New Finding Aids for January and February 2015

Production photograph from the Princeton Triangle Club’s production of An Inconvenient Sleuth. Triangle Club Records (AC122).

Production photograph from the Princeton Triangle Club’s production of An Inconvenient Sleuth. Triangle Club Records (AC122).

The following finding aids for newly cataloged collections were added since the beginning of the year:

Archives of Form Magazine C1489

Form was an international magazine focused on concrete poetry and kinetic art. Three Cambridge-educated academics, Philip Steadman, Mike Weaver, and Stephen Bann, edited the magazine and produced ten issues from 1966 to 1969. The collection includes extensive correspondence between editors, subscribers, and contributors, along with editorial, financial, and administrative files spanning the entire existence of the magazine.

Antonio Pace Correspondence with Princetonians C1497

Consists primarily of incoming correspondence to Antonio Pace (1914-2004), a professor of Romance Languages at Syracuse University and the University of Washington, from Princeton faculty, particularly those in the fields of language and cultural studies, as well as from former Princeton classmates (*43). Other notable scholars are also represented. Some correspondents include: Gilbert Chinard (1881-1972), Claude Lévi-Strauss (1908-2009), Julian P. Boyd (1903-1980), Kenneth McKenzie (1870-1949), Theodore Fred Kuper (1886-1981), and Giuliano Bonfante (1904-2005).

Alexander von Enke Horoscopes C1500

Collection consists of three horoscopes, circa 1678, in German and some Latin, all prepared for Baron Alexander von Enke (1650-1687), who served in the army of the Electorate of Saxony and fought against the Ottoman Turks during the Great Turkish War (1683-1699). Astronomer, astrologer, and almanac-compiler Johann Henrich Voigt (1613-1691) prepared two of the volumes. The author of the third is unknown.

Charles Ruas Papers C1372

Charles Ruas is an American author, interviewer, editor, literary and art critic, and French translator, who served as the Director of the Drama and Literature Department for New York’s Pacifica radio station WBAI-FM in the late 1970s and interviewed writers for radio broadcast and print, including Toni Morrison, Michel Foucault, Carlos Fuentes, Eudora Welty, Susan Sontag, Truman Capote, Buckminster Fuller, Andy Warhol, Mario Vargas Llosa, and others. The papers include transcripts and audiocassette tapes of Ruas’s interviews with authors and artists, as well as typescripts and galleys of work by writers Ruas edited, including Marguerite Young, and some related photographs, notes, and correspondence.

De Christianissima Regina Galliae Maria Medicis In Gallias Properante manuscript, circa 1600 C0938 (No. 682)

Anonymous poem of Italian origin celebrating the marriage of King Henri IV of France (1553-1610) and Marie de’ Medici (1573-1642) in 1600.

French manuscript on childbirth, circa 1600 C0938 (No. 681)

Fols. 1r-3v: “Pour aider à accoucher la femme” offer practical advice on childbirth. Fols. 3v-4v include pharmaceutical recipes, in part derived from François Rousset (1535?-1590?) and Laurent Joubert (1529-1582), two of the leading French physicians of the 16th century.

Makoto Yasuda Papers on Private Investment Company for Asia MC274

Makoto Yasuda is the former chairman of Private Investment Company for Asia (PICA), an association of 243 North American, European, Japanese, Australian, and Canadian companies and banks. Based in Singapore, PICA funded new and existing private businesses throughout Asia, specifically in countries with tiger economies. The collection is comprised of PICA’s annual and quarterly reports, investment proposals and reports on investment projects, and Board of Directors and Executive Committee meeting minutes and correspondence.

