Q&A: Brazil’s president was impeached. Now what?

Brazil’s Senate voted last week to impeach President Dilma Rousseff, a move that suspends the president for 180 days. Rousseff, who is accused of using public bank money to cover budget gaps, now faces an impeachment trial. The suspended president is calling the situation a “coup d’etat” and maintains she didn’t act criminally regarding budgetary affairs.

The impeachment raises significant questions for Brazil’s economic and political future. John Londregan, professor of politics and international affairs, answered questions about these issues and how they will affect Brazil going forward.

Londregan, a faculty associate at the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics, is a specialist in the development and application of statistical methods in political science. He also studies politics in South America, with a particular focus on Chilean legislative and electoral politics. Read more

Senior thesis: Exploring the emergence of Cuban consumerism

Senior Thesis Dennisse Calles

Dennisse Calle found the topic for her senior thesis along a Havana street, in the back of a stall that sells pirated movies and music.

Cubans pay the equivalent of a few dollars, insert a flash drive into the computer at the back of the stall, and get access to El Paquete — a weekly, one terabyte compilation of popular TV shows, movies, music, computer and phone apps, and advertisements that serves as an offline Netflix, YouTube, Craigslist and more in a country where Internet access is slow and expensive. Read more

Price explores Cuban literature and culture in ‘Planet/Cuba’

Rachel PriceRachel Price, an associate professor of Spanish and Portuguese who is also affiliated with the Program in Media and Modernity, joined Princeton in 2009. Her scholarship focuses on Latin American, Caribbean and particularly Cuban literature and culture; media; poetics; empire; and ecocriticism. Her essays have explored a range of topics including digital media, slavery, poetics and visual art. This semester she is teaching an undergraduate course, “El Género Negro: Crime Fiction,” in Spanish, and a graduate course, “Narrative Prose in Latin America — Finance and Form.”

In her new book, “Planet/Cuba” (2015, Verso Books), Price addresses contemporary literature as well as conceptual, digital and visual art from Cuba that engages questions of environmental crisis, new media and new forms of labor and leisure.  Read more

A Taste of Cuba

The Vedado neighborhood of Havana after a thunderstorm. Poor drainage often left streets flooded.

Olivia Adechi ’16The Vedado neighborhood of Havana after a thunderstorm. Poor drainage often left streets flooded.

By Mark F. Bernstein ’83

Some things are universal: The first day of class is awkward, particularly at a new school, and it pays to break the ice. As Johannes Hallermeier ’16 discovered, this is no less true in Cuba than it is anywhere else.

Hallermeier was sitting with a handful of Princeton students and a dozen Cubans in a class on the history of Latin American thought at the University of Havana last February, as part of a revised and expanded study-abroad program. While they waited for the professor, the students kept to themselves — shuffling papers, playing with pens, staring silently at their wooden desks. As a rule, Hallermeier would learn, Cubans are friendly and outgoing people, but today, probably because of first-day nervousness, everyone avoided eye contact. It did not bode well for an engaging semester.

Read more…

Program in Latin American Studies (PLAS) Visiting Fellowships, 2016-2017

 Program in Latin American Studies (PLAS) Visiting Fellowships, 2016-2017

Job Title: Visiting Research Scholar — Requisition Number: 1500588
Deadline: October 15, 2015, 11:59 p.m. EST

The Program in Latin American Studies is launching an open call for applications for the 2016-2017 visiting fellowships. We are looking for top scholars in their field who have teaching experience and will provide Princeton students with a unique opportunity to study topics that are not regularly offered at Princeton. Applications will be accepted from outstanding scholars in the humanities and social sciences, as well as from established writers, artists, filmmakers, or architects working on projects relating to Latin America who are stellar teachers. For 2016-2017, we are particularly interested in candidates working in the following fields:

1) Cuban history, culture, and literature
2) Latin American architecture

Fellows will be appointed for either one or two semesters during the academic year, 2016-2017 (fall semester: September 1, 2016-January 31, 2017; spring semester: February 1-June 30, 2017). The Office of the Dean of the Faculty determines salary on the basis of current academic rank and award duration; appointment rank at Princeton is determined on the basis of experience and current institutional affiliation.

