What the ’L : an Historiated Initial from the 1540s-1550s

Latent.leaf.Harvey's.Livy
This historiated initial ‘L’ appears at the beginning of the edition of Livy’s Decades published by Johann Herwagen in Basel in September 1555. While depictions of playful putti were an established convention of historiated initials, what are we to make of this pair? Well, it turns out that they have been noticed before, appearing for the first time in the 1543 Basel edition of the Fabrica of Vesalius. They dwell there not in isolation but as part of a twenty-three letter suite depicting putti behaving like medical students — vivisecting a pig, snatching corpses for anatomical study, etc. The website of Karger Publishers advertising their newly published English translation of the Fabrica provides detailed illustrations of the suite: http://www.vesaliusfabrica.com/en/original-fabrica/the-art-of-the-fabrica/historiated-capitals.html. Moreover, Karger lists several studies, including one by Dr. Samuel W. Lambert (1859-1942) available in Hathi Trust. A relevant excerpt follows:

Three Vesalian essays to accompany the Icones anatomicae of 1934 / by the late Samuel W. Lambert, Willy Wiegand & William M. Ivins, Jr

Samuel W. Lambert, ‘The initial letters of the anatomical treatise, De Humani Corporis Fabrica, of Vesalius’, in T. A. Malloch (ed.), Three Vesalian Essays to accompany the Icones Anatomicae of 1934 (New York: Macmillan, 1952), pp. 1-24).

Hercules and the Nemean Lion • Lyons, 1490

1490.Paris.Hercules.A1

Woodcut on leaf A1 of Raoul Lefèvre Le Recueil des histoires de Troyes (Lyons: Michel Topié and Jacques Heremberck, 10 Oct. 1490). Goff L-114. [Call number (ExI) Item 6921096]. One of nearly 100 woodcuts, some full page in size, many half page. This new acquisition has several 16th / 17th signatures passim, all of the surname ‘de Saumery.’
❧ Killing the Nemean lion was the first labor of Hercules. He holds the lion’s skin which was said to be impervious to weapons. Looking on are his host, the shepherd Molorcus who lived near Cleonae as well as the companion of Hercules, Philotes. Lefevre’s Hercules is a “a medieval knight through and through” (The Classical Tradition [Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2010], p. 426.) William Caxton’s first major publication was his translation into English of Lefèvre’s Recueil.

Readers respond to a war of 18th century editions: the case of Anti-Machiavel

 Call number: (Ex) 7510.606.36.12


Frederick II, King of Prussia, 1712-1786. Essai de critique sur le prince de Machiavel. A Londres, 1751. French translation of Machiavelli’s Il principe by Amelot de La Houssaye and Essai in parallel columns together with ms. annotations in ink headed ‘Différences entre cette édition a cette faite chez a Van Duren que l’on tient être l’originale.’ Call number: (Ex) 7510.606.36.12

The publishing history of Anti-Machiavel is admirably told by Kees van Strien in his Voltaire in Holland 1736-1745 (Louvain: Editions Peters, 2011) p. 103-134, 391-440. Attributed to Frederick II (1712-1786), this refutation of Machiavelli’s The Prince was praised by the enlightened and disparaged by Roman Catholics, strict monarchists, and other conservatives. The Dutch publisher Jean van Duten (1687-1757) published the text in full on October 4, 1740 to the dismay of Voltaire, who had delivered the manuscript to him. Evidently, Voltaire thought some passages should be softened so as not to offend powerful individuals not in sympathy with Frederick’s tenets on government and religion. Voltaire immediately countered with a revised edition. Partnering with the publisher Pierre Paupie, he issued it about 15-17 October, 1740 with the imprint “A la Haye, aux depens de l’Editeur. M. DCC. XL.’ It claimed to correct the errors of the earlier edition.

In this competition of editions, readers wanted both texts together in one book such as this exemplar combining print and manuscript in hybrid (van Strien, p. 127.) In the exemplar illustrated above, the printed text consists of the sheets of the ‘l’Editeur’ [Voltaire] / Paupie edition (1740). Added in manuscript are the bits of original text expunged or otherwise modified. (Who made these transcriptions in ink is not known.) Also preceding the text is a printed title page with imprint ‘Londres. 1751.’ (No such edition appears in ESTC.) In these edition wars, ‘Londres’ was a code for the original unaltered text because one of the opening salvos was Van Duten’s production of the full original text with the imprint of London publisher William Mayer / Meyer (ESTC T191141 and T91110.) (As to ‘1751’, it’s difficult to answer why this year appears, rather than an earlier year during the 1740s when the edition war was active.)

Hybrid copies such as the Princeton exemplar were edged from the market by the publication in 1741 of editions replicating the manuscript annotations of a hybrid in the printed text. Voltaire was the force behind these editions, which appeared under the false imprints of ‘les Frères Columb’ (Marseille) and ‘Jaques La Caze’ (Amsterdam).

15th century bookmark with column indicator

Sermones aurei de Sanctis Fratris Leonardi de Vtino

Sermones aurei de Sanctis Fratris Leonardi de Utino Venice: Franciscus Renner, de Heilbronn, with Nicolaus de Frankfordia, 1473. (Goff L-152) Call number: ExI 5428.579

Although this incunable was rebound in 1945, a remnant of the original 15th century binding was laid in — a bookmark with a rotating column-indicator. ❧ Other examples are known, such as:
• Harvard University, Houghton MS Typ 277, 12th c. [link to image] Register bookmark with adjustable dial set between column II and III (i.e. col. B verso and col. A recto [not pictured]) [See the recent posting discussing this Houghton example in the blog medievalfragments (Institute for Cultural Disciplines, Universiteit Leiden)].
Medieval Rotating Column-Indicators: An Unrecorded Second Example in a Thirteenth Century Bible (Cambridge, Corpus Christi College Ms 49) by Richard Emms published in Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, Vol. 12, No. 2 (2001), pp. 179-184 [Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41154907]

A Binding by Thomas Krüger 1580

Signed and dated: T.K. 1563. British Museum. Dept. of Prints and Drawings. No. 1867,0713.115

Full length portrait of Philip Melanchton. ‘Modern impression’ print acquired by the British Museum in 1867, of panel signed and dated: T.K. 1563., viz., Thomas Krüger, Wittenberg bookbinder.
British Museum. Dept. of Prints and Drawings. No. 1867,0713.115

Front cover of  Ex 5646.604.

Full length portrait of Philip Melanchton. Panel signed and dated: T.K. 1563., viz., Thomas Krüger, Wittenberg bookbinder. Panel stamped in gilt on front cover of blind-tooled pigskin binding of the first Latin edition of the Lutheran Konkordienbuch (Leipzig, 1580). Call number: Ex 5646.604.

From a description of an instance of the use of this panel on a binding at the British Library:

“Thomas Krüger, possibly the son of the binder Nikolaus Krüger of Wittenberg and himself a binder, started work not later than 1560. A number of his panels were signed, either with his full name or with his initials, and some were dated. … The large Melanchthon panel on this binding, dated 1563 and with Cranach’s device at the bottom, … [Ed.: note Cranach's device: Cranach's.device.from.Weale1]… was copied from a woodcut by Cranach dated 1561,showing Melanchthon wearing the same fur-trimmed robe, neckcloth and shoes as on the panel, but with a closed instead of an open book in his right hand and a cap in his left. The face and hair are remarkably alike. The same woodcut served as example for the panels of other Wittenberg binders, such as those signed by Severin Rötter and Nikolaus Müller.” (- Mirjam M. Foot, “A Binding by Thomas Kruger, 1573. ” The Book Collector Vol 30, no. 2 (Summer 1981) p. 232-3. For image see the British Library Database of Bookbindings [link])

The back cover of this Leipzig, 1580 Latin edition of the Lutheran Konkordienbuch (Book of Concord) is stamped in gold with a full length portrait of Martin Luther, a panel also made by Thomas Krüger. Surrounding both panels is a blind decorative roll composed of four portrait heads and three coats of arms. The roll is signed ‘H.B.,’viz., Heinrich Blume, also of Wittenberg. Further details and bibliography about these two panels and one decorative roll are available in the Einbanddatenbanken (EBDB). For Luther, see Zitiernummer EBDB p002949; for Melanchthon, Zitiernummer EBDB p002950 and for roll signed ‘H B’ with four heads and three coats of arms, see Zitiernummer EBDB r000351

❧ Larger images

Signed and dated: T.K. 1563. British Museum. Dept. of Prints and Drawings. No. 1867,0713.115

Full length portrait of Philip Melanchton. ‘Modern impression’ print acquired by the British Museum in 1867, of panel signed and dated: T.K. 1563., viz., Thomas Krüger, Wittenberg bookbinder.
British Museum. Dept. of Prints and Drawings. No. 1867,0713.115

Front cover of  Ex 5646.604.

Full length portrait of Philip Melanchton. Panel signed and dated: T.K. 1563., viz., Thomas Krüger, Wittenberg bookbinder. Panel stamped in gilt on front cover of blind-tooled pigskin binding of the first Latin edition of the Lutheran Konkordienbuch (Leipzig, 1580). Call number: Ex 5646.604.

Full length portrait of Martin Luther. Panel signed T.K., that is,  Thomas Krüger, Wittenberg bookbinder. Panel stamped in gilt on back cover of blind-tooled pigskin binding of the first Latin edition of the Lutheran Konkordienbuch (Leipzig, 1580). Call number: Ex 5646.604

Full length portrait of Martin Luther. Panel signed T.K., viz., Thomas Krüger, Wittenberg bookbinder. Panel stamped in gilt on back cover of blind-tooled pigskin binding of the first Latin edition of the Lutheran Konkordienbuch (Leipzig, 1580). Call number: Ex 5646.604

Dr. Benjamin Franklin’s Advice to Bathers (1819)

Frontispiece to The Art of Swimming(London: John Bailey, 1819). Call number: Ex 4244.361

Frontispiece to The Art of Swimming (London: John Bailey, [1819]). Call number: Ex 4244.361. ❧ Captions of vignettes: To Swim Backwards; To Carry the Left Leg in the Right Hand; On the Manner of Diving; To Float with the Face Towards the Sky; To Cut the Nails of Your Toes in the Water.

Call number Ex 4244 361

Titlepage of The Art of Swimming … and Advice to Bathers, by the Late Celebrated Dr. Benj. Franklin (London: John Bailey, [1819]) Call number: Ex 4244 361.

The “Cautions To Learners, and Advice to Bathers, by the Late Celebrated Dr. Benj. Franklin” are “a pastiche of pieces of two of the good Doctor’s letters, one to Oliver Neave written some time before 1769 and the other to Jacques Barbeu-Dubourg of March 1773”

These letters were available in published form during the 18th century: that to Neave, published in Franklin’s Experiments and Observations on Electricity. (4th edition, London, 1769), pp. 463-8; and that to Barbeu-Dubourg appeared in an English translation published in the Works of the late Doctor Benjamin Franklin (London, 1793, 1794, 1796, 1799; Dublin, 1793, Dundee, 1796, 1800) (per Edwin Wolf 2nd, Annual Report of the Library Company of Philadelphia for the Year 1980, p.47).

This pastische was first published as such in London by Ann Lemoine in 1798 (ESTC N64777, T216540, and N50903) and was reprinted many times thereafter.

The Princeton copy illustrated here is one such reprint. The date ‘1819’ was assigned by a bibliographer of the literature of swimming, Ralph Thomas, in his Swimming; With Lists of Books Published in English, German, French and Other European Languages [1904], p. 224.

Thomas also notes that this reprint has the ‘objectional interpolation’ – a moniker for nonsense advice thus explained by Thomas: “Unfortunately about 1812 some ignoramus in one of the catchpenny reprints after ‘Then plunge under it with your eyes open’ added ‘which must be kept open before going under, as you cannot open the eyelids for the weight of water above you.’ This nonsense, which at once stamps the writer, and all those who quote it, as ignorant of diving, because it is perfectly easy to open the eyes under water, has been copied from one publication to another, right down to the present day [1904]: nobody ever thinking of verifying the passage, but some of the later writers have refuted the idea.” (p. 188)

Full text of this Princeton copy is available at Hathi Trust.
See http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=njp.32101050403599

A Rhapsody of early British Ephemera: 361 General items and 416 Book Trade : Recently acquired and digitized

Museum.ticket.admission

For details about Boulter’s Museum see “Notes on an Eighteenth Century Museum at Great Yarmouth “Museum Boulterianum” and on the Development on the Modern Museum” by Thomas Southwell in The Museums Journal, October 1908, p. 110 ff [link] Call number: (Ex) 2014-0001M Box 1, item 98.

General.ephemera.sample1

Ephemera published in England, Scotland, and Ireland between ca. 1650 and 1850 : The general collection has 361 printed pieces of ephemera relating to commercial trade, institutional, entertainment, museums, medicine, etc. Not only has the Princeton University Library recently acquired these originals, it also provides:
Electronic access: Inventory list with thumbnails and links to full size images: PDF, 53 pages [link]
Description: 1.1 linear ft. (2 boxes)
Descriptive terms:
• Advertisements, trade labels, and commercial announcements for those enterprising in: Alcoholic beverages, Auctions, Banks and banking, Barbers, Boats and boating, Cabinetwork, Clock and watch makers, Clothing trade, Coaching (Transportation), Concerts, Dentistry, Exhibitions, Groceries, Harness making and trade, Horses, Hotels, taverns, etc, Hotels, Ink, Insurance companies, Iron, Jewelers, Laundries, Lotteries, Millinery, Museums, Paint, Perfumes, Real estate agents, Restaurants, Saddlery, Sewing –Equipment and supplies, Shoe industry, Shoes, Taverns (Inns), and Tea.
• Forms and genres of ephemera such as Blank forms, Clippings, Invitations, Maxims, Military orders, Programs, Receipts (financial records), Satire, and Tickets.
> Call number: (Ex) 2014-0001M

BookTrade.sample1

Ephemera from the book trade as well as some library labels and bookplates, chiefly British, 18th and 19th centuries. The book trade collection includes 416 printed pieces of ephemera relating to every aspect of the Book Trade — Booksellers advertisements, Bookbinder’s advertisements, Paper makers, Printers, Stationers, Lithographers, Circulating Library labels and advertisements. Also included are some other library labels and bookplates of individuals. Not only has the Princeton University Library recently acquired these originals, it also provides:
Electronic access: Inventory list with thumbnails and links to full size images: PDF, 36 pages [link]
Description: .9 linear ft. (2 boxes)
Descriptive terms:
• Advertisements: printing, publishing, bookselling, stationery trade, bookbinding, commerical libraries. Library labels, rules and regulations. Bookplates.
• Forms and genres of ephemera such as trade labels, binder’s tickets, bookseller’s tickets, booklabels.
> Call number: (Ex) 2014-0002M

Abraham Ortelius presents a book

KanePtolemy1584.inscription.Copy

Inscribed at foot of titlepage: Pietate & humanitate venerabli D[omi]no, D[omino] Francisco Superantio Abraham Ortelius dono mittebat. [Abraham Ortelius has sent forth this gift to Lord Francesco Soranzo, venerable master in devotion and in cultured learning.]

