Researchers propose surveillance system for Zika virus and other infectious diseases (The Lancet)

By Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research A group of prominent researchers from seven institutions including Princeton University are calling for the establishment of a worldwide program to collect and test blood and other human bodily fluids to aid in the study and prevention of emerging infectious diseases such as the mosquito-borne Zika … Continue reading Researchers propose surveillance system for Zika virus and other infectious diseases (The Lancet)

Study questions the prescription for drug resistance (Proceedings of the Royal Society B)

By Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research In response to the rise of drug-resistant pathogens, doctors are routinely cautioned against overprescribing antimicrobials. But when a patient has a confirmed bacterial infection, the advice is to treat aggressively to quash the infection before the bacteria can develop resistance. A new study questions the accepted … Continue reading Study questions the prescription for drug resistance (Proceedings of the Royal Society B)

Conservation versus innovation in the fight against antibiotic resistance (Science)

"Antibiotic resistance is a problem of managing an open-access resource, such as fisheries or oil," writes Ramanan Laxminarayan, a research scholar at Princeton University and the director of the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy in Washington, D. C., in today's issue of the journal Science. He goes on to say that individuals have … Continue reading Conservation versus innovation in the fight against antibiotic resistance (Science)

Unlocking the potential of bacterial gene clusters to discover new antibiotics (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.)

by Tien Nguyen, Department of Chemistry Resistance to antibiotics has been steadily rising and poses a serious threat to the stronghold of existing treatments. Now, a method from Mohammad Seyedsayamdost, an assistant professor of chemistry at Princeton University, may open the door to the discovery of a host of potential drug candidates. The vast majority … Continue reading Unlocking the potential of bacterial gene clusters to discover new antibiotics (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.)

More or less equal? How men factor into the reproductive equation (Gender & Society)

By Bess Connolly Martell, Office of Public Affairs and Communications, Yale University Researchers know a lot about how women's bodily health affects their fertility, but less is known about how men's health affects reproductive outcomes. Yale University researcher Rene Almeling and co-author Miranda Waggoner of Princeton University address this discrepancy in an article published Tuesday, … Continue reading More or less equal? How men factor into the reproductive equation (Gender & Society)

Contaminated water linked to low-weight babies, prematurity (Canadian Journal of Economics)

By B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs Pregnant women living in areas with contaminated drinking water may be more likely to have babies that are premature or have low birth weights (less than 5.5 pounds), according to a study based at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International … Continue reading Contaminated water linked to low-weight babies, prematurity (Canadian Journal of Economics)

Organizations shape pharmacists’ work as gatekeepers (Social Science and Medicine)

By Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications Pharmacists regularly face a range of ethical dilemmas, from deciding whether to dispense emergency contraception to managing requests for narcotics, and must navigate a range of relationships with other health-care professionals. Using 95 interviews with pharmacists working in retail and hospital settings, Princeton researcher Elizabeth Chiarello shows how organizations … Continue reading Organizations shape pharmacists’ work as gatekeepers (Social Science and Medicine)

The implications of “self-boosting” vaccines on herd immunity

Researchers use mathematical models to consider the implications of "self-boosting" vaccines—a class of emerging vaccines that can establish long-term intermittent antigen presentation within a host—on herd immunity. "Self-boosting vaccines and their implications for herd immunity" by Nimalan Arinaminpathy, et al. 10.1073/pnas.1209683109 Read the abstract