With climate change, heat more than natural disasters will drive people away (PNAS)

By Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications Although scenes of people fleeing from dramatic displays of Mother Nature's power dominate the news, gradual increases in an area's overall temperature — and to a lesser extent precipitation — actually lead more often to permanent population shifts, according to Princeton University research. The researchers examined 15 years of … Continue reading With climate change, heat more than natural disasters will drive people away (PNAS)

Migrating north may trigger immediate health declines among Mexicans (Demography)

By B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs Mexican immigrants who relocate to the United States often face barriers like poorly paying jobs, crowded housing and family separation. Such obstacles – including the migration process itself – may be detrimental to the health of Mexican immigrants, especially those who have recently … Continue reading Migrating north may trigger immediate health declines among Mexicans (Demography)

Death of an adult son increases depressive symptoms in mothers, but not fathers (Social Science and Medicine)

By B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs Mothers – but not fathers – exhibited symptoms of depression and experienced declines in overall health after the death of an adult son, while the death of a daughter had no such effect on either parent, according to one of the first studies … Continue reading Death of an adult son increases depressive symptoms in mothers, but not fathers (Social Science and Medicine)

More or less equal? How men factor into the reproductive equation (Gender & Society)

By Bess Connolly Martell, Office of Public Affairs and Communications, Yale University Researchers know a lot about how women's bodily health affects their fertility, but less is known about how men's health affects reproductive outcomes. Yale University researcher Rene Almeling and co-author Miranda Waggoner of Princeton University address this discrepancy in an article published Tuesday, … Continue reading More or less equal? How men factor into the reproductive equation (Gender & Society)

Small declines in agility, facial features may predict risk of dying (Epidemiology)

By B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs A new study from Princeton University shows that health assessments made by medically untrained interviewers may predict the mortality of individuals better than those made by physicians or the individuals themselves. Features like forehead wrinkles and lack of agility may reflect a person's … Continue reading Small declines in agility, facial features may predict risk of dying (Epidemiology)

Princeton researchers use mobile phones to measure happiness (Demography)

By Tara Thean, Science-Writing Intern, Office of the Dean for Research Researchers at Princeton University are developing ways to use mobile phones to explore how one's environment influences one's sense of well-being. In a study involving volunteers who agreed to provide information about their feelings and locations, the researchers found that cell phones can efficiently … Continue reading Princeton researchers use mobile phones to measure happiness (Demography)