❧ Francesco Soranzo (1557-1607) was a Venetian noble who served as ambassador to Spain from 1598 to 1600. • In 1597 in a letter to his nephew, Ortelius described his friend Soranzo: “At Venice, I doubt if I have, among the many friends there, any greater than Francisus Superantius (his venancular name is ‘de la Soranzo’), for I have felt myself to have had his benefits very often.” [Hessels, Epistulae Ortelianae (1887), 303: Venetiis magnum inter ceteros amicum Franciscum Superantium (vulgo de la Soranzo) habeam subdubito, at habuisse me saepius sensi suis beneficiis.] • Not only had Soranzo provided hospitality in Venice to Ortelius, he more notably provided him with books coming from the Venetian publishers. [See Hessels, Epistulae Ortelianae (1887), 85 and 141]. In return Ortelius sent him books. Books marked their friendship and the regularity of exchange was clearly noted. In the same 1597 letter to his nephew, Ortelius remarked further that it had been a while since he had received books from Soranzo and he just didn’t know why – perhaps ‘lost in transit’ he speculated. • This book clearly survived the trip between northern Europe and Italy as well as much between, eventually and arriving in Princeton in the late 1940s as part of the Grenville Kane Collection.
❧ Ptolemy. Geographiae libri octo. Cologne: Gottfried von Kempen, 1584. The first edition of Ptolemy’s Geography with maps by Mercator. Call number: EXKA Ptolemy 1584. Cf. Wilberforce Eames, A List of Editions of Ptolemy’s Geography 1475-1730, (New York, 1886), p. 25-26.
❧ For more on Soranzo see Barozzi, Nicolò, ed. Relazioni degli stati Europei lette al Senato dagli ambasciatori Veneti nel secolo decimosettimo (Venice, 1856) ser.1, v.1, p. 27 ff.
KanePtolemy1584.Copy

Accessioned 101 years ago

TS.Rutherford.chap.1

Purchased by Thomas Shepard (1635-1677), clergyman of Charlestown, Massachusetts, on February 24, 1660 • Accessioned by the Princeton University Library on March 26, 1913. • Digitized by Google on September 19, 2008 • Available now on Google Books [link] as well as Hathi Trust [link].

Rutherford, Samuel, 1600?-1661. A Free Disputation Against Pretended Liberty of Conscience: Tending to Resolve Doubts Moved by Mr. John Goodwin, John Baptist, Dr. Jer Dr. Taylor, the Belgick Arminians, Socinians, And Other Authors … London: Printed by R. I. For Andrew Crook, 1649. Inscribed on p. 1: ‘Thomas Shepard: pret: 12 solid: 24.2°.60.’ For more on books owned and annotated by Thomas Shepard (1635-1677), see companion blog ‘Rare Book Collections @ Princeton’ [link1], [link2], [link3].

Gallery of sigla and other notations used by Shepard at
http://theartofgooglebooks.tumblr.com/post/37719388972/copious-marginalia-with-corrections-commentary

Aristotle on all fronts: Four 18th century editions bound in one volume covering child birth, magic, palmistery, jokes, sex, astronomy, astrology, physiognomy, “monstrous” children and slang words.

15891
Bound in first:. Aristotle’s Compleat Master-piece. In three parts dispaying the secrets of Nature in the Generation of Man [...] to which is added a treasure of Health; or the Family Physician. Twenty-First Edition. [London]: printed and sold by the Booksellers, 1738. (ESTC N298970, noting ‘Not in fact by Aristotle; the attribution is spurious.’)

15891_1

Followed by: Aristotle’s Compleat and Experienc’d Midwife. In two parts. I. A guide for child-bearing women in the time of their conception, bearing and suckling their children [...] II. Proper and safe remedies for the curing of all those distempers that are incident to the Female Sex [...] Made English by W—S—, M.D. The Seventh Edition. London: printed and sold by the Booksellers, [1740?] (ESTC N51114 noting ‘Not in fact by Aristotle; the attribution is spurious.’)

15891_2

Followed by: Aristotle’s Book of Problems. with other Astronomers, Astrologers, Physicians and Philosophers. Wherein is contain’d divers, Questions and Answers touching the state of Man’s body [...]. Twenty-Fifth Edition. London: printed and sold by J.W, J.K, G.C., D.M, A.B, E.M, R.R, J.O. and L, B.M. and A.W, [1710?]. (ESTC N43372 noting ‘Not in fact by Aristotle; the attribution is spurious.’)
15891_3

And lastly comes: Aristotle’s Last Legacy: or, his Golden Cabinet of Secrets opened for youth’s delightful pastime. I. A compleat English Fortune-Teller. II. The whole art of Palmestry. III. A treatise of Moles. IV. The interpretation of Dreams. V. Observations on the Fortunate and Unfortunate Days. VI. A compleat books of Riddles. VIII. The city and country Jester; being a collection of new and witty Jests, Puns and Bulls. To which is added the Most Compleat Canting Dictionary. Translated into English by Dr. Saman, student in Astrology. Second Edition with the “Canting Dictionary.” London: printed for A. Bettsworth and C. Hitch [...], J. Osborn [...], S Birt [...], J. Hughes [...]. [1720?] (Not in ESTC)
15891_4

15891_5     
All these may be found bound together
    at call number (Ex) Item 6748731

Nicholson’s Circulating Library

Nicholson.Booklabel

Booklabel of Nicholson’s Circulating Library on front paste-down of Joseph Harris, The Description and use of the Globes and Orrery. … The Sixth Edition. London: Printed for Thomas Wright, mathematical instrument-maker, at the Orrery near Water-Lane, and E. Chushee, globe-maker, at the Globe and Sun, between St. Dunstan’s Church and Chancery Lane, both in Fleet-Street. 1745.

Instructions.for.spine.label.on.front.free.endpaper

Instructions on front endpaper for titling the spine-label.

❧ “The principal Circulating Library in Cambridge, is Nicholson’s in Trumpington street. This Literary Repository has been established above fifty years, and may now be considered as one of the first in the kingdom: it is upon a different plan from any other extant ; consisting principally of classical and mathematical books, adapted to the lectures and studies of the University. The immense number of volumes, contained in this Library, is astonishing; for it possess three, four, and even five hundred copies of many publications, some of which are extremely scarce and of great value. The University and town are also accommodated here, with books of amusement and universal instruction: viz. Divinity, Law, Physic, History, Biography, Voyages, Travels, Novels, Romances, ‘Poetry, Plays, &c. &c, &c. in all languages: affording a Library adapted either for the study of the learned, or the instruction and amusement of the public in general. The terms of this Library are: subscriptions 7s. 6d. per quarter; for which sum each subscriber is allowed Fifteen Books at once, to be changed as often as agreeable. Books are also let out, on very moderate terms, by the volume or set, for any length of time. This Circulating Library has received the greatest encouragement from the members of the University, who in general become subscribers on their arrival at college. The number of subscribers in the University, (independent of the town and county) during term, generally exceeds five hundred.” — New Cambridge Guide; Or, A Description of the University, Town, and County of Cambridge (Cambridge: Printed for and sold by J. Nicholson, Trumpington-Street and F. and C. Rivington, St. Paul’s Church-yard, London. 1804) p. 97.

[For the portrait of bookseller and circulating library proprietor John Nicholson (1730–1796), see http://goo.gl/VTQe52 and for particulars about his nickname "Maps" see http://goo.gl/g8qt6H]

New.and.correct.globes

Inserted before page 35: Trade advertisement for Thomas Wright and Richard Cushee (d. 1732). Publisher of this 1745 edition, E. Cushee, succeeded Richard Cushee.

Rare Book Division. Call number: (Ex) Item 6813092

“New Pictures … from off Wooden Prints … With Verses applicable to each Print” • ca. 1750

DSCN0005.cropped
Happy marriage. (London : Printed and sold by R. Marshall … , ca. 1750). Call number: (EX) Item 6699052q

DSCN0002.cropped
Description of a Bad Wife. ([London: R. Marshall, ca. 1750]). Call number: (EX) Item 6699048q
• Note at lower right corner, the publisher’s series number ‘[No.I …’

❧ Richard Marshall was a printer, bookseller, publisher of chapbooks and prints, as well as a seller of maps, charts, and prints, who traded at number 4 Aldermary Churchyard, Bow Lane, London, from ca. 1753 to ca. 1785. He published on his own as well as with partner Cluer Dicey. It is from their joint catalogue published in 1764 that we get a glimpse of the publishing context for these two unrecorded prints. The catalogue [digitized copy] offers for sale more than 1000 separate prints arranged by type (copperplate, on the one hand, “wooden (i.e. woodcut) prints,” on the other) and size of paper (Royal, Foolscap, Pott). In addition, to Copper Royals, Foolscap Sheets, Pott Sheets, Perspective Views, and Wood Royals, Dicey and Marshall offered maps, copy-books, drawing-books, histories, old ballads, patters (i.e. verse), collections, Christmas carols, small histories, and small books. • Evidence from both these prints and the catalogue show that the prints were issued in numbered series. In the 1764 catalogue, as number 71 in the ‘Fools-cap Sheets’ series, Dicey and Marshall offer ‘The Happy and Unhappy Marriage.’ Although printed on paper larger than foolscap, the Library’s ‘Happy Marriage’ is perhaps a precursor to the 1764 print. Matching foolscap in size is ‘Description of a Bad Wife.’ • Popular ballads of the day warned of bad wives and extolled those “loving, careful [and] prudent.”

Note: For larger image size, right click image and select “Open image / link in new window / tab.”

Observing an engraver’s workshop in 1623

Kilian.detail.lower
❧ Wolfgang Kilian, citizen and engraver of Augsburg.

Kilian.detail.upper
❧ “Hard labor conquers difficulty” — Operating the rolling press requires two hands and a foot!

Kilian.detail

❧ Whereas others in the book trade choose emblematic figures or allegorical symbols for their devices, Wolfgang Kilian (1581-1662) gives us a detailed look into his shop. Depictions of his hard work now are his bona fides, while others prefer allusions to the past.

The full device is on the colophon page of Serenissimorum Austriae Ducum, Archiducum, Regum, Imperatorum Genealogia, à Rudolpho I. Habsburgensi, Caesare, ad Ferdinandum II. Rom. Imp. semper Augustum, &c. Aeri incisa a Wolfgango Kiliano, Eiconographo Augustano. (Augsburg: Wolfgang Kilian, 1623). Call number: (Ex) CS807.F4 M3 1580q

Bookplate of Margaretta Elizabeth, Baroness Arden (1768-1851)

Baroness.Arden.bookplate

Bookplate in the Princeton copy of Gianvincenzo Gravina (1664-1718). Della ragion poetica tra’ Greci, Latini ed Italiani. Edited by Thomas James Mathias. (London: T. Becket, 1806) [Call number: (Ex) 2950.406]
❧ This bookplate is not recorded in such standard sources as Franks Bequest: Catalogue of British and American Book Plates bequested to the Trustees of the British Museum (London, 1903). By good fortune, there is tipped in at front an 1806 letter by the book’s editor Thomas James Mathias (1754?- 1835). The letter provides a substantial clue about the name of the bookplate’s owner — Mathias addressees “you and Lord Arden.” The coronet in the bookplate is that of a baron, signaling that “Lord Arden” must be the “Baron Arden” of the day, Charles George Perceval, 2nd Baron Arden (1756–1840). His wife is Margaretta Elizabeth, Baroness Arden, and we can directly see her initials (“M.E.A.,” including those initials reversed) in the monogram below the coronet.

Mathias.recto

Mathias.verso

A Victorian collector makes an incunable

PTT.2864.1476.adnotatio
Adnotatio on back pastedown.
PTT.2864.1476.cover
Binding with the monogram of John Eliot Hodgkin
PTT.2864.1476.leaf.118.recto
[On right] Facsimile leaf made ca. 1860 by John Harris [leaf 118]

❧ The present physical make-up of this 1476 Milan edition of Horace resulted from the fabricating instructions of engineer and book collector John Eliot Hodgkin (1829-1912) of Richmond, Surrey.

To understand this book physically we must reverse-engineer it. Doing so we discover the chronological sequence of its production:

1. About 1860, John Eliot Hodgkin came into possession of an imperfect copy of the 1476 Horace and about that time, he states, he obtained from John Harris a facsimile of leaf 118. [For more on John Harris, see "John Harris the Pen-and-Ink Facsimilist"
by Toshiyuki Takamiya, Keio University (Link)]
2. The assemblage went into the hands of a binder who added margins to damaged leaves thus bringing all leaves to a uniform size of 25.6 cm tall x 15.7 cm wide. The leaves were washed and bleached leaving ghosts of annotations throughout. On the last leaf, faintly appears the name ‘Zanner Amerigoti.’
3. The text block was sewn onto five cords laced into boards covered in brown calf tooled in gilt with the recessed monogram “I E H”. All edges gilt.
4. On the back pastedown, Hodgkin mounted his ‘Adnotatio,’ in effect a memorial tablet detailing the recording of this edition by authoritative bibliographers and cognoscenti collectors.
5. In 1902, JEH published his descriptive notes about this copy in his Rariora.
[Link]

Rariora.1476.page-titlepage.uc2.ark--13960-t8z89hs5s-168

The book was sold at Sotheby (London) at Hodgkin’s sale in May 1914. In November 1914, Robert Patterson, class of 1876, presented it to the Library. Call number: PTT 2865.1476

The Publisher’s file copies for over two hundred issues of The Glocester Journal for 1794-97

Glocester.Journal

“The publisher’s file copies for over two hundred issues of The Glocester Journal for 1794-97 (volumes 73-76), all but three numbers profusely annotated with information about each advertisement – how many times it has been inserted, the name of the advertiser, and how long it was to be run for. This is an exceptional discovery: not only are runs of 18th century provincial newspapers extremely rare outside the major libraries, but files copies originating from the publishing house and comprehensively annotated by the partners are, surely, almost unknown.

“Many of the notes are signed ‘R.R.’, which must mean that the paper was actively run by its publisher Robert Raikes (1736-1811), who had inherited this profitable and influential newspaper from his father and namesake (d. 1757) a week before his twenty-first birthday. Raikes went on to run the Journal for almost fifty years, retiring only in 1802 and dying nine years later, becoming a pillar of Gloucester society and a leading figure amongst its citizenry.