Miscellany containing Latin works on rhetoric and philosophy, Béziers(?), France, 1636 C0938 (No. 680)

Possibly kept by a certain Millié, who was a professor at the Collège de Béziers, a Jesuit college in southern France, and/or by a student named Malbosius or Malbois at the same college. Contents include:  pp. 1-80: Artis rhetoricae epitome (The 2 pages after p. 49 are marked “translata obmissa” and Millié’ in a later hand) dated 1636 at the end and signed “Malbosius trans[or 17 ans?],” followed by an unpaginated leaf signed “Malbois” with a paraph and several ownership notes; pp. 1-20: Methodus sive ratio studendi. Contains a syllabus and reading list on the teaching of subjects in an academic course of philosophy, including rhetoric, logic, metaphysics, physics, mathematics, and medicine. (Signed at the end “Malbosius,” with his paraph, monogram ‘MALB’ and [undeciphered] ad: XV Calendes decembris anno christi 1636. “Joannes De Croy fecit”); pp. 21-29: Index auctorum, divisionum, et scientiarum, qua hoc in libro scripta sunt. Contains list of authors and titles of books mentioned in the Methodus, with recommended authors indicated. Index gives folio numbers, though the manuscript is paginated. Dated 1636 at the end and signed Malbosius” with his paraph.

Robert H. Barton Family Correspondence C1498

Consists primarily of incoming correspondence to Robert H. Barton (1811-1898) of Providence, Rhode Island, from his family that begins in the winter of 1849 when Barton left his wife and four children to head to the California gold fields. The 70 plus letters, which continue until the early 1870s, are from various family members and friends all with the common theme of “come home.” Also included are a few letters from Barton; some family photographs; and Barton’s account statement from Gregory & Waite Groceries & Provisions (Nevada City).

Sonya Rudikoff Papers C1493

Sonya Rudikoff (1927-1997) was a writer, literary critic, and independent scholar, active from the 1950s through the 1990s, who wrote primarily on Victorian literature, feminism, and Virginia Woolf. The papers include Rudikoff’s professional and personal correspondence, including five decades of extensive correspondence from second-generation Abstract Expressionist painter Helen Frankenthaler; typescripts of Rudikoff’s unpublished fiction and lectures; notebooks, papers, and diaries from her time at Bennington College in the late 1940s; along with a curriculum vitae and bibliography of her work and some related materials.

Todd S. Purdum Papers MC270

Todd S. Purdum (1959-) is a political journalist whose work has appeared in a number of publications, including Vanity Fair, The New York Times, and POLITICO. The collection mostly consists of Purdum’s research materials on various political and cultural figures created for his work with Vanity Fair. Other noteworthy materials in the collection relate to Purdum’s senior thesis written for Princeton University’s History Department on the Eisenhower-era State Department’s Loyalty-Security Program.


New additions to existing collections were added to the following finding aids:

Americans United for Separation of Church and State Records MC185

Series 5, the 2015 Accession, 1990-2013, is largely comprised of minutes, memorandums, correspondence, financial and departmental reports, legislative updates, and other materials related to the meetings of the Board of Trustees and the National Advisory Council (NAC). To a lesser extent, it includes the records of select committees, especially the bylaws committee.

Eugene M. Becker Papers MC125

Series 6, Ireland House Project, 2001-2013, contains unpublished notes and working documents related to the production of New Perspectives in Managing Ireland’s Economy for the Country to Thrive in the Turbulence of World Markets, Volumes I and II. Becker co-authored these volumes and Volume II’s insert adjustment, which were a project of the Glucksman Ireland House at New York University.

Historical Photograph Collection, Grounds and Buildings Series, Butler Apartments AC111

The Grounds and Buildings Series of the Historical Photograph Collection contains photographs of the grounds and buildings owned by Princeton University. The photographs date from the late 1850s to the present, with the bulk of the photographs dating from the 1870s to the 1940s.

Historical Subject Files, Radcliffe Heermance Letter to Bruce M. Wright Regarding Princeton and Race AC109

The Historical Subject Files Collection documents Princeton University history and related topics from 1746 to the present. The collection consists of documents in almost every two-dimensional format: articles, books and booklets, clippings, correspondence, memoranda, non-photographic images, notes, pamphlets, posters, and reports.