How to Apply
Application deadline is October 15, 2015, 11:59 p.m. EST. All candidates must use the online application process to submit materials and apply online at: http://jobs.princeton.edu.

1) A cover letter indicating the applicant’s proposed length of stay (1-2 semesters), title of the proposed research project, and teaching interests;
2) A curriculum vitae (in English);
3) One undergraduate seminar proposal (or syllabus) for each proposed semester of the fellowship, including a statement of how this course(s) would enhance undergraduate education at Princeton;
4) A four-five page statement describing the research project and its scholarly contribution;
5) The names of three (3) referees (the Program will contact them, if needed, at a later date).

Fellows may teach one undergraduate course per semester, conditional upon sufficient enrollments and approval of a Princeton department and the Dean of the Faculty; and participate in PLAS-related events on campus.

Required Qualifications: Advanced degree preferred.


Princeton University is an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

Seniors win Labouisse Prize for projects in Colombia, Himalayas

Two Princeton University seniors have been awarded the Henry Richardson Labouisse ’26 Prize to spend one year pursuing international civic engagement projects after graduation. The $30,000 prize will support a project by Yessica Martinez in Colombia and Damaris Miller in Nepal and India.

The award to Martinez will help her use poetry to empower a community in her native Colombia that faces a moment of transition and change. Miller’s award will assist her work to assess the environmental efforts of monasteries and help the institutions’ residents identify ways to increase their environmental sustainability.

Read more.

Congratulations Yessica Martinez and Jake Robertson!

Photos by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications

Photos by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications

Princeton seniors Yessica Martinez and Jake Robertson have been named co-winners of the University’s 2015 Moses Taylor Pyne Honor Prize, the highest general distinction conferred on an undergraduate.
They will be recognized at a luncheon during Alumni Day on campus Saturday, Feb. 21.

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Les Discours du Pince-Gueule (1966)

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“I would like to share with all of you that the Library’s Graphic Arts Collection recently acquired the artist book Les Discours du Pince-Gueule (1966), a beautiful collaborative piece between Julio Cortázar and the artist Julio Silva.  Along with the book, we were also fortunate to acquire many of the drawings and proofs that led to the 1966 limited edition, as well as several albums of photographs of Silva and Cortázar by photographers Pierre Boulet, Colette Portal, Yan Voss, and by Cortázar himself.
To view selected images and read more about the acquisition, please see a posting by Julie Mellby, the Graphic Arts Curator, at https://graphicarts.princeton.edu/2014/12/01/julio-cortazar-and-julio-silva/.

This acquisition was possible thanks to the generous support of Stanley J. Stein, the Walter Samuel Carpenter III Professor in Spanish Civilization and Culture, Emeritus, in honor of Barbara H. Stein, Princeton University’s first bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal.  Thank you so much, Stan!”

-Fernando Acosta-Rodríguez

Rio de Janeiro’s newspaper praises Bruno Carvalho’s new book

Bruno Carvalho, professor em Princeton, acaba de criar novo epíteto para o Rio de Janeiro. Além de maravilhosa e partida, agora a cidade pode ser chamada de porosa, termo que propõe interpretação original para um velho problema: a coexistência de uma cultura/autoimagem definida pela mistura com a disparidade socioeconômica evidente/brutal. “Cidade porosa” é o título de seu livro publicado no final de 2013 pela editora da Universidade de Liverpool. Deveria ter tradução imediata, pois é leitura essencial para enfrentarmos melhor as transformações urbanísticas que vão se acelerar até as Olimpíadas. Precisamos escolher bem que rumo dar para nossa porosidade. Read more