“This set must have served two purposes to the printing office of the Journal: first, as a record of the newspaper over four years of its existence in the mid-1790s; second, as a record of which advertisements had been run before, and how long they were to stand for. ‘First’, ‘3d’ ‘2 more’, ‘till forbid’ (presumably, until further notice) are reasonably clear, but a few other recurrent notes, such as ‘In turn’, ‘Tymbs’, ‘Heath’, ‘Wilkes’ (these last three the names of the advertiser, one assumes), ‘Taylor & Paper’ and others may need interpretation, as will the initials of those signing the notes – R.R. is common, but other initials are also found, M.W. being the most common.

❧ The above paragraphs are extracted from the description of antiquarian bookseller Christopher Edwards, from whom the Library purchased these issues in March 2013. These issues not only provide evidence about publisher’s practices but also serve as material for such research into provincial newspapers as found in John Jefferson Looney, Advertising and Society in England, 1720-1820: a statistical analysis of Yorkshire newspaper advertisements. Thesis (Ph.D.)–Princeton University, 1983.

• Call number: (Ex) Oversize Item 6561945e

Sylvia Beach and the Bard sharing a goblet of wine

In her memoir Shakespeare & Company (1960), Sylvia Beach writes: “I have a treasure too, the bookplate Gordon Craig made for me. Like the least thing he made, his little Shakespeare with bookseller kneeling at his feet is fascinating.”

20140128111426_001
Gordon Craig, noting shortages due to the war, writes ‘Just a few of your bookplates on gummed paper – a rarety! If you wish for more do find some paper. S['il]. V[ous]. P[lait]. 17.4.45 EGC.’
SB.bookplate0
‘At last a nice print of the little nothing —’ (in Gordon Craig’s handwriting).
SB.bookplate.envelope
Sylvia Beach’s handwritten notes on her envelope for the bookplates.

❧ Her bookplate appears in a number of her books held by Princeton in the separately arranged book collection called the ‘Beach Collection.’ For details as to how this collection came to the Library as well as information about her books not held here, see a related blog post “The Dispersal of Sylvia Beach’s Books.”

Further details about this bookplate are in John Blatchly, The Bookplates of Edward Gordon Craig (London, 1997) p. 22 ff.

Originals above are located in the Sylvia Beach Papers (C0108), box 16, folder 28, held by the Manuscripts Division,
Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, Princeton University Library.

James Asperne, Bookseller • 1816

Asperne.32.Cornhill.detail

[Above] Detail of shopfront: Frontispiece to the European Magazine, Volume 69.
Drawn and engraved by Samuel Rawle (1771-1860).

Asperne.32.Cornhill

James Asperne (1757-1820), bookseller and publisher of the The European Magazine. In 1803, he became successor to John Sewell at the Bible, Crown and Constitution, No. 32 Cornhill.

His portrait can be found in the online collections of the National Portrait Gallery.
http://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/person/mp53135/james-asperne

For a description of the Frontispiece, see page 6 ff of The European Magazine Volume 69, January to June at http://books.google.com/books?id=NCkoAAAAYAAJ

1761 • Banning Jesuit books

1761.Arret.banning.Jesuit.books

Arrêt de la Cour de Parlement, du 6 août 1761.
A Paris : Chez P. G. Simon, Imprimeur du Parlement, rue de la Harpe, à l’Hercule 1761]. Arrêt, with contemporary manuscript annotations, interdicting a list of twenty-four Jesuit books which, in turn, were to be ‘lacerés et brûlés en la Cour du Palais, au pied du grand escalier d’icelui’ in August 1761, having been deemed ‘seditious, destructive in respect to the principles of Christian morals, proposing abominable doctrines not only against the life of common citizens but against the life of the sacred person of the sovereign.’ Call number: (Ex) Oversize Item 6740870Q

The Embleme of Humane Life • 1670

“For the better direction of the Reader, and greater ease of his Memory, there is at the end of this little Book, a piece of Sculpture, exhibiting the Embleme itself, and a short Explication, by way of Figures, in the Cut, answerable to other in the Leaf next adjoining thereto, the Description of it might be the more familiar.”

The Life, and Philosophy, of Epictetus. With The Embleme of Humane Life, by Cebes. Rendred into English, by John Davies of Kidwelly (London: printed by T[homas]. R[oycroft]. for John Martyn, and are to be sold at the sign of the Bell without Temple Bar, 1670). Call number: (Ex) B561.E6 E5 1670 copy 2.

❧ For another example of the Tabula Cebetis and further details, see
http://blogs.princeton.edu/notabilia/2012/07/21/tabula-cebetis/ as well as Tamara A. Goeglein, “Early Modern Emblem Books as Memorial Sites,” Princeton University Library Chronicle (Autumn, 2007), p. 43-70.

1670.tabula.plate

1670.table

Dodona’s Grove: an early English publisher’s binding (1650)

Copy to come

Dendrologia. Dodona’s grove, or The vocall forest. Second part. By James Howell esquire [London, : Printed by W.H. for Humphrey Moseley, and are to be sold at his shop ..., 1650.] Call number: RHT 17th-324

The Library’s copy in the Robert H. Taylor Collection is comparable to copies at Folger, University of Pennsylvania, the Bodleian, and the British Library. According to Frank Mowrey (Folger): “One of the earliest English ‘publisher’s’ bindings, decorated with a block specially cut for the book. … [However] this does not mean that the whole edition would have been bound in this way, as was the case with 19th-century and later publisher’s bindings.” ❧ Brown sheepskin over pasteboards with blind, gilt, and silver decoration. Two-line border in blind. Covers blocked in silver with an oval panel of three trees lettered “DODONA’S GROVE” inside a wreath. Red and black sprinkled edges. ❧ The Taylor copy also has contemporary manuscript annotations identifying the original corresponding to each allegorical name.

Charles Clark (1806-1880) of Great Totham Hall, and Heybridge, Essex

20131115155555_002.label
Clark2-Ex.TL618 .S37q

Clark1

Booklabel, front cover and initial page of “Scrap Book on Aerostation,” complied by the antiquarian book-collector, amateur printer, and farmer Charles Clark (1806-1880) of Great Totham Hall, and Heybridge, Essex. [Call number: (Ex) TL618 .S37q]

❧ Clark is the focus of a book history research project conducted by Carrie Griffin, Teaching Fellow, University of Bristol, & Mary O’Connell, Leverhulme Visiting Researcher, School of English, University of St Andrews. They present their findings in the blog “Finding Charles Clark 1806-1880. Not just another book collector.” [Link]

❧ Recently they posted a short, engaging essay [Link] about Clark’s “Aerostation” compilation, a work consisting of approximately 46 pages of engravings, newspaper clippings, broadsides, songs and handbills on ballooning, dating from 1769 to the late 1820s, including as well material on the activities of balloonists Charles Green, the Montgolfiers, James Sadler and John Wilkes.

Mrs Jane Mecom, Her Book • 1769

Benjamin Franklin. Experiments and observations on electricity, made at Philadelphia in America, by Benjamin Franklin, L.L.D. and F.R.S. To which are added, letters and papers on philosophical subjects. The whole corrected, methodized, improved, and now first collected into one volume. London: Printed for David Henry; and sold by Francis Newberry, MDCCLXIX.

Benjamin Franklin. Experiments and observations on electricity, made at Philadelphia in America, by Benjamin Franklin, L.L.D. and F.R.S. To which are added, letters and papers on philosophical subjects. The whole corrected, methodized, improved, and now first collected into one volume. London: Printed for David Henry; and sold by Francis Newberry, MDCCLXIX. Call number: (Ex) QC516 .F852 copy 2.

“Franklin sent his sister a copy from London on February 23, 1769, writing, ‘There has lately been a new Edition of my philosophical Papers here. I send Six Copies to you, which I desire you would take care to have delivered as directed. There is one for your Trouble.’ Jane’s copy of this edition is housed at [the] Princeton [University] Library. It is inscribed ‘[Mrs] Jane Mecom, Her Book.” [Franklin biographer, Carl] Van Doren probably acquired this book in the 1930s; it went to Princeton with Van Doren’s papers following his death in 1950.” — Jill Lepore, Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin (New York: Knopf, 2013), p. 315 (part of ‘Appendix F. Jane’s Library,’ p.312 to 323)

Jill Lepore adds “I have been able to locate five volumes inscribed with her name: … [Experiments being one of the five] … I have no reason to suppose these five volumes are the same five volumes found in her house at her death. Her letters reveal her to have either owned or read a wealth of books, magazines, and newspapers …” (p.313)

Martin Meurisse’s Garden of Logic • 1614

 Artificiosa totius logices descriptio. Author/Artist: Meurisse, Martin, 1584-1644. Published/Created: Paris? : s.n., 1614?  General: 1 sheet ([1] p.) : ill. (etching) ; 60 x 40 cm. (plate mark 56 x 37 cm.)  Notes: Dedication signed: F. M. Meurisse.  At foot of sheet: De hac Thesi horis et dieb[us] solitis respondebunt fratres logici in Conventu fratrum minorum Parisiensium a Calendas Iunij ad Calendas Augusti Anno Domini MDCXIIII.  Two sheets pasted together, with the coat of arms of J.A. de Thou and the Franciscans, dedication to Thou and title on the upper half, and elaborate emblematic illustration below.

Artificiosa totius logices descriptio. ['Artful
description of logic in its entirety'] [by] Martin Meurisse, 1584-1644.
Published: Paris: s.n., 1614
Description: 1 sheet ([1] p.) : ill. (engraving) ; 60 x 40 cm. (plate mark 56 x 37 cm.)
Notes: Dedication signed: F. M. Meurisse.
At foot of sheet: De hac Thesi horis et dieb[us] solitis respondebunt fratres logici in Conventu fratrum minorum Parisiensium a Calendas Iunij ad Calendas Augusti Anno Domini MDCXIIII. ['The logician brothers will respond to this thesis in the Convent of the Friars Minor at Paris at the usual hours and days from the calends of June (first day) to the calends of August in the year of our Lord 1614.'] • Two sheets pasted together, with the coat of arms of J.A. de Thou and the Franciscans, dedication to Thou and title on the upper half, and elaborate emblematic illustration below. Call number: Princeton Univeristy Library. Rare Book Division: (EX) Broadside 119
For large image: http://libweb5.princeton.edu/visual_materials/Misc/Art_tot_log_des/atld.jpg

For an admirable study of this wonderful artifact of 17th century learning, see Susanna Berger, “Martin Meurisse’s Garden of Logic” in Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, Volume LXXVI (2013), p. 203-250. [Link]

“It is not in the power of the keeper of a lottery-office to command success”

State Lottery 1761. ... Sold and Registered by  A. and C. Corbett, Booksellers, at their Correct State Lottery Office, .. at Addison’s-Head, directly facing St. Dunstan’s Church, Fleet-Street.   Not recorded in ESTC.  Tipped onto final page of A new and easy method to understand the Roman history ...  translated from the French, with very large additions and amendments, by Mr. Tho. Brown.(London, 1748). Call number (Ex) 2012-0846N

State Lottery 1761. … Sold and Registered by A. and C. Corbett, Booksellers and Publishers, at their Correct State Lottery Office, .. at Addison’s-Head, facing St. Dunstan’s Church, Fleet-Street. Broadside not recorded in ESTC. Tipped onto final page of A New and Easy Method to Understand the Roman History … Translated from the French, with very large additions and amendments, by Mr. Tho. Brown.(London, 1748). Call number (Ex) 2012-0846N

1808, May 8. Died, Sir Charles Corbett, bart. one of the oldest liverymen of the company of stationers, aged about 76. He was, in the outset of life, well known as a bookseller, opposite St. Dunstan’s church; where he afterwards kept a lottery-office; had dame Fortune at his command; and used to astonish the gaping crowd with the brilliancy of his nocturnal illuminations. But it is not in the power of the keeper of a lottery-office to command success. A very unfortunate mistake in the sale of a chance of a ticket, which came up a prize of £20,000, proved fatal to Mr. Corbett, and was with difficulty compromised, the chance having fallen into the hands of Edward Roe Yeo, esq, at that time M.P. for Coventry. Some years after, the empty title of baronet (a title, in his case, not strictly recognised in the college of arms) descended to Mr. Corbett, which he assumed, though he might have received a handsome douceur from some other branch of the family if he would relinquish it.—Melancholy to relate! the latter days of this inoffensive character were clouded by absolute penury. Except a very trifling pension from the company of stationers, he had no means of subsistence but the precarious one of being employed, when his infirmities and bad state of health would permit him, in a very subordinate portion of the labours of a journeyman bookbinder.” – Charles Henry Timperley, The Dictionary of Printer and Printing, with the Progress of Literature (London, 1839) p. 832

❧ There is a copy of Ann and Charles Corbett’s lottery broadside for the year before (1760) held at OSU. [Link]

Booklabel: Simon Villers, His Book, Coventry, April 12, 1763, pasted onto inside front board of  A New and Easy Method to Understand the Roman History ...  Translated from the French, with very large additions and amendments, by Mr. Tho. Brown.(London, 1748). Call number (Ex) 2012-0846N

Booklabel: Simon Villers, His Book, Coventry, April 12, 1763, pasted onto front free endpaper of A New and Easy Method to Understand the Roman History … Translated from the French, with very large additions and amendments, by Mr. Tho. Brown.(London, 1748). Call number (Ex) 2012-0846N

Typewriter Printed Book • First of the Kind • 1919

1919.headline

“It was bound to come. With the holiday season approaching, with book-lovers looking forward to new fiction, to special editions and illuminated texts, with nearly all the book and job compositors in New York City anticipating the festive season by beginning their “vacations” a few months earlier than ordinary people, and with pressmen “locked out” because of secession, something just had to be done to fill the want created by type that would not be set and presses that would not turn. So, enter the first book ever printed without the aid of typesetters or regular pressmen.

“It is “Piggie,” in itself an unusual book in that it romances so whole-souledly about hogs that one turns page 300 undecided whether to characterize it as the Pollyanna of the Chicago stockyards or as a post-bellum impressionistic conception of the true, inward piggishness of man. …” [Link to the complete article in 30 November 1919 issue of The New York Times]

1919.Piggie.jacket

“A novelty of book making. This book was written with a typewriter, the typewritten pages were photographed, and the book printed from the photographic plates. This was made necessary by a strike in the printing trades of New York, which prevented publication of books in the usual manner. The book is a pleasing innovation of permanent value, and perhaps may be the forerunner of the form in which all books of the future will be issued.” – Dustjacket of Piggie (New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1919).