James A. Baker III Oral History Collection MC212

The James A. Baker III Oral History Project is a joint project run by the Seeley G. Mudd Library at Princeton University and the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University. The collection consists of transcripts and audio files of interviews with individuals who knew and worked closely with James A. Baker III during his career in politics and public service. New interviews or transcripts of previous interviews with Stewart Addison Baker, E. William Barnett, Addison Baker Duncan, Edward Watson Kelley Jr., Preston Moore Jr., Edward Randall III, Patricia Schutts, the Sims brothers, Walter Smith, G. Irvin Terrell, Francita Ulmer, Robert Weatherall, Wallace Wilson, and Jim Cicconi have recently been added to the collection.

Office of the Treasurer Records AC128

Series 8: Christopher McCrudden Files, 1973-2006, consists of the chronological files of Christopher McCrudden. The files were created over the course of 23 years as McCrudden served in a variety of capacities in the Office of the Treasurer (now the Office of Finance and Treasury), beginning with his role as assistant controller for budget and long-range planning, and culminating in his role as university treasurer and vice president for finance. The files are composed of correspondence and memoranda and they document a broad spectrum of topics related to university finances.

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Records AC332

Series 2: Publications consists of back issues of serials produced by the PPPL Communications Office. The serials include: PPPL Hotline, which is published irregularly and features stories about the Laboratory’s employees, projects, events, and activities; PPPL News, which is generally published monthly as a summary of recent events and activities;PPPL Weekly, which contains a weekly overview of laboratory highlights; Fact Sheets, produced periodically and written for the general public and broader scientific community; and This Week at PPPL, which is a digital display in the Lab’s lobby that previews the upcoming week’s events.

School of Engineering and Applied Science Records AC162

Series 10: Guggenheim Laboratory Time Capsule Materials, circa 1964, includes photographs of the lab building and personnel; a press release from the cornerstone laying ceremony; a list of Princeton University Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Sciences Guggenheim Laboratory theses and dissertations; a 1964 laboratories annual report; and related materials.

Triangle Club Records AC122

Subseries 8S: February 2015 Accession, Scores, Scripts, Set Photographs, and Videos documents shows that were produced between Fall 2013 and Fall 2014. The subseries contains a mix of original scripts, musical scores, still images, audio, and videos from the following productions: Zero Gravitas (2014 reunions version), Waiting for Guyot,Must Be ’18 or Older to Enter, and An Inconvenient Sleuth. It also includes video footage of the Triangle Disney Cabaret, a one-time special production held in December 2014, and blog posts narrating the Club’s 2015 tour.

10. March 2015 by Rare Books and Special Collections
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Versailles on Paper: A Graphic Panorama of the Palace and Gardens of Louis XIV

Robert Nanteuil. Louis XIV, 1666. Engraving. Graphic Arts Collection. Gift of John Douglas Gordon, Class of 1905.

Robert Nanteuil. Louis XIV, 1666. Engraving. Graphic Arts Collection. Gift of John Douglas Gordon, Class of 1905.


Opening Lecture: Dr. Ian Thompson,author of The Sun King’s Garden and Reader in Landscape Architecture at Newcastle University, at 3:00 p.m. on 14 February 2015 in 101 McCormick Hall, sponsored by the Department of French & Italian and the Friends of the Princeton University Library.

For the companion online exhibition, see :

This exhibition documents the contemporary representation of Versailles through a multifaceted array of prints, books, maps, medals, and manuscripts. It highlights in particular those elements that today survive only on paper: ephemeral festivals; short-lived creatures (courtiers, animals, flowers); fragile groves and fountains too costly to maintain; and once celebrated masterpieces of art and architecture that were irrevocably destroyed or altered. The ‘paper Versailles’ is quite different from the one that millions of tourists visit every year and affords many unusual and surprising glimpses into a largely lost world. All the books and prints on display were created in the 17th and 18th centuries. With only a few exceptions, they were selected from the holdings of Firestone and Marquand Libraries, acquired over the past 140 years. A large number of these items came as gifts; therefore, this exhibition also honors the curators, alumni, and friends of the Princeton University Library who have built its remarkable collections.

