Half a degree more global warming could flood out 5 million more people

Car in water

By Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications The 2015 Paris climate agreement sought to stabilize global temperatures by limiting warming to well below 2.0 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and to pursue limiting warming even further, to 1.5 C. To quantify what that would mean for people living in coastal areas, a group of researchers employed … Continue reading Half a degree more global warming could flood out 5 million more people

Researchers propose surveillance system for Zika virus and other infectious diseases (The Lancet)

By Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research A group of prominent researchers from seven institutions including Princeton University are calling for the establishment of a worldwide program to collect and test blood and other human bodily fluids to aid in the study and prevention of emerging infectious diseases such as the mosquito-borne Zika … Continue reading Researchers propose surveillance system for Zika virus and other infectious diseases (The Lancet)

Study questions the prescription for drug resistance (Proceedings of the Royal Society B)

By Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research In response to the rise of drug-resistant pathogens, doctors are routinely cautioned against overprescribing antimicrobials. But when a patient has a confirmed bacterial infection, the advice is to treat aggressively to quash the infection before the bacteria can develop resistance. A new study questions the accepted … Continue reading Study questions the prescription for drug resistance (Proceedings of the Royal Society B)

With climate change, heat more than natural disasters will drive people away (PNAS)

By Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications Although scenes of people fleeing from dramatic displays of Mother Nature's power dominate the news, gradual increases in an area's overall temperature — and to a lesser extent precipitation — actually lead more often to permanent population shifts, according to Princeton University research. The researchers examined 15 years of … Continue reading With climate change, heat more than natural disasters will drive people away (PNAS)

Migrating north may trigger immediate health declines among Mexicans (Demography)

By B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs Mexican immigrants who relocate to the United States often face barriers like poorly paying jobs, crowded housing and family separation. Such obstacles – including the migration process itself – may be detrimental to the health of Mexican immigrants, especially those who have recently … Continue reading Migrating north may trigger immediate health declines among Mexicans (Demography)

Model anticipates ecological impacts of human responses to climate (Conservation Biology)

By B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs Throughout history, humans have responded to climate. Take, for example, the Mayans, who, throughout the eighth and 10th centuries, were forced to move away from their major ceremonial centers after a series of multi-year droughts, bringing about agricultural expansion in Mesoamerica, and a … Continue reading Model anticipates ecological impacts of human responses to climate (Conservation Biology)

Death of an adult son increases depressive symptoms in mothers, but not fathers (Social Science and Medicine)

By B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs Mothers – but not fathers – exhibited symptoms of depression and experienced declines in overall health after the death of an adult son, while the death of a daughter had no such effect on either parent, according to one of the first studies … Continue reading Death of an adult son increases depressive symptoms in mothers, but not fathers (Social Science and Medicine)

More or less equal? How men factor into the reproductive equation (Gender & Society)

By Bess Connolly Martell, Office of Public Affairs and Communications, Yale University Researchers know a lot about how women's bodily health affects their fertility, but less is known about how men's health affects reproductive outcomes. Yale University researcher Rene Almeling and co-author Miranda Waggoner of Princeton University address this discrepancy in an article published Tuesday, … Continue reading More or less equal? How men factor into the reproductive equation (Gender & Society)

Princeton researchers use mobile phones to measure happiness (Demography)

By Tara Thean, Science-Writing Intern, Office of the Dean for Research Researchers at Princeton University are developing ways to use mobile phones to explore how one's environment influences one's sense of well-being. In a study involving volunteers who agreed to provide information about their feelings and locations, the researchers found that cell phones can efficiently … Continue reading Princeton researchers use mobile phones to measure happiness (Demography)

How will crops fare under climate change? Depends on how you ask (Global Change Biology)

By Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications The damage scientists expect climate change to do to crop yields can differ greatly depending on which type of model was used to make those projections, according to research based at Princeton University. The problem is that the most dire scenarios can loom large in the minds of the … Continue reading How will crops fare under climate change? Depends on how you ask (Global Change Biology)