How our brains keep track of where we are in the world (Journal of Neuroscience)

Libraries, supermarkets, classrooms...the world is full of places that look very similar, and yet our brains always seem to keep track of where we are. In a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, researchers at Princeton University and Ohio State University have uncovered one way in which the brain does this. Similar-looking places … Continue reading How our brains keep track of where we are in the world (Journal of Neuroscience)

Water filters made with copper could remove bacteria at lower cost (Journal of Applied Physics)

Porous ceramic water filters are often coated with colloidal silver, which prevents the growth of microbes trapped in the micro- and nano-scale pores of the filter. Other metals such as copper and zinc have also been shown to exhibit anti-microbial activity. Princeton University's Wole Soboyejo and colleagues used atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements to study … Continue reading Water filters made with copper could remove bacteria at lower cost (Journal of Applied Physics)

Twenty-first-century projections of North Atlantic tropical storms from CMIP5 models (Nature Climate Change)

Efforts to predict North Atlantic hurricane activity should focus on improving the ability of global climate models to capture the processes that control patterns of sea surface temperature change through better modeling of cloud physics, atmospheric convection, oceanic processes, the role of aerosols, and overall improvements in spatial resolution of the models, according to a … Continue reading Twenty-first-century projections of North Atlantic tropical storms from CMIP5 models (Nature Climate Change)

Novel drug candidates offer new route to controlling inflammation (J. Medicinal Chemistry)

An international team of researchers has designed and conducted initial tests on molecules that have the potential to treat diseases involving inflammation, such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, stroke and sepsis. The team started by creating a three-dimensional map of a protein structure called the C3a receptor, which sits on the surface of human cells and … Continue reading Novel drug candidates offer new route to controlling inflammation (J. Medicinal Chemistry)

Study sheds light on how facial expressions evolved (Journal of Neuroscience)

A new study led by Asif Ghaz­an­far's lab of Prince­ton Uni­ver­sity investigates the evolution of primate facial movements. They found that monkeys coordinate their facial muscles in different ways when communicating than when eating, and these distinct motor patterns implicate different neural mechanisms in the brainstem. These findings give insights into the evolutionary origins of … Continue reading Study sheds light on how facial expressions evolved (Journal of Neuroscience)