12. February 2015 by Rare Books and Special Collections
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Teaching the Untouchable: Rare Books Education in Elementary School Classrooms


“Hands-on with Vellum”

Rare books and elementary school classrooms…can the two mix? The answer is yes, absolutely. For seven years, Dana Sheridan, Education & Outreach Coordinator, has had tremendous success bringing collections education to New Jersey schools. To date, over 14,000 children have participated in Cotsen in the Classroom, a hands-on, staff-facilitated, collections education program that features items from the Cotsen Children’s Library.  For more about the program, including “five tips for your rare books program,” see the November 2014 issue of College and Research Library News: “Teaching the Untouchable.”

13. November 2014 by Rare Books and Special Collections
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Attention Students: Submit Your Essay to Win the 2014-2015 Elmer Adler Undergraduate Book Collecting Prize!

Are you an avid collector of books, manuscripts, or other materials found in libraries? If so, consider submitting an essay about your collection for a chance to win the Elmer Adler Undergraduate Book Collecting Prize!

Image: (c) Jane and Louise Wilson, Oddments Room II (Voyages of the Adventure and Beagle), 2008. C-print, Edition of 4. Courtesy 303 Gallery, New York

Image: (c) Jane and Louise Wilson, Oddments Room II (Voyages of the Adventure and Beagle), 2008. C-print, Edition of 4. Courtesy 303 Gallery, New York

Endowed from the estate of Elmer Adler, who for many years encouraged the collecting of books by Princeton undergraduates, this prize is awarded annually to an undergraduate student, or students, who, in the opinion of a committee of judges, have shown the most thought and ingenuity in assembling a thematically coherent collection of books, manuscripts, or other material normally collected by libraries. Please note that the rarity or monetary value of the student’s collection is not as important as the creativity and persistence shown in collecting and the fidelity of the collection to the goals described in a personal essay.

The personal essay is about a collection owned by the student. It should describe the thematic or artifactual nature of the collection and discuss with some specificity the unifying characteristics that have prompted the student to think of certain items as a collection. It should also convey a strong sense of the student’s motivations for collecting and what their particular collection means to them personally. The history of the collection, including collecting goals, acquisition methods, and milestones are of particular interest, as is a critical look at how the goals may have evolved over time and an outlook on the future development of the collection. Essays are judged in equal measures on the strength of the collection and the strength of the writing.

Winners will receive their prizes at the annual winter dinner of the Friends of the Princeton University Library, which they are expected to attend. The first-prize essay will be published in a forthcoming issue of the Princeton University Library Chronicle. In addition, the first-prize essay has the honor of representing Princeton University in the National Collegiate Book Collecting Contest organized by the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America. Please note that per the ABAA’s contest rules, the winning essay will be entered exactly as submitted to the Adler Prize contest, without possibility of revision.

Prize amounts:

First prize: $2000
Second prize: $1500
Third prize: $1000

The deadline for submission is Tuesday, December 2, 2014. Essays should be submitted via e-mail, in a Microsoft Word attachment, to Faith Charlton: They should be between 9-10 pages long, 12pt, double-spaced, with a 1-inch margin, and include a separate cover sheet with your name, class year, residential address, email address, and phone number. In addition to the essay, each entry should include a selected bibliography of no more than 3 pages detailing the items in the collection. Please note that essays submitted in file formats other than Microsoft Word, submitted without cover sheet, or submitted without a bibliography will not be forwarded to the judges. For inquiries, please contact Faith Charlton,

Recent Adler Prize Winning Essays:

Rory Fitzpatrick, ’16. “The Search for the Shape of the Universe, One Book at a Time.” (forthcoming)

Natasha Japanwala ’14. “Conversation Among the Ruins: Collecting Books By and About Sylvia Plath.” PULC 74:2 (winter)

Mary Thierry ’12. “Mirror, Mirror: American Daguerrean Portraits.” PULC 73:3 (spring)

Chloe Ferguson ’13. “The Farther Shore: Collection, Memory, and the East Asian Literary Tradition.” PULC 73:3 (spring)

