance during my 8 months fellowship in Cleveland 1985.I am honored to have 2 of my best articles with him . His contribution to science will not be forgotten . He was one of real scientist and I learned a lot from him since first minute I saw him . GOD bless his soul .

  25. Rachel Rizal

    In memory of my dear mentor, Dr. Adel Mahmoud – my Princeton senior thesis adviser who was formidable in inspiring me to bring various disciplines together to bring positive change to the world.

    Superb, Jovial, Caring: Three words that come in mind when I think about Professor Mahmoud, although anyone who knew him knows these adjectives are merely understatements to how incredible of a person he was. Two weeks ago, Dr. Adel Mahmoud passed away.

    Throughout his lifetime, Dr. Mahmoud was the President of Merck Vaccines and developed four new vaccines; dean of Case Western Medical School; advocate for global health; and an above-and-beyond mentor. I can’t even imagine how many millions of lives his work has saved. The world is truly a much better place with him. Thank you, Dr. Mahmoud, for inspiring the next two generations of world changers.

  26. Michael ("Mickey") Kron

    I just learned of Adel’s passing today, and was overcome with sadness. Adel was a mentor to me also as I completed my fellowship in Geographic Medicine at Case Western, and as recently as a few years ago when he recommended me for a Senior Science Advisor position at the State Department. As others have said, the world will miss his intellect, wit and energy. To Sally and the children, Linda and I offer our sincerest and deepest sympathies.

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