1919.Piggie.tp

For more on ‘typewriter printed books’ see Printing without Type-setters, a composite volume of three numbers of the Literary Digest and other matter relating to the printers’ strike in 1919, gathered by Byron A. Finney, reference librarian emeritus at the University of Michigan. (Prime example of library use of the ‘typewriter printed book’ and still very valuable: Dictionary Catalog of the Research Libraries of the New York Public Library, 1911-1971 (G. K. Hall, 1979) in 800 volumes. It replicates the unique typewritten cards once filed alphabetically in thousands of wooden catalog drawers now vanished from the third floor of the Schwartsman Building.)

❧ Call number for the Princeton copy of Piggie is: (Ex) Item 6763728.

1919.Piggie.p.1

1919.Piggie.case

Revival of Self: an Original Comedy, first published in 1856

Now
Sidney Frances Bateman’s 1856 play “Self,” at the Metropolitan Playhouse, offers timeless humor centered on social climbers.
❧ Review and picture in The New York Times: http://nyti.ms/1fN1vvi

Then

self_1

self_2

self_3

Self: an original comedy, in three acts by Mrs. Sidney F. Bateman; to which are added, a description of the costume, cast of the characters, entrances and exits, relative position of the performers on the stage, and the whole of the stage business. (New York: Samuel French [1856]) Call number: Princeton University Library, Rare Book Division, TC023 (Playbooks Collection) Box 8.
      Note: This copy marked for the part of “Aunt Chloe: an old colored Nurse.”

Remnant of ream wrapper on binder’s pasteboard (late 17th century)

Binding covering: Miscellany poems and translations by Oxford hands. London : Printed for Anthony Stephens, Bookseller ... in Oxford, 1685. [bound with]  Poems and essays, with a paraphrase on Cicero's Lælius, or, Of friendship  [by Edward Howard]. -- London : J. C. for W. Place, 1673.  Call number: RHT 17th-323

Exposed upper layer of pasteboard showing wrapper fragment with figure of posthorn and notation “Fine Paper.” This is the interior side of the front board of a late 17th century calfskin binding covering: Miscellany poems and translations by Oxford hands. London : Printed for Anthony Stephens, Bookseller … in Oxford, 1685. [bound with] Poems and essays, with a paraphrase on Cicero’s Lælius, or, Of friendship [by Edward Howard]. — London : J. C. for W. Place, 1673. Call number: RHT 17th-323. Other binding particulars: boards blind tooled with double line fillet frame and floral corner tool; edges in blind with garland tool; sewn on six single raised alum tawed supports, only four laced through the boards.

Sultan Sham

Frontispiece to  Sultan Sham, and his seven wives : an historical, romantic, heroic poem, in three cantos   by Hudibras, the younger. London : Printed and published by W. Benbow, 1820. Call number: (Ex) DA538.A2 Q4 1820 v.1. no. 13.

Frontispiece by J. Lewis Marks (c. 1796-1855) for the pseudonymous satirical pamphlet: Sultan Sham, and his seven wives : an historical, romantic, heroic poem, in three cantos by Hudibras, the younger. London : Printed and published by W. Benbow, 1820. Call number: (Ex) DA538.A2 Q4 1820 v.1. no. 13.• The publisher, William Benbow, amply issued popular anti-Regent literature and favored Caroline in disputes with her husband, who became king in 1820. • The ‘Collection Online’ website of the British Museum describes its copy in great detail, but does not provide a digital image.

New data about an Elizabethan stationer

Gower1

anno 1569 . februarye 13 .,.
L[awrence] Graham owneth me and bought me of Jhon Judson Stacyoner
in paules church yard, at the signe of the Hedghogge, anno, 1569 .,

John Judson, Stationer in London, 1542?-1589? [per K.F. Panzer, Printers’ and Publishers’ Index [STC, vol. 3: London, 1991]. This inscription provides a dated, mid-career address for Judson. No address recorded for him in H.R. Plomer, Abstracts from the Wills of English Printers and Stationers (London, 1903), p. 28. The British Book Trade Index provides addresses only for the beginning and end of his career.

This inscription on the title page of John Gower, De Confessione amantis London: Thomas Berthelette, 1554 (ESTC S120946) Call number: (Ex) 3757.9.32.12. Also, note this copy once owned and annotated by John Horne Tooke (1736-1812).

Gower.full

“Fifteen Thousand copies of this Poem were sold in the City of London…”

Charles H. Wharton. A Poetical Epistle to His Excellency George  Washington, Esquire, Commander in Chief (London reprinted for C. Dilly, in the Poultry; J. Almon, Piccadilly; W. Tesseyman, York; T. and J. Merrill, Cambridge; R. Cruttwell, Bath; and T. Becket, Bristol, 1780). Call number: Kane Americana 1780 Wharton

Charles H. Wharton. A Poetical Epistle to His Excellency George
Washington, Esquire, Commander in Chief
(London reprinted for C. Dilly, in the Poultry; J. Almon, Piccadilly; W. Tesseyman, York; T. and J. Merrill, Cambridge; R. Cruttwell, Bath; and T. Becket, Bristol, 1780). Call number: Kane Americana 1780 Wharton ❧
❧ “The sole motive for republishing this Poem, and adding thereto a sketch of the Life and Character of General Washington (which the Editor now gives to the reader in the plain unaltered narrative of the Author, who is connected and intimate in the family of that great man) is for the charitable purpose of raising a few guineas to relieve, in a small measure, the distresses of some hundreds of American prisoners, now suffering confinement in the gaols of England. The profits arising from the sale of this book will be faithfully appropriated to that purpose; and this the Editor rests assured will be a much stronger incitement for the benevolent and humane to become purchasers of it, than any intrinsic value the performance may demand.” — Advertisement (p.3)

“Fifteen Thousand copies of this Poem were sold in the City of London, in about Three Weeks, at Two Shillings and Sixpence sterling, each, and the Money appropriated to the Benefit of the American Prisoners in England.” — at end of front matter headed “Advertisement to the London edition” in the 1782 Springfield, MA reprinting of this poem. ❧ ESTC records 25 copies. Perhaps some data useful for determining the perishment of printed books over time? If we give credence to the 1782 claim, then the instance of survival for this London edition is 1.7 copies per thousand.

Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke • Shelf-mark

“All volumes uniformly bound in dull red morocco, with a heavy gilt back and a very narrow dentelle around the sides, usually with small fleurons in the angles. Shelfmarks in pale red ink on the upper right hand corner of the first flyleaf [and instructions to the binder pencilled in capitals on the first page of the book usually consisting of the lettering he wanted on label of book]: Examples: “Dd.8″,”Lo.5″,”Vh.3″ Library at Wilton House, near Salisbury. Sales: 25 Jun 1914 (Sotheby); 15 Mar 1920; 3 Dec 1951; 4 Feb 1963. WAJ:DeR 40,41 DRsc” — from the notes of Denis Woodfield (1933-2013)
Horace. Entendimento literal, e constrvicão, portvgveza de todas as obras de Horacio ... Latinos lyricos, com index copioso das historias, & fabulas conteudas nellas. Emendado nesta 2. impressaõ por industria de Matheus Rodriguez 	 Lisboa, Na officina de H. Valente de Oliueira, 1657. Call number: PTT 2865.1657

Horace. Entendimento literal, e constrvicão, portvgveza de todas as obras de Horacio … Latinos lyricos, com index copioso das historias, & fabulas conteudas nellas. Emendado nesta 2. impressaõ por industria de Matheus Rodriguez Lisboa, Na officina de H. Valente de Oliueira, 1657. Call number: PTT 2865.1657



Another example at the University of Pennsylvania
Earl of Pembroke shelf-mark - Example from University of Pennsylvania
http://www.flickr.com/photos/58558794@N07/9629590746/

Chirm’s banded bindings.

“To prevent Mistakes and Impositions, these printed Bills are placed in the Front of every Book in the banded Binding and in no other. March 11, 1776”

Front pastedown and recto of front free endpaper of George Fisher, The Instructor:or, Young Man's Best Companion Twenty second edition (London, 1775) Price bound 2s. 6d.  ESTC N8733  [Call number: (Ex)  Item 6617351]

Authenticating “bills” serving as front pastedown and front free endpaper of George Fisher, The Instructor:or, Young Man’s Best Companion Twenty second edition (London, 1775) Price bound 2s. 6d. ESTC N8733 [Call number: (Ex) Item 6617351]

“In 1776, the bookseller Sylvanus Chirm also made an attempt to replace ‘the deceitful Practice of stabbed Bindings’ with books sewn on bands, … ” (N. Pickwoad, “Bookbinding in the eighteenth century,” Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, Volume 5. 1695–1830, p.287)

Chirm describes ‘binding in the common manner’ and his remedy:

“It is called the punch’d or stabb’d Binding, and is done as follows: The Sheets
being folded into a Book, two Holes punched. thro’ them near the Back, and a
String drawn thro’ each Hole, into the Pasteboard Sides is the chief Fastening;
the Books bound this Way are made to open stiff at first, in order to appear strong;
but that is a mere Deception: opening them wide (as Children are apt to do)
strains them so much that some of the Leaves are soon torn off the Strings, and
become loose. Sometimes one or both the Strings break, and the whole Book then
falls to Pieces. To remedy this Evil, a Method is now adopted, of binding these
Books (as well as all others) upon Bands: these Bands are laid across the Back, and
every Leaf is sewed down to them, which with proper glewing, renders the Book
so strong and durable, as to do more than twice the Service of those bound the
common Way.”

Pickwoad further notes that the project was taken over by Chirm’s partner and successor, George Herdsfield

 "School Books in Chirm's Binding" http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015063895281;view=1up;seq=8 Charles Marshall. A practical introduction to arithmetic; or, The teacher of arithmetic's assistant: containing, arithmetic of whole numbers, with vulgar, decimal, and duodecimal fractions. To which is added, an appendix of directions and examples for receipts, promissory notes, bills of exchange, bills of parcels, bills of book-debts, and letters; with various exercises on the same.Fifth Edition. London: Printed for G. Herdsfield, 1789.

“School Books in Chirm’s Binding”
http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015063895281;view=2up;seq=8
Charles Marshall. A practical introduction to arithmetic; or, The teacher of arithmetic’s assistant: containing, arithmetic of whole numbers, with vulgar, decimal, and duodecimal fractions. To which is added, an appendix of directions and examples for receipts, promissory notes, bills of exchange, bills of parcels, bills of book-debts, and letters; with various exercises on the same.Fifth Edition. London: Printed for G. Herdsfield, 1789.
[Label of successor, George Herdsfield, is from example at the University of Michigan]

For more on this project designed to improve the sturdiness of the bindings of school books, see A. N. L. Munby, “Chirm’s banded bindings” Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society Vol. 1, No. 2, 1950, p. 181-186.

“Fill in the blank” Dedicatee

[W. Howard] The Happy Government: or, the Constitution of Great-Britain. Humbly Presented to the [----]. London: Printed for the author, 1738.  Call number: (Ex) AC911.xE53

[W. Howard] The Happy Government: or, the Constitution of Great-Britain. Humbly Presented to the [----]. London: Printed for the author, 1738.[ESTC N32837; variant of Foxon H340] Call number: (Ex) AC911.xE53, no. 8.

Note inscription after ‘Humbly Presented to the’

“the most Hona[ble] John Hay, marquess & Earl of Tweed[dale], one of his Majesty. Principal Secret[ary] of State.”

Eighteenth-century poet W. Howard was described as “an aged and infirm man, in order to relieve his wants, circulated his [poetry] by printing on every title-page an address to some distinguished person.” Foxon’s English Verse 1701-1750 records several titles published between 1730 and 1747 “issued with variant title-pages with alternative dedicatees” (cf. H337 to H344). • In this instance, the dedicatee is John Hay (1695-1762), fourth marquess of Tweeddale. According to the Oxford DNB, he became principal secretary of state for Scotland in 1742. This is some years after the poem’s printing in 1738, suggesting that Howard used his stock as occasions developed, rather than distribute it all at one time.

Books sold by Nath. Crouch: Histories, Admirable Curiosities, Extraordinary Adventures, Unparallel’d Varieties.

Admirable curiosities rarities, & wonders in England, Scotland, and Ireland, or, An account of many remarkable persons and places, and likewise of the battels, seiges, prodigious earthquakes, tempests, inundations, thunders, lightnings, fires, murders, and other considerable occurrences, and accidents for several hundred years past. Together with the natural, and artificial rarities in every county, and many other observable matters; as they are recorded by the most authentick, and credible historians of former and latter ages; adorned with the lively description of several memorable things therein contained, ingraven on copper plates. By R. B., author of the History of the wars of England, &c. and Remarks of London, &c (London: Printed by Tho. Snowden, for Nath. Crouch, 1683)  Call number: Ex 3701.276 vol 1.

Admirable curiosities rarities, & wonders in England, Scotland, and Ireland, or, An account of many remarkable persons and places, and likewise of the battels, seiges, prodigious earthquakes, tempests, inundations, thunders, lightnings, fires, murders, and other considerable occurrences, and accidents for several hundred years past. Together with the natural, and artificial rarities in every county, and many other observable matters; as they are recorded by the most authentick, and credible historians of former and latter ages; adorned with the lively description of several memorable things therein contained, ingraven on copper plates. By R. B., author of the History of the wars of England, &c. and Remarks of London, &c (London: Printed by Tho. Snowden, for Nath. Crouch, 1683) Call number: Ex 3701.276 vol 1.

London bookseller Nathaniel Crouch (ca. 1640-1725) published his ‘histories’ under the pseudonym R.B. (alluding to Robert or Richard Burton). According to a contemporary, he “melted down the best of our English Histories into Twelve-Penny Books” and became a “Celebrated Author.” His works for the “middling sort” sold well, with some known to have gone into as many as thirteen editions. Thousands of illustrated, cheaply produced copies were issued, but few survive today. In 1918, publisher Charles Scribner II (1854-1930) presented a collection of “Burton’s books” and the Library collocated them at call number Ex 3701.276, subdivided by volume number, as follows:

Vol. 1. Admirable Curiosities. 1682.
Vol. 2. Admirable Curiosities. 10th Ed. 1737.
Vol. 3. England’s Monarchs. 2d Ed… Enl. 1685.
Vol. 4. The English Empire in America. 5th Ed. 1711.
Vol. 5. The English Hero. 13th Ed. [1739]
Vol. 6. Extraordinary Adventures, Revolutions and Events. 3d Ed. 1704.
Vol. 7. The General History of Earthquakes. 1734.
Vol. 8. Historical Remarques and Observations. 4th Ed. 1691.
Vol. 9. The History of The Kingdom of Ireland. 12th Ed. [A much enl. Ed. of 2d pt. of v. 170] 1746.
Vol. 10. The History of The Kingdoms of Scotland & Ireland. 1685.
Vol. 11. The History of The Nine Worthies of The World. 1727.
Vol. 12. The History of The Principality of Wales. 1695.
Vol. 13. The History of The Two Late Kings, Charles The Second and James The Second. 1693.
Vol. 14. The Ladies Glory. 5th Ed. 1781.
Vol. 15. Martyrs in Flames. 1700.
Vol. 16. The Surprizing Miracles of Nature and Art. 2d Ed. 1685.
Vol. 17. Two Journeys To Jerusalem. 1695.
Vol. 18. The Unfortunate Court-Favourites of England. 2d Ed. 1706.
Vol. 19. The Unhappy Princesses. 1733.
Vol. 20. Unparallel’d Varieties. 3d Ed. 1699.
Vol. 21. Unparallel’d Varieties. 4th Ed. 1728.
Vol. 22. The Wars in England. 5th Ed… Enl. 1684.
Vol. 23. Youth’s Divine Pastime. 5th Ed. 1767.
Vol. 24. The Wars in England, Scotland & Ireland … 6th Ed., Rev. and Cor. 1697.
Vol. 25. Historical Remarks and Observations upon the Ancient and Present State of London and Westminster … 5th Ed. 1703.