Lindsey Breuer ’11. “If Only I Could Apparate, My Harry Potter Collection Would Truly Appreciate.” PULC 73:3 (spring)

04. November 2014 by Rare Books and Special Collections
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“Nova Caesarea: A Cartographic Record of the Garden State, 1666-1888” Celebrates New Jersey’s 350th


Nova Caesarea: A Cartographic Record of the Garden State, 1666-1888” opens in the Main Gallery of Firestone Library, Princeton University, on Saturday, August 16. Commemorating the 350th anniversary (1664-2014) of the naming of New Jersey, this exhibition introduces viewers to the maps that charted the state’s development from unexplored colonial territory to the first scientifically surveyed state in the Union. Coastal charts, manuscript road maps, and early state maps provide a historical background to the major focus of the exhibition: the state’s first wall maps and county atlases. The large scale of these maps allowed mapmakers to include the names and locations of nineteenth-century farmers and merchants, hence personalizing local history.

Five landmark maps of New Jersey will appear together for the first time: Dutchman Pieter Goos’s 1666 nautical chart, the earliest printed map/chart of the territory that became New Jersey; Englishman William Faden’s 1777 map of “The Province of New Jersey, Divided into East and West, Commonly Called the Jerseys,” the most popular early map of the future state, which settled the boundary between New Jersey and New York; New Jersey cartographer William Watson’s 1812 map (one of three known institutional  copies), the first wall map of the state and the first to show all of its townships; Trenton surveyor Thomas Gordon’s 1828 wall map, the first large detailed and “official” state map; and the mammoth 1860 wall map of state geologist William Kitchell, compiled by Griffith Morgan Hopkins Jr., the largest map of New Jersey published in the nineteenth century, which attempted to show all the roads in the state.

Included in the exhibition are the first wall maps and atlases of a number of New Jersey counties, as well as two other cartographic rarities: the first wall map (1847) of the city of Newark (one of three known institutional copies) and Thomas Gordon’s “Map of Bergen Meadows” (1836), the first map of New Jersey’s Meadowlands (one of two known institutional copies). Accompanying many of the maps and atlases, for the purpose of historical comparison, are recent photographs of buildings and landscapes illustrated in them.

Early surveying guides and instruments provide an introduction to the methodology that led to the 1888 Atlas of New Jersey, the first published topographical survey of a U.S. state. Of particular interest is a mid-nineteenth-century surveyor’s wheel, or waywiser, which resembles a wheelbarrow. Using this tool, a surveyor could walk a route over a dirt road or field and easily measure the distance traveled. The revolutions of the large wheel turn dials in the wooden box that provide readings in feet, rods, furlongs, and miles. The circumference of the wheel is 8.25 feet; hence, two revolutions equal one rod (16.5 feet), forty rods make a furlong, and eight furlongs add up to one mile.

A substantial, heavily illustrated, and beautifully designed volume accompanies the exhibition and expands upon its cartographic subject (380 pp., full color, 11” x 14”). It is available in two editions. Copies of the regular pictorial hardcover edition ($100) include a large pocket map. The 350 copies of the special edition ($250), also containing the pocket map, have been signed and numbered by the author and designer; clothbound, each volume is housed in a custom slipcase with a separate folder of enlarged copies of the first wall maps of all New Jersey counties. Both editions can be purchased in the Special Collections office (end of gallery) during business hours; order forms are available in the gallery.

“Nova Caesarea” will run through January 25, 2015. Hours are Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.; closed holidays. Exhibition tours with curator John Delaney will be offered at 3 p.m. on August 24, October 26, and December 14. The exhibition and its associated events are free and open to the public.

The “official” opening will take place on Sunday, October 5, with an illustrated talk by Dr. Maxine Lurie, professor emeritus, Seton Hall University, at 3 pm. in 101 McCormick Hall. And a substantial website is under development. Information on both of those developments will be forthcoming.

For other information, contact John Delaney, Curator of Historic Maps, 609-258-6156 (

15. August 2014 by Rare Books and Special Collections
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