Martyrs in flames: or The history of Popery. Displaying the horrid persecutions and cruelties, exercised upon Protestants by the Papists for many hundred years past, to this time. In, Piedmont. France, with the massacre at Paris. Orange. Ephemia. Germany. Poland. Lithuania. Italy. Spain, with the bloody Inquisition. Portugal. Holland. Flanders. Scotland. Ireland, with the massacre in 1641. and England. Containing an account of I. The martyrs in the reign of King Henry VIII. and Queen Mary. II. The Spanish invasion 1588. III. The Gun-powder Treason 1605. IV. The fire of London 1666. V. The horrid Popish plot in 1678. VI. The marther of Sir Edmunbury Godfrey. VII. The detectable conspiracies of the Papists, and their adherents against K. William III. 1. By Grandivile a Frenchman. 2. By Charnock, Sir Wil. Perkins, Sir John Friend, Sir John Fenwick, and others, with their tryals and execution[.] Also Gods judgments upon persecutors. With several pictures By R.B. (London: N. Couch, 17xx).  Call number Ex 3701.276 vol 15.  • No copy recorded in ESTC.

Martyrs in flames: or The history of Popery. Displaying the horrid persecutions and cruelties, exercised upon Protestants by the Papists for many hundred years past, to this time. In, Piedmont. France, with the massacre at Paris. Orange. Ephemia. Germany. Poland. Lithuania. Italy. Spain, with the bloody Inquisition. Portugal. Holland. Flanders. Scotland. Ireland, with the massacre in 1641. and England. Containing an account of I. The martyrs in the reign of King Henry VIII. and Queen Mary. II. The Spanish invasion 1588. III. The Gun-powder Treason 1605. IV. The fire of London 1666. V. The horrid Popish plot in 1678. VI. The marther of Sir Edmunbury Godfrey. VII. The detectable conspiracies of the Papists, and their adherents against K. William III. 1. By Grandivile a Frenchman. 2. By Charnock, Sir Wil. Perkins, Sir John Friend, Sir John Fenwick, and others, with their tryals and execution[.] Also Gods judgments upon persecutors. With several pictures By R.B. (London: Nath. Crouch, 1700). Call number Ex 3701.276 vol 15. • No copy recorded in ESTC.

For further details see: Robert Mayer, “Nathaniel Crouch, Bookseller and Historian: Popular Historiography and Cultural Power in Late Seventeenth-Century England,” Eighteenth-Century Studies v. 27, no. 3 (Spring, 1994), pp. 391-419.

Oxford binding • 1636 • Hatching

“Oxford binders developed a habit for two-way hatching patterns [on the board edges], finishing a row of diagonal hatching with a few rows running horizontally, or diagonally the other way; this can be a useful rule of thumb for recognising Oxford work between about 1580 and 1650, …” – David Pearson, English Bookbinding Styles, 1450-1800 (London: British Library, 2005), p. 113. Oxford.hatching.0
“One very distinctive feature of nearly all Oxford bindings executed between 1580 and 1620, and of a certain number between the latter date and about 1670, is the ‘hatching’ at the head and tail of the back. This consists of diagonal lines, …” — Strickland Gibson, Early Oxford Bindings (Oxford: Bibliographical Society, 1903), p. 41 (see also Plate XXX) Oxford.hatching.foot.of.spine.0

Exemplar: Peter Heylyn, Mikrokosmos: a Little Description of the Great World. Oxford : Printed by William Turner, and are to be sold at the black Beare in Pauls Church-yard [by M. Allott, London], 1636. Call number: (Ex) 1007.461.11.

The Compleat Troller: Original (1682) vs. Type-facsimile (ca. 1772-1790)

Robert Nobbes (1652-1706?). The Compleat Troller. London, 1682. ESTC R202195. Title page

Robert Nobbes (1652-1706?). The Compleat Troller. London, 1682. ESTC R17278. Title page. Call number: (ExKa) Special 1682 Nobbes.

Robert Nobbes (1652-1706?). The Compleat Troller. [London, 1790?]. ESTC R202195. Title page.

Robert Nobbes (1652-1706?). The Compleat Troller. [London, 1790?]. ESTC R202195. Title page. Call number: (ExKi) SH459.xN6.

xxxxxx

Robert Nobbes (1652-1706?). The Compleat Troller. London, 1682. ESTC R17278. Page [1]. Call number: (ExKa) Special 1682 Nobbes.

zzzzz

Robert Nobbes (1652-1706?). The Compleat Troller. [London, 1790?]. ESTC R202195. Page [1]. Call number: (ExKi) SH459.xN6.

xxxxx

Robert Nobbes (1652-1706?). The Compleat Troller. London, 1682. ESTC R17278. Page 78 ff. Call number: (ExKa) Special 1682 Nobbes.

zzzzz

Robert Nobbes (1652-1706?). The Compleat Troller. [London, 1790?]. ESTC R202195. Page 78 ff. Call number: (ExKi) SH459.xN6.

Bookplate • 1582 • Johann Gesswein / Göswein of Schwäbisch Gmünd (Baden-Württemberg).

VRG.2945.1547.bookplate

1582 / Γvῶθι καὶ πoίει. / Sum [ex libris] M. Ioannis Gessvvini / Gamundiani.

I am [from the books of] M[agister] Johann Gesswein / Göswein of Schwäbisch Gmünd (Baden-Württemberg).

Virgil. Pub. Vergilii Maronis Opera / una cum annotatiunculis Philippi Melanchthonis.
Tiguri [Zurich]: apud Froschouerum, 1547.
Junius Spencer Morgan Collection (VRG) 2945.1547

Note related bookplate dated 1557 recorded in the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin:
[Wappen des Johannes Gessuvinus Gamundianus]

Earls of Shaftesbury • Shelf-mark

The characteristic shelf mark of the library in St. Giles House, Wimbourne, Dorset, seat of the Earls of Shaftesbury. Books from this library sold at Christie’s (London) in November 1966 and February 1967.
•••••••••
Other exemplars (based on a search of the Web):
• Inner D2-7 [details]
• Outer H3-29 [details]
• Outer H4-24 [details]
 Pierre Desmaizeaux,  1673?-1745. The Life of Mr. Bayle: in a letter to a Peer of Great Britain. London : s.n., 1708. Call number: (EX) BX9459.B39 D4713

Pierre Desmaizeaux, 1673?-1745.
The Life of Mr. Bayle: in a letter to a Peer of Great Britain.
London : s.n., 1708.
Call number: (EX) BX9459.B39 D4713
Shaftesbury shelf-mark: “Inner B4-32″

‘At the Commencement of our Civil War on that Continent’

Poetical.Excursions.1777

The anonymous author of these Poetical Excursions in the Isle of Wight (London, 1777) seasons his ‘animated and poetical’ topographical work with political notes. He praises Wilkes: “But on This I will insist: that He has very materially contributed to the Weal of Human Kind, by protracting the Life, and Spirit of the sickly Constitution of England.”(p. 19). He comments on the American rebels in a long footnote on page 37: “I drew this political, and martial Prospect of America, at the Commencement of our Civil War on that Continent. My Opinion of an Individual, or of a State, is not hastily formed; therefore it is nor changed, or influenced by superficial Observation, or false Narrative. I have by no means inferred from some trivial, and temporary Advantages gained by Government on the other Side of the Atlantick, nor from the servile Ostentation of private Correspondence, and Report nor from the pompous Tale of the Gazette, that the Americans are divided in their Councils; that They want Arms, Ammunition, Courage, and the Necessaries of Life; or that any of the Regal Officers deserve the Name of Generals: therefore I do not yet apprehend the Subjugation of our Colonies.” Depicted on the title page is Carisbrooke Castle (here spelled ‘Craisbrook’), prison of Charles I from 1647 to 1648, a meaningful emblem to those with Commonwealth republican leanings like the author. Just so that point is not lost the author adds the caption:

"An awful Pharos to each British King!"

“An awful Pharos to each British King!”

Poetical excursions in the Isle of Wight. London, N. Conant (Successor to Mr. Whiston), in Fleet Street. MDCCLXXVII [1777]. Call number: (Ex) in-process.

Supralibros of the College of Navarre

Supralibros-College.de.Navarre Cypher-College.de.Navarre
Library of the College de Navarre, Paris, in: J.W. Clark, The Care of Books (London, 1901) fig. 64

Library of the College de Navarre, Paris, in: J.W. Clark, The Care of Books (Cambridge, 1901) fig. 64. Built in 1509 and demolished in 1867.

Cypher composed of the interlaced and mirrored initials C R N [Collegium regium Navarricum], as identified in L. Bouland, “Monogramme du collège de Navarre” in Archives de la Société des collectionneurs d’ex-libris (Paris: 1895) [2d Année, No. 1, Janvier], pp 66-69.
[Text of article]

On covers and spine of Petri Gualterii Chabotii pictonis sanlupensis praelectionum in Q. Horatii Flacci poemata tomus primus[-tertius] : … cum catalogo auctorum, quorum in his commentariis usus fuit, & syllabo verborum et rerum memorabilium. (Basilae : Per Leonhardum Ostenium, MCXCI-MCXCIV [1591-1594]) [Call number: PTT 2865.1591q] [Also has the armorial bookplate of W[illia]m Constable, F.R.S. and F.A.S. (Franks 6646)]

The Reviewers Cave • 1768

Reviewers.cave

The Reviewers Cave. [Etched by P. J. De Loutherbourg (1740-1812)]. The frontispiece to The Powers of the Pen by Evan Lloyd (1734-1776). Second edition published London, Printed for the Author, … 1768. [Call number: RCPXR 3829.67.373] The etching is described in detail in Catalogue of prints and drawings in the British Museum. Division I, political and personal satires prepared by Frederic George Stephens, v. 4, no. 4247, (London, 1883). The description begins begins:”An etching showing a vast cave, where, recumbent on clouds overhead, the Genius of Dulness lies fast asleep. Many reviewers sit on benches, nearly filling the cavern; they include an ass who brays …” The description in full:

4247

Frontispiece [larger file]

Description [larger file]

Example of note by H.D. Lyon (1917-2004), London antiquarian bookseller

From the obituary of H.D. Lyon published in the Times (London) on 7 August 2004:

Lyon.writing

Lyon.note.Ex.1494.429.124q

Lyon’s note on front free endpaper of: John Anderson (1798-1839). Historical and genealogical memoirs of the house of Hamilton; with genealogical memoirs of the several branches of the family. Edinburgh, John Anderson, jun., London, Simpkin & Marshall, 1825. Presentation copy to William Beckford from the Duke of Hamilton, with Beckford’s manuscript notes. Binding has ticket: Bound by Carss & Co[mpan]y. Glasgow. • Lyon notes on the lower margin of Bernard Quaritch’s Hamilton Palace Library bookplate “Lot 241 in part 1 of sale £19/10/-” [Call number: (Ex) 1494.429.124q. Purchased from Lyon by the Princeton University Library in 1968.]

Obituary:
“H. D. Lyon.” Times [London, England] 7 Aug. 2004: 40.

Binds & Sells all sorts of Stationary Wares

AC128.Subseries. 1E.Ledgers.1769.ticket

John Dean Book-binder & Stationer at the Sign of Dean Swift in Front Street between Walnut & Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia, Binds & Sells all sorts of Stationary Wares. Journal, Bill-book, Sale-book, Ledger. Adams, Sc.

Trade card of John Dean, mounted on front paste-down of Ledger of the Trustees of the College of New Jersey, May 1st, 1769 (Call number: Mudd Library: AC128, Subseries 1E: Ledgers).

Engraved by Dunlap Adams, “Engraver in Front Street between Chesnut and Walnut streets,” as per his advertisement in the Pennsylvania Gazette, September 6, 1764.

Further details: Francis James Dallet, “A Colonial Binding and Engraving Discovery: the College Ledger of 1769,” Princeton University Library Chronicle, v.31, no.2 (Winter, 1970) [link to issue]

AC128.Subseries. 1E.Ledgers.1769.upper.cover

AC128.Subseries. 1E.Ledgers.1769.upper.cover.detail

Mrs Jane Mecom Her Book No. 11

Ex_QC516_F852_c2_TP_Copy

Benjamin Franklin’s sister, Mrs Jane Mecom, is the subject of a captivating article by Jill Lepore in The New Yorker for July 8 & 15, 2013. [link]. Perhaps Franklin sent his sister this book now in the Princeton University Library: Experiments and observations on electricity, made at Philadelphia in America, by Benjamin Franklin, L.L.D. and F.R.S. To which are added, letters and papers on philosophical subjects. The whole corrected, methodized, improved, and now first collected into one volume … London: Printed for David Henry; and sold by Francis Newberry, MDCCLXIX. Call number: (Ex) QC516 .F852 copy 2. [Given in 1954 by Margaret Van Doren Bevans, Barbara Van Doren Klaw, and Anne Van Doren Ross, daughters of the American historian and Franklin biographer, Carl Van Doren.]

Shelf-marks of Sunderland books

Sunderland.shelf.mark Horace. Ars poetica with commentary of Aldus Manutius (Venice, 1576) Call number: PTT 2865.311.076. [Shelf mark on verso of front free endpaper, which is marbled on recto. The front paste-down is marbled. These are the only marks of ownership.]
Sunderland.shelf.mark.De.R Charles Spencer, third Earl of Sunderland (1674-1722), his “books are easily recognizable by the bold shelf-marks written in ink on the verso of the upper cover in the upper left hand corner.” S. DeRicci, English Collectors of Books & Manuscripts (1530-1930) and Their Marks of Ownership (Cambridge, 1930), p. 39.

For more about the history of the Sunderland Library, see the record for the 18th century manuscript catalogue of the Library held at John Rylands Library:
http://archiveshub.ac.uk/data/gb133-engms62.txt

Arms of Charles d’Orléans-Valois, Duc d’Angoulème (1573-1650)

VRG.2945.311.Ita.581.arms.Charles.d’Orléans-Valois

L’Eneide di Virgilio del commendatore Annibal Caro Venetia, B. Giunti & fratelli, 1581. Call number: VRG 2945.311 Ita 581 (bound with Della Eneide di Vergilio il quarto libro tradotto in ottava rima per M. Gio. Battista Filippi. Genova, appresso Antonio Bellone, 1562.)

Also with the “CC” cypher of Charles d’Orléans-Valois. However without his arms present it is difficult to determine for certain if this was his.

VRG.2945.1542s.Chiffre.CC

Virgilius Paris, apud S. Colinaeum, 1542. Call number: VRG 2945.1542s

Marca de fuego: Colegio Apostólico de San Francisco (Pachuca, Mexico)

Ex.6069.314.946

According to Mercedes I. Salomón Salazar of the Biblioteca José María Lafragua (a contributor to the Catálogo Colectivo de Marcas de Fuego), this “marca de fuego” originates from the Colegio Apostólico de San Francisco (Pachuca, Mexico).

The brand can be found on Scotus moralis pro confessariis …in quo ea, quae subtilis doctor in quatuor Sententiarum, & quolibeta sparsim docuit, interrogatorij forma inspiciuntur by Bonaventura Theuli (1596-1670), published in Mexico by I.B. de Hogal, 1727. Call Number: (Ex) 6049.314.946.
For Catálogo Colectivo de Marcas de Fuego , see
http://www.marcasdefuego.buap.mx:8180/xmLibris/projects/firebrand/

Publishers catalogues • 19th century Britain

Ward.Lock.Box25.19th.cent.Brit.pub.cats.1
Ward.Lock.Box25.19th.cent.Brit.pub.cats.1a
Ward.Lock.Box25.19th.cent.Brit.pub.cats.3

Ward.Lock.Box25.19th.cent.Brit.pub.cats.3a
Ward.Lock.Box25.19th.cent.Brit.pub.cats.2

Ward.Lock.Box25.19th.cent.Brit.pub.cats.2a
Exemplars from the 1,800 recently acquired 19th Century British Publishers’ Catalogues, a collection arranged alphabetically by name of publisher in 31 boxes. These exceptional color-printed covers are found in box 25, covering Ward, Lock, & Co. The collection was put together chiefly by London antiquarian bookseller Donald Fraser, a project planned to culminate in a [never] published work titled London Publishers 1770-1880, with an Appendix on Binders’ Tickets, Quentin Books, Ltd. A full listing of the collection is available. [Link to listing.] The call number for the collection is: RCPXR-7017242. [Permalink for the main catalog record for this collection.]

An Enigmatic Binding • ca. 1565

Ex.N7710.J96.copy4.front Ex.N7710.J96.copy4.back

Front: Solitudo Acerbitas Mera — Solitude – Bitterness — Unadulterated
Back: Dulcis Comes Tilia — Sweet Companion — Linden Tree

 

 

Hadrianus Junius (Adriaan de Jonge), 1511-1575. Emblemata
Antwrep: Christophor Plantin, 1565. (Ex) N7710 .J96 copy 4

See William S. Hecksher “Heliotropes and Romantic Ruins,” Princeton University Library Chronicle 45:1 (Autumn, 1983), p. 39-40 for discussion.

Inscribed on front free endpaper: Me utitur Jacobus Reepmakerus.
Me.utitur
The books of Jacob Reepmaker were sold in 1701: Catalogus variorum insignium, & rarissimorum librorum … Jacobi Reepmakeri … quorum auctio publica habebitur in officina Joannis ab Oosterwyk … Ad diem 7 Junii [1701], & diebus sequentibus, etc. Amsterdam, 1701.

A Collector speaks to posterity

RHT.18.321.inscription
“This was the first old book I ever acquired. I bought it from Edgar H. Wells late in 1925 or early in 1926, and was up half the night reading and examining it. I did not know then that I had found the road to the most enduring friendships and the greatest pleasures of my life. R.H.T. Mar. 16, 1977.”
❧ Inscribed on front free endpaper of first volume of: Samuel Johnson. The Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets: With Critical Observations on their Works. A New Edition Corrected. (London, 1794) Call number: RHT 18th-321.
❧ Robert H. Taylor (1908-1985) made this purchase during months prior to entering Princeton with the class of 1930. His collection was deposited in Firestone Library in 1972 and was received as a bequest in 1985. A link to more about his collection.
RHT.18.321.titepage

Convicted in the Fualdès affair

Fualdes

Baptiste Colard, ex-soldat du train, un des prévenus de l’assassinat de Mr. Fualdès. Rouen : Imprimerie de C. Bloquel … , [1817]. 5, [3] p. : port. (woodcut) ; 21 cm. (8vo) Internal caption title: Cause célèbre : assassinat de M.Fualdès. Printed on laid paper. Call number: (Ex) 2012-0169N

For details on this recent acquisition, see
http://www.simonbeattie.kattare.com/blog/archives/749

In the United States, city and country newspapers from Maine to Virginia, such as The New York Spectator and Isaiah Thomas’s Massachusetts Spy carried news of the trial and the ensuing convictions.

MassSpy

Supralibros: Camille Aboussouan

Camille.Aboussouan

Supralibros of Camille Aboussouan. His books sold at Sotheby’s (London) 17th and 18th June 1993, The Library of Camille Aboussouan. His vita is available from UNESCO. He served as ambassador from Lebanon to UNESCO. Earlier this year, his death was announced [19/01/2013] by the Lebanese embassy in Paris.

Supralibros on front cover of Andrea Alicati, Emblemata (Paris, 1602). Call number (EX) N7710 .A35 1602.

Booklabel • Margaret Harrington • October, 5th. 1694

Harrington0

“Margaret Harrington” and the date “October, 5th. 1694” printed in letterpress within a frame of woodcut flowers emerging from two vases with a crown and crossed sceptres at the center top. Her booklabel as rear pastedown.

Harrington1

Her booklabel as front pastedown.

Woolley, Hannah, fl. 1670. The Queen-like closet, or, Rich Cabinet: Stored with all Manner of Rare Receipts for Preserving, Candying and Cookery, very pleasant and beneficial to all ingenious persons of the female sex: to which is added a supplement, presented to all ingenious ladies, and gentlewomen. The Third Edition. London : Printed for Richard Lowndes at the White Lion in Duck-Lane, near West-Smithfield, 1675. Call number (EX) 2013-0156N.

This label is not recorded in Brian North Lee Early Printed Book Labels: a Catalogue of Dated Personal Labels and Gift Labels Printed in Britain to the Year 1760 London, 1976.

Bookplate: Luton Library

Luton.Library

Arms of John Crichton-Stuart, 2nd Marquess of Bute (1793-1848). Luton Hoo in Bedfordshire was one of his four major seats. ❧ Franks 28448 (Stuart, Marquess of Bute.) Luton Library. (Arms. Stuart with North on an escutcheon. John, 2nd Marquess, married 1818 as his 1st wife Maria, daughter of George Augustus, 3rd Earl of Guilford. She died 1841.) ❧ On front pastedown of Junius, Hadrianus, 1511-1575. Batavia. Lvgdvni Batavorvm: ex officina Plantiniana, apud F. Raphelengium, 1588. Call number: (EX) 2007-0536N

Harrison Gray Otis 3rd (1822-1884) • Bookplate

On front pastedown of
Muret, Marc-Antoine, 1526-1585. Commentarii in Aristotelis X. libros Ethicorvm ad Nicomachum, & in Oeconomica : Aristotelis Topicorvm libri septimi et in evndem Alexandri Aphrodisiensis commentarij interpretatio. Commentarivs in Lib I et II. Platonis de Repvb. Notae in Cypropaediam et Xenophontis … Ingolstadij, Excudebat Adam Sartorivs, 1602. Call number (EX) 2599.828

Harrison Gray Otis 3d, b. 1822, Harvard LL.B. 1842. After fighting a duel in Washington in 1844 with one Schott, he settled in Thun, Switzerland.
Married Mary West. [Three children: • Harrison Gray Otis IV b. 1857 Bethany PA (Otis family summer home), d. sometime after his last recorded passport application dated 1897 • Arthur Otis b. 1860 Bethany PA, d. unknown. • Blanche Bordman Otis b. 1863, d. 1921] HGO 3d d. in Switzerland 1 April 1884.
❧ [Sources: S.E. Morison, Harrison Gray Otis (1969); Application for membership in the Sons of the American Revolution submitted by Arnim Edward Louis Otis Muller (grandson of HGO 3d); 1870 US Census; US Emergency Passport Applications (Issued Abroad), series for 1877-1907]

‘Maidenly Writings’ • Parthenicon libri iii • ca. 1606

Ex.PA8595.W452.P3.updated

“The writings of the Anglo-Latin poet best known on the Continent in the early seventeenth century were never printed in England. Elizabeth Jane Weston is nowadays completely ignored by literary histories; but in her day, she was widely celebrated and earned for herself the sobriquet ‘the Maid of England.'” — J.W. Binns, Intellectual Culture in Elizabethan and Jacobean England: The Latin Writings of the Age (Leeds, 1990), p. 111. ❧ ❧ Parthenicôn Elisabethæ Ioannæ Westoniæ, virginis nobilissimæ, poëtriæ florentissimæ, linguarum plurimarum pertissimæ, liber I-[III] operâ ac studio G. Mart. à Baldhoven … collectus; & nunc denuò amicis desiderantibus communicatus.Pragæ: Typis Pauli Sessij, [ca. 1606]. Call number (EX) PA8595.W452 P3.

Fore-edge painting • Ravensworth Castle • Gateshead-on-Tyne


Now in ruins, Ravensworth Castle in County Durham was for several centuries the seat of the Liddell family. ❧ This painting decorates the fore-edge of a 32 cm tall copy of the Carmina of Horace printed in Strasbourg in 1788. Judging from the build-out depicted, this painting likely dates from the second quarter of the 19th century. ❧ This copy also has the armorial bookplate of Ravensworth Castle (Franks 18291). Call number PTT 2865.1788.2q.

Over-wrap • early 19th century American binding repair


            
Binding reinforced and / or repaired with an over-wrap. Partially removed subscription or circulating library label suggests this copy endured regular use.
❧ Foster, Hannah Webster, 1759-1840. The Coquette; or, The History of Eliza Wharton; a Novel; Founded on Fact. Boston, Printed by Samuel Etheridge, 1797. Call number: (Ex) PS744.F7 C6 1797. [This copy also has a early handwritten listing identifying the actual names for the three principal characters.]

Virgil • 1529

Bucolica Virgilij cum commento familiari. (This title above a woodcut of Virgil, his patron Pollio, and his patron’s son Saloninus. This scene is framed by four rectangular ornaments in the lower one of which is Caxton’s device.) Colophon: Impressa Londini in jedibus VVinandi de VVorde. Annno (sic) domini M.CCCCC. xxix. ad calculum Romanum. xij. die Martij. Call number: VRG 2945.325.029. Citation: ESTC S95695

This is item 1094 in Bernard Quaritch (Firm).
A Catalogue of books in English history and literature from the earliest times to the end of the seventeenth century
(1922)

Quaritch.cat.Eng.Hist.item.1094

Berthold’s Political Handkerchief • 1831

handkerchief.jpg
Berthold’s Political Handkerchief.
No. 1. London, Monday, September 5, 1831.

Henry Berthold led the National Union of Working Classes, aiming at universal male suffrage. He printed his newspaper on cotton to evade the government tax on paper.

“To the Boys of Lancashire. We have no patent for this new pocket handkerchief, because we intend to advocate the interest of the working people, and consequently do not intend to pay any tax for our knowledge to the tyranny that oppresses us. You shall be all as busy as bees if our Whig Taxers do not, by the omnipotence of an Act of Parliament, declare cotton to be a paper, and a handkerchief to be a pamphlet or a newspaper.” ….
… “Cotton For Ever!
Cotton makes very bad paper, as we may see in all that comes from the United States of America; but when finely woven, it is a very pretty thing to print on. See of how much more worth is our news, than that which is printed on paper, as to the fabric on which it is printed. Paper is torn and wasted; but a piece of printed cotton may be read and then used for a thousand different purposes. It is possible, if the ink will wash out, that after six months reading, we may be able to buy back and use over the cotton again. We shall perform wonders with cotton. Truly, knowledge is spiritual and will pervade every thing. Knowledge is power. It makes everything minister to its purposes. What shape will the Whig despotism take to reach us? It is spiritual also; a black spirit. Our spiritualism is from the angels of light, who are clothed in white cotton garments. Every letter is breeched and show us only its face, which may be more appropriately termed the sooty face divine, than that humanity may boast of its human fall divine.” (p. 3)

Berthold’s Political Handkerchief. No. 1, London, Monday, September, 5, 1831. 4 p. ; 44 x 29 cm. Printed on cotton cloth. Binding note: Ex copy: In recessed and padded white cardboard portfolio, in bluish gray cloth clamshell box (51 x 35 cm.). Call number:
(Ex) Oversize 2011-0015E

Rowlandson illustrates Tom Jones

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Illustration by Thomas Rowlandson for Tom Jones published in Edinburgh by James Sibbald in 1791, volume 1, page 55: Caption: Partridge cruelly accused and maltreated by his Wife & co. [Alternate caption: The astonished Partridge meets the vengeance of the whole sex.] ❧ The Library has long had the 1792 reissue of the sheets of James Sibbald’s 1791 Edinburgh edition. Recently acquired is the 1791 original. Each volume has four plates by Thomas Rowlandson. ❧ Fielding, Henry, 1707-1754. The History of Tom Jones, a foundling. By Henry Fielding, Esq. Edinburgh: printed by and for J. Sibbald, 1791. 3v.,plates; 8⁰. Call number (Ex) 2011-0440N.

Vandermaelen Atlas (1827) • First atlas of the world with all maps on the same scale

With funding from the Rare Book Division, the Friends of the Library, and the Historic Maps Collection, in March 2009, the Library acquired a copy of the Philippe Vandermaelen, Atlas universel de géographie physique, politique, statistique et minéralogique . . . (Brussels, 1827), consisting of approximately 380 folio foldout sheets of maps and 40 pages of statistical tables. This is the first atlas to have been printed using lithography; it is also the first to show the whole world in maps using a uniform scale (about 26 miles to the inch).

The atlas was digitally photographed at high resolution in 2010, and is now available in two forms: in the Princeton University Digital Library [link] and on a stand-alone website, which includes a video showing a virtual rotating globe constructed from the Vandermaelen continental maps: the world as it was mapped in 1827 [link].

Bookplate of Sir Edward Bysshe


Anonymous armorial bookplate of Sir Edward Bysshe (1615-1679).
Arms: Bysshe and Clare, quarterly dimidiated, impaling Green. Sir Edward Bysshe, Garter King of Arms, married Margaret, daughter of John Green of Boyshall, co. Essex; died 1679. Motto: Prudens Simplicitas.

Egerton Castle, in his English Book-Plates (London, 1893; p. 52) categorizes this plate as of the Carolian style, dates it to 1655, and describes it as “an indented, cusped and slightly scrolled shield, encompassed by palms tied together, wreath-like, by ribbands that interlace with the motto scroll, the whole contained within a line frame.” He illustrates it on p. [49].

This exemplar (11 x 6 cm) is mounted on the recto of front free endpaper facing the titlepage of Sir William D’Avenant (1606-1668), Gondibert: an Heroick Poem, London, Printed by Tho. Newcomb for John Holden, and are to be sold at his Shop at the sign of the Anchor in the New-Exchange, 1651. Call number: RHT 17th-149

Monkey Island, Illustrated •1839

“This beautiful and romantic islet is situated in the most picturesque part of the Thames, between the Willows and Maidenhead Bridge; it is the favored resort of aquatic parties in the vicinity of Windsor, and is a delightful resting place for those bound to Cliefden, Henley, or Marlow – the woodland beauty of the scenery being unrivalled on the banks of ‘Thames winding stream’. The (third) Duke of Marlborough selected this sequestered spot for the enjoyment of Isaac Walton’s “gentle art”, and embellished it by the erection of two elegant buildings – a pavilion and a temple. The former is decorated by finely-executed paintings of monkeys, in various grotesque and humorous characters (which, with the pavilion, are represented by the drawings), and continue to prove an attraction to the curious…. it is asserted that the whole cost the Duke of Marlborough £12,000. It was purchased by H. Townly Ward, Esq., and is now the property of P.C. Bruce, Esq., of Taplow. The tout ensemble presents an imposing idea of aristocratic grandeur and magnificence.”

Preface to Monkey Island, Illustrated, by a series of Humorous Figures and a View of the Pavilion. From original sketched by M. Penley, drawn on the new patent zinc plates by T. Fairland. Dedicated to the Young Gentlemen of Eton College. Windsor: published by J.B. Brown … ca. 1839. This copy inscribed on front wrapper: “Robert H.J. Heygate from his brothers Frederick & William Heygate, March 28, 1839.” Call number: (Ex) Item 6473315

Trade label: Jacob Kops in Hamburgh bij der mueren.

All kinds of East Indian cottons and Dutch linen cambric, linen goods [or linen drapery], calico [or muslin] and white-linen tape for sale: in Hamburg by the wall, at Jacob Kops. [Woodcut prospect of Haarlem above this text.]

[Transcription]
Allerhande ostindische Cattoennen und
hollandisch linwant Camertuch weijs-zweern [i.e. Weisswaren?]
Kattuen und weijslinnen-bant Zu Kauf: in
Hamburgh bij der mueren. bij Jacob Kops.

One of more than 536 trade labels, chiefly for the linen thread trade, pasted into three albums with title Houtsneden door Izaak van der Vinne [Woodcuts by Isaac van der Vinne (1665-1740)]. Call number: (Ex) NC1002.L3 V56f [This label: volume 2, leaf 19.]

Sixteen Humourous Designs • ca. 1840

“Thereupon Marcus Curtius, … mounted on a horse caparisoned with all possible splendour, he plunged fully armed into the gulf” Livy, The History of Rome, Book 7, Chapter 6, illustrated in Sixteen Humourous Designs, to Illustrate Virgil, Horace, and Livy. With Mottoes in Latin and English. For Private Circulation Only. [(England), n.p., n.d., c. 1840]. Call number: (Ex) 2009-0431Q

“One of the finest covers of the early Victorian period” – Ruari McLean

Recently added to the Robert F. Metzdorf Collection of Victorian Bookbindings :

Thomas Moore, Irish Melodies, (London: Longman & Co., 1846). Call number: ExMe 3864.9.349.13.

In his Victorian Publishers’ Book-Bindings in Paper, Ruari McLean captions this book “Gift Books From Longman … Cream paper on bevelled boards, printed in green and gold on upper, spine, and lower. Note the skillful introduction of the title into the circle round the illustration. One of the finest covers of the early Victorian period, probably designed by Owen Jones. …”[ p. 30 (London: Gordon Fraser, 1983)]. McLean illustrates the lower side of the cover on p. 13.

Original 18th century circulating library wrappers



George Buchanan (1506-1582). The History of Scotland, from the Earliest Accounts of that Nation, to the Reign of King James VI. translated from the Latin of George Buchanan. In two volumes. Edinburgh: Printed by A. Donaldson and J. Reid. for Alex. Donaldson, 1762. Call number: (EX) Item 6427104. ❧
Provenance: Lot 279, sold at Bloomsbury Auctions (London), 14 December 2011. Also, in 1991, these were sold at Bloomsbury, June 13, 1991, lot 362, to Simon Finch. ❧ The British Library holds A Catalogue of Hargrove’s Circulating Library at Harrogate (York: W. Blanchard, 1801).

Earliest engraving of Nassau Hall • 1760

“Aula Nassovica.” Copperplate engraving, 3.75 x 6.25 inches. Artist and engraver unknown. Illustration opposite p. 104 of New American Magazine, No. XXVII (March 1760), Woodbridge, in New Jersey: Printed and sold by James Parker. Sold also at the new printing-office in Beaver-Street New-York, and by Thomas Coombs, in Front-Street, Philadelphia. Call number: (Ex) 0901.525 ❧ Link to larger file.

Dutch linen trade labels – 18th century

Wrappers for skeins of ‘nun’s thread’ – a “finer thread, called ounce or nun’s thread, from its having formerly been made by nuns in France and Flanders” (A.J. Warden, The Linen Trade, Ancient and Modern (1867), p. 539). Three examples from more than 536 trade labels, chiefly for the linen thread trade (both export and domestic) pasted into three albums with title Houtsneden door Izaak van der Vinne [Woodcuts by Isaac van der Vinne (1665-1740)]. Call number: (Ex) NC1002.L3 V56f [These wrappers: volume 1, leaf 16.]

Ream wrapper • 18th century Dutch

Ream wrapper for ‘fine’ (fyn = fijn) grade paper made by Lubertus van Gerrevink. ❧ W.A. Churchill, Watermarks in paper in Holland, England, France, etc. in the XVII and XVIII centuries, (1935), p. 36 describes this as “Garden of Holland, lion alone” and dates his copy at 1749. This ream wrapper is one of more than 536 trade labels, chiefly for the linen thread trade, pasted into three albums with title Houtsneden door Izaak van der Vinne [Woodcuts by Isaac van der Vinne (1665-1740)]. Call number: (Ex) NC1002.L3 V56f [This wrapper: volume 3, leaf 8.]

Beatniffe’s Circulating Library, Norwich


Richard Beatniffe (Norwich, Norfolk) was active in the trade from 1763-1818 as bookseller, bookbinder, printer, music seller, and, during the 1770s, as owner of a circulating library. This label appears on the front pastedown of each volume of The History of Sir William Harrington Written Some Years since [by Thomas Hull] ; and Revised and Corrected by the late Mr. Richardson. London : Printed for J. Bell, at his extensive Circulating Library near Exeter-Exchange in the Strand, and C. Etherington at York, 1771. Call number: (Ex) 3792.95.3455 1771.
❧ Earlier in 2012, the Library added a collection of 21 books from early English circulating libraries. Searching the phrase “Libraries, Subscription” in the main catalog returns records for these new additions together with more than 40 others already in the collections. Also searching the phrase “Library copies (Provenance)” returns more than 70 entries, many for books once in a circulating library.

Presentation to Johann Martin, Freiherr von und zu Aichelburg

Stamped in silver on front cover: “Dem Wolgebornen Herrn, Herrn Johann Martin Freyherrn von und zu Aichelberg, Herrn auf Zassenegg, und Rodenhoffen, einer löbl. Laa. alda deren Lands-Vochten, und Landshauptman[n]ischen Verhören Beysitzern, &c Meinem gnädigen Herrn, Herrn zu einem glückseeligen Neuen Jahr 1732″

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[Almanach und Progosticon] [n.p., 1731?]
Text includes table of chronology, almanack, bloodletting table, prognosticon, and “Natur-und-Kunst Curiositäten Calendar.” Call number: (Ex)AY851.N37
[Transcription courtesy of Mark Farrell, senior cataloguer]

Bookplate of Johann Christian Georg Bodenschatz (1717-1797)


Bookplate of Johann Christian Georg Bodenschatz (1717-1797), German Protestant theologian. Dated both by engraving and in ink “An: 1738.” In his copy of three works by Johannes Leusden (1624-1699) bound together: Philologus Hebræus : continens quæstiones Hebraicas, quæ circa Vetus Testamentum Hebræum fere moveri solent Ultrajecti [Utrecht] : Ex officinâ Francisci Halma, 1686. [with] Philologus Hebræo-Græcus generalis : continens quæstiones Hebr[a]eo-Gr[a]ecas, quæ circa Novum Test. Græcum fere moveri solent Lugduni Batavorum [Leyden] : Apud Jordanum Luchtmans, 1685 [with] Philologus Hebraeo-mixtus : unà cum spicilegio philologico, continente decem quæstionum & positionum præcipuè philologico-Hebraicarum & Judaicarum centurias Ultrajecti [Utrecht] : Ex officinâ Francisci Halma … , 1682.
Call number (EX) 2005-0401N. The book’s owner immediately prior to Bodenschatz was Gustav Georg Zeltner (1672-1738). Both front and back endpapers have early handwritten extensive notes in Hebrew and Latin.

Rat-Catcher warns Book-pirates • 1768

N.B. If any Persons shall Reprint this Book, or offer to Pirate it, they will be Prosecuted according to law, it being entered in Stationers-Hall. ❧
The Universal Directory for Taking Alive and Destroying Rats, and All Other Kinds of Four-footed and Winged Vermin, In a Method Hitherto Unattempted: Calculated for the Use of the Gentleman, the Farmer, and the Warrener. By Robert Smith, Rat-Catcher to the Princess Amelia. London: printed for the author, 1768. Call number: (Ex)SB993.S64 ❧

Prize binding • 1826

Stamped in gilt on front cover: “Ecole Royale Gratuite de Dessin Année 1826 Premier Prix Annuel Remporté par Antoine Louis Huet.”
❧ Gaspard Monge (1746-1818). Géométrie descriptive: 4. éd., augm. d’une théorie des ombres et de la perspective, extraite des papiers de l’auteur par M. Brisson.
(Paris: V. Courcier, 1820). Call number: (Ex) QA501 .M74 1820.

Concert in Vauxhall Gardens • ca. 1800

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Leaf preceding title-page of New and complete instructions for the hautboy : containing the easiest & most improv’d rules for learners to play : to which is added a favorite collection of airs, marches, minuets, duets, &c. also the favorite rondo performed at Vauxhall by Mr. Fischer. London : Printed & sold at A. Bland & Wellers Music Warehouse … , [1800?] Call number (EX) MT362 .N38 1800q ❧ Scene depicts a concert in Vauxhall Gardens, London. The plate also served as an advertisement for A. Bland & Weller, Piano Forte Makers, No. 23 Oxford Street.

First map depicting only New Jersey to be printed and published in America • 1784

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“State of New Jersey” map (58.5 x 28.5 cm) facing verso of final printed leaf of The Petitions and Memorials of the Proprietors of West and East-Jersey, to the Legislature of New-Jersey New-York: Printed by Shepard Kollock, no. 156, Water-Street., [1784] Call number: Ex 1174.271.2 c.1. Copy with ownership signatures of John Rutherfurd (1760-1840), who compiled the text of Petitions and Memorials.
❧ Joseph J. Felcone in his New Jersey Books 1698-1800 (1992) covers the publishing history of this book (entry 22). He states “It is the first map depicting only New Jersey to be printed and published in America.” Alas, the identity of the mapmaker is not known, but there is evidence to suggest it was John Hills. As of 1991, the original copper plate survived and owned by Howard Sereda of Edison, NJ.

The Mysterious Mother


Horace Walpole (1717-1797). The Mysterious Mother: a tragedy by the Hon. Horace Walpole (Late Lord Orford); with the Author’s Postscript. London : Printed by A. Macpherson, Russell Court, for Ann Lemoine, White-Rose Court, Coleman Street, and J. Roe, No. 90, Houndsditch, [1802]. Call number: TC023, box 163. ❧ Only other copies recorded are those at the National Library of Wales. ❧ Provenance: ThX copy has the autograph signature of E. Nason–possibly Edwin F. Nason–a New York publisher in the latter half of the 19th century. Nason identifies this copy on the t.p. as ”rare,” one that he ”ordered from London 1860.” At the bottom of the t.p., Nason notes: ”this the only copy I have seen in this country.” The latter note, in addition to an internal note about the writing of The Mysterious Mother, are both signed ”E.N.” ❧ Internal notations in ink and pencil signal that this book was accessioned by a library in 1892 and had come from Samuel Putnam Avery. This evidence plus the genre of the publication suggest that this book was once part of the Brander Matthews Dramatic Museum, dispersed by the Columbia University Library, and from which Princeton received parts in 1971. ❧ (This impartment from rare book cataloger Scott Carlisle.)

14,000 and counting: “Bound in the Vellum manner”

On front paste-down of An account of the constitution and present state of Great Britain, published in London by John Newbery

“The Purchasers of Books bound in the Vellum manner are desired to observe that they are sewed much better than the Books which are bound in Leather; open easier at the Back, and are not so liable to warp in being read. If by any Accident the Covers should be stained or rubbed they may be new covered for a Penny, an advantage that can not be remedied in Leather ; so that this method of Binding is not only cheaper but it is
presumed will be found more useful.
    The only Motive for trying this Experiment was to adopt a Substitute for Leather which was greatly enhanced in its Price, either by an increased Consumption, or of Monopoly; how far that purpose will be answered, must be submitted to the Determination of the Reader.
    In the course of five Years, upwards of Fourteen Thousand Volumes have been sold bound in this Manner, and not One Hundred of them have been returned to be new covered; a sufficient Proof of its Utility and the Approbation of the Public.

       St. Paul’s Churchyard, Sept. 22, 1774.

An account of the constitution and present state of Great Britain, together with a view of its trade, policy, and interest, respecting other nations & of the principal curiosities of Great Britain and Ireland. London, Printed for Newbery and Carnan [177-?]. Call number (EX) DA620 .A5 1770z ❧


Palace of Wisdom • ca. 1680

“Tabula VII” of a suite of 17th century engravings graphically representing contemporary science and philosophy. In addition to both historic and allegorical figures there are a number of renderings of scientific instruments: barometers, thermometers, clocks, scales, hygrometers and chemical apparatuses.
Palatium sapientiae. Parisiis: Apud Stephanum Gantrel Via Jacobea sub signo Sti. Mauri, [ca. 1680]. 26 plates including engraved title-page. Call number: (EX) 2011-0248Q

Title labels

“Several alternative schemes for labeling fore-edges were devised by seventeenth century librarians, including the pasting on of paper tabs or labels, attached to either the boards or one of the leaves, carrying shelf numbers or titles.” – David Pearson, English Bookbinding Styles, 1450-1800: A Handbook (London, 2005), p. 107.





Castle Forbes Library

Books from this library were sold in London on 21st July 1993. See: Sotheby’s (Firm) The Library of the Rt. Hon. the Earl of Granard:extracted from Castle Forbes, County Longford … (London, 1993).

Left: Bookplate of Castle Forbes Library • Right: Anonymous armorial bookplate of
George Forbes, 6th Earl of Grannard (1760-1837) [Arms. Forbes impaling Rawdon. In 1779, he married Selina Frances, daughter of John 1st Earl of Moira] Franks 10892.


Crest of George Forbes, 6th Earl of Grannard (1760-1837). For further details see
British Armorial Bindings: http://armorial.library.utoronto.ca/stamp-owners/FOR001 • Other marks of ownership for this library are illustrated in the sale catalogue. ❧ ❧ Sources of these examples: Gay, Sophie, 1776-1852. Laure d’Estell par Mme. ***. Paris: Ch. Pougens, an X (1802). Call number (EX) PQ2260.G25 L38 • Minutes of evidence taken before the Committee for privileges, on the Earl of Berkeley’s pedigree, in the year 1799. (London) 1811. Call number (Ex) Item 6375489q.

The Heldenrüstkammer of Archduke Ferdinand II in Schloss Ambras



“A catalogue of the Heldenrüstkammer of Archduke Ferdinand II in Schloss Ambras, the first collection of armour formed for historical reasons in the first purpose-built museum North of the Alps.” The work illustrates 125 suits of armor, one per plate. Its full title runs to 133 words. What follows is a rendering of just the first portion of the full title: “Most true images of the most august emperors, the most serene kings and archdukes, of the most illustrious princes, as well as earls, barons, nobles, and other eminent men, who were either the commanding leaders in war or within their realms performed admirably…[together with] succinct descriptions [of their achievements].” (Sometimes this work is referred to as the “Armamentarium Heroicum,” Latinizing the German for “Heroes Armory.”)
❧ This tour-de-force of Baroque illustration was complied by Jakob Schrenk von Notzing with plates believed to be by the engraver Dominicus Custos. The book was published in Innsbruck in 1601. This date in the Princeton copy has been revised by means of a handstamp to read “M.DC.XIX.” The Library’s copy is bound in contemporary calf and is stamped with the name and arms of its first owner: Hector Le Breton, seigneur de la Doineterie, who held public offices during the reigns of Henri IV, Louis XIII, and Louis XIV. In 1615 he succeeded his cousin as roi d’armes de France.
❧ Call number; (Ex) D106 .S3f. Purchased in 1983 from Robin Halwas (antiquarian bookseller, London; his catalogue 3, number 79).
❧ Cf. Elisabeth Scheicher, “Historiography and Display: The Heldenrustkammer of Archduke Ferdinand II in Schloss Ambras.” Journal of the History of Collections 2 (1990): 69-79.

17th century armorial binding and contemporary slip case


Figure 1
❧ The figures explained: Armorial binding covering
Ogier Ghislin de Busbecq, Legationis Turcicae epistolae quatuor.
Frankfurt, A. Wechels Erben, C. de Marne et J. Aubry 1595. Call number (Ex) 1789.229.13.

J. Basil Oldham in Shrewsbury School Library Bindings (Oxford, 1943) notes the following regarding one such book bound for Ramiro de Guzmán, Duque de Medina de las Torres (ca. 1600-1668): On both covers there is a “narrow border formed by a simple conventional foliage roll, with a foliage ornament in each angle; in centre, an heraldic stamp 96×75 mm; a shield, surrounded with the following letters in circles CGDDMMAHPPMIGPCLA, and surmounted by a coronet under which is a scroll bearing the letters FEI. On the upper cover: arms: two coats impaled: Dexter (arms of Felipe Ramirez de Guzman, Duke of Medina de las Torres, Marquis of Torrel): Two caldrons checky with snakes issuing therefrom, flanked in saltire by ten ermine-tails (5 and 5), within a bordure gobony of Castile and Leon; Sinister (arms of Anna Caraffa, Duchess of Sabbioneta, Mondragone and Trajetto, Princess of Stigliano): Quarterly of six (two in chief and four in base): 1. Per fesse (a) three bars (Caraffa) and (b) a band counter-embattled between six stars (Aldobrandini); 2. a cross patty between four eagles crowned, and over all an escutcheon quarterly of three bars and a lion rampant (Gonzaga); 3. four pallets (Aragon); 4. per fesse a castle (Castile) and a lion (Leon); 5. four pallets flanked in saltire by two eagles crowned (Sicily); 6. a column ensigned by a crown (Colonna). On the lower cover: arms (unidentified): Upon a terrace in base, a plant growing between reeds or tufts of grass; in chief an arched band inscribed REVOLUTA FOECUNDANT, with, beneath it, and ranged in the same manner, three rows of stars.”
Ramiro de Guzmán’s arms impale those of his second wife, “Anna Caraffa, daughter of Antonio Caraffa, Duke of Mondragone, and Elena Aldobrandini. He had previously married Marie de Guzman, daughter of Gaspar de Guzman, Count of Olivares, Philip IV’s minister, to whose titles, through his marriage, he succeeded on Olivares’ death in 1645, for which reason he used the acrologic inscription round the shields which Olivares had used as an adjunct to his armorial insignia. The letters (C and G being transposed towards the end) stand for: ‘Comitatui grandatum ducatum ducatum marchionatum marchionatum arcis hispalensis perpetuam praefecturam magnam Indiarum chancellariatum primam Guzmanorum lineam addidit.’ The letters FEI stand for: ‘Fortuna etiam invidente.’
As the owner of the book would not be likely to use the boastful inscription of his father-in-law until he had, by the latter’s death, succeeded to his titles, the book was probably not bound till after 1645, and in Spain, not Naples, because by that time the owner had ceased to be Viceroy of Naples. A larger variant of these heraldic stamps is found on some books.” (p. 120-121; Shrewsbury School Library example illustrated on plate XXVI)
❧ Figure 2 • Two inscriptions on titlepage:
Alongside right margin, “[Guil.] Godophin” [See a comparable example at the University of Pennsylvania.] This is the signature of English diplomat, Sir William Godophin (1634?-1696) •
At bottom:”Ex libris bibliothecae Domus S[anct]ae. M[ari]ae M[ontium] Piorum Operariorum” From the library of the Congreation of the Pii Operarii, a group of religious founded at Naples in 1602.For comparable provenances, see exemplars at Cambridge University Libraryand at
Universitats de Catalunya.]
❧ Figure 3 • A remarkable survival • 17th / 18th century slip case custom made for this book. Why would such a case have been made? Perhaps to protect the book during travel — Busbecq’s Turkish Letters provided important detailed information about the Ottoman state and were highly prized (and still are.)

Figure 2 (above) ❧ Figure 3 (below)

Grace Talbot Cavendish

Lady Grace was the youngest daughter of George Talbot, 6th Earl of Shrewsbury. Recent scholarship gives 1562 as her birth year and ‘after 1625′ for her death. She was married in 1567 (sic!) to Henry Cavendish, eldest son of Bess of Hardwick and Sir William Cavendish. It was Bess who proposed the marriage as precondition to her taking the Earl as her fourth husband. ❧ This copy was also once owned by Richard Heber. It is listed as item 336 in A Catalogue of Heber’s Collection of Early English Poetry (London, 1834).
❧ George Chapman, 1559?-1634.Andromeda liberata. Or the nuptials of Perseus and Andromeda. London, : printed for Laurence L’Isle …, 1614..
Call number (EX) 3672.6.312.

P.T. Barnum receives The Philosopher’s Stone

❧ Upper cover is folded toward the front, in order to be used for mail­ing this copy to a recip­i­ent; it has been addressed in ink: ”P. T. Bar­num Esqr. Amer­i­can Museum New York”; below the address are the words ”By Steam Liv­er­pool June 1.” (the year ‘‘1850’’ is writ­ten in graphite beside the num­ber 1).
In the cor­ner of the folded sheet is the book­sellers’ label of T.H. Lacy, used as the return address. At an unknown time, someone removed the postage stamp at right.

In addi­tion, this copy has two marks of own­er­ship on the t.p.: the ink stamp of the William Sey­mour The­atre Col­lec­tion and a note in graphite, which reads: ”Very good of the kind, but not of our class.” It is not known whether the note was writ­ten by Bar­num him­self.

Taylor, Tom, 1817-1880.
The philosopher’s stone : an entirely new and original satirical and politico-economical Whitsun morality, extremely serious and very comical / by the author of Diogenes, The vicar of Wakefield, &c., &c.
London : T.H. Lacy, 17, Wellington Street, Strand, [between 1849 and 1857]
Call number (THX) TC023 Box 156a

Series: Lacy’s acting edition ; 14
Notes: Libretto only.
T.H. Lacy was located at 17 Wellington Street, Strand from 1849 until 1857. In 1857 he moved to larger premises at 89 Strand. Cf. Oxford dictionary of national biography.
“First produced at the New Strand Theatre, Monday, May 20th, 1850″–T.p. verso.
Includes titles of airs (popular and borrowed) to be sung.
Includes cast list.

Text supplied by rare book cataloger, Scott Carlisle.


Armorial Bookplate: William Trumbull, Esqr.

Armorial bookplate of William Trumbull, Esqr. [Franks 29899].
❧ Sir William Trumbull (1639–1716), civil lawyer, held numerous offices, such as ambassador to France (1685-6), to Turkey (1687-91), Lord of the Treasury, Secretary of State to King William III. For his service in Parliament see the online History of Parliament (entry1 and entry2).

His books were consigned to auction by the 8th Marquess of Downshire (d. 2004; obit.). The dispersal of the Trumbull books, extracted from Easthampstead estate, near Bracknell, was distributed across six sales, during 1990 and 1991, as follows:
❧ 1. Atlases, travel and natural history … : days of sale: Thursday 21st June 1990 …, Friday 22nd June 1990 …; Sotheby’s …, 34-35 New Bond Street, London. … the Property of the Most Honourable the Marquess of Downshire: Lots scattered throughout. Cf. lots 356, 360-63, 365-67. ❧ ❧ 2. English Literature and History: Including Books from the Library of the … Marquess of Downshire, Thursday 19th July 1990 .. Sotheby’s …, 34-35 New Bond Street, London. Lots 29-36, 47-50, 358-60, 381-95 [30 lots]. ❧ ❧ 3. Books and maps : Sotheby’s London [sale held during four days] 22nd-23rd October 5th – 6th November 1990. On the fourth day of sale: Tuesday 6th November 1990 lots 965-1232 were sold. These included “The Property of the Most Honourable the Marquess of Downshire Various Subjects including Science and Medicine,” Lots 910-964 [54 lots]. ❧ ❧ 4. Continental and Russian books and manuscripts, science and medicine … : day of sale: Tuesday 20th November 1990 …; Sotheby’s …, 34-35 New Bond Street, London. … the Property of the Most Honourable the Marquess of Downshire: Lots 223-227, 329-332 [9 lots]. ❧ ❧ 5. English literature and history … : Thursday 13th December 1990 …; Sotheby’s …, 34-35 New Bond Street, London. … the Property of the Most Honourable the Marquess of Downshire: Lots scattered throughout, e.g. 353. ❧ ❧ 6. Printed books and maps: 5. and 19. February 1991. Sotheby’s … London. …. the Property of the Most Honourable the Marquess of Downshire: Lots 687-762 [75 lots].


Bookplate in: John Kersey, Title: The Elements of that Mathematical Art Commonly called Algebra, Expounded in Four Books. London, Printed by W. Godbid, for T. Passinger and B. Hurlock, 1673-1674. Call number (Ex) QA33 .K4 1674q. (Sotheby’s, London, Feb. 19, 1991, lot 727).

Bookstamp: Bibliothèque de Tsarskoe Selo

In 1938, the Library purchased from New York bookseller Maurice Sloog “more than 600 volumes of early nineteenth century fiction … from the Imperial Library at Tsarskoe-Selo. Most of the books have the stamp of the Imperial Library, and some bear the bookplate of Alexander III. Another plate with the words “Bibliothèque de Tsarkoe-Selo” indicates that the books came from that section of the private library of Nicholas II which was housed in the Alexander Palace.” Further particulars given in the following article, here quoted above: Albert E. McVitty, Jr. ’32 “Books from Tsarskoe-Selo, Nineteenth Century French Novels, Bearing Imperial Bookplates, Now at Princeton” in the Princeton Alumni Weekly XXXVIII, 27 (April 15, 1938), pp. 1-2. ❧ News of the accession also published in The New York Times, May 10, 1938 [link to article]

❧ Example above on half title of Bantysh-Kamenskīĭ, D. N. (Dmitrīĭ Nikolaevich), 1788-1850. Siècle de Pierre-le-Grand; ou, Actions et hauts faits des capitaines et des ministres qui se sont illustrés sous le règne de cet empereur; tr. du russe … par un officier russe, avec des remarques explicatives du traducteur … A Moscou, S. Selivanovsky, 1822. Call number (EX) 1627.168.144 vol. 1.

Trade custom of pre-dating

“The Rule in general observed among Printers is, that when a Book happens not to be ready for publication before November, the date of the ensuing year is used.” — John Nichols, Literary Anecdotes (London, 1812) iii, p. 249n. According to Philip Gaskell, Nichols is describing 18th century practice. Evidently the custom dated somewhat earlier as per this example.

Narcissus Luttrell corrected the imprint date in his copy of Francis Manning’s Panegyrick (London: Printed for J. Weld, 1698.) Call number: (Ex)3598.999q vol. 64, no. 4.