Rio de Janeiro’s newspaper praises Bruno Carvalho’s new book

Bruno Carvalho, professor em Princeton, acaba de criar novo epíteto para o Rio de Janeiro. Além de maravilhosa e partida, agora a cidade pode ser chamada de porosa, termo que propõe interpretação original para um velho problema: a coexistência de uma cultura/autoimagem definida pela mistura com a disparidade socioeconômica evidente/brutal. “Cidade porosa” é o título de seu livro publicado no final de 2013 pela editora da Universidade de Liverpool. Deveria ter tradução imediata, pois é leitura essencial para enfrentarmos melhor as transformações urbanísticas que vão se acelerar até as Olimpíadas. Precisamos escolher bem que rumo dar para nossa porosidade. Read more

Diamela Eltit Papers, 1943-2012, at Princeton University Library

C1457_Bx5_F12_Diamela_Eltit001It is a pleasure to announce that the Manuscripts Division of the Princeton University Library has recently added the papers of Diamela Eltit to its extensive collection of archives of Latin American writers and intellectuals.
Eltit, a highly regarded experimental writer who wrote her first two novels, Lumpérica (1983) and Por la patria (1986), during the years of the Pinochet dictatorship in her native Chile, also gained notoriety through her participation in the Colectivo de Acciones de Arte (CADA), a group of artists who staged art actions to challenge the dictatorship.  Since then she published several others highly acclaimed literary works including El cuarto mundo (1988), El padre mío (1989), Vaca sagrada (1991), El infarto del alma (1994), Los vigilantes (1994), Los trabajadores de la muerte (1998), Mano de obra (2002), Puño y letra (2005), Jamás el fuego nunca (2007), Impuesto a la carne (2010), and Fuerzas especiales (2013).  Eltit served as a cultural attaché during Patricio Aylwin’s government at the Chilean Embassy in Mexico City, and has also held positions as writer-in-residence at Brown University, Washington University in St. Louis, Columbia University, UC Berkeley, the University of Virginia, Stanford University and Johns Hopkins University. She is currently a Distinguished Global Professor of Creative Writing in Spanish at New York University.
Her papers consist of manuscripts, typescript drafts and notebooks related to both published and unpublished works.  In addition, there is a sizeable amount of correspondence from writers, colleagues, family and friends (access to the correspondence is temporarily restricted), as well numerous photographs of Eltit with family, friends, and various literary and political figures.
A still in process finding aid is available here.  Feel free to contact me or the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections for additional information.

PLAS concentrator Peter Smith Featured in “Zoom in: 28 stories of a global summer”

In this interactive feature, you will be able to view a map of the world and take a global journey with more than two dozen Princeton students who engaged in a broad range of academic study, independent research, internships and civic engagement projects in summer 2013.

More than 1,300 undergraduate and graduate students traveled throughout the United States and to 90 countries last summer. Students are already making plans for summer 2014 programs, attending open houses and learning about application requirements and deadlines.

“One of the greatest opportunities offered to Princeton students is the chance to have a significant educational experience abroad — or immersed in another culture,” said Diana Davies, vice provost for international initiatives.

Explore the interactive map!

Environmental Challenges, Urban Solutions

2014 – 2015 New Investigator Award

At the beginning of the 20th century, approximately 10% of the world’s population lived in cities; today, more than half of the world’s dwellers live in urbanized areas. Recent studies indicate that compact cities are significantly more energy-efficient than sprawling suburbs. As societies of the so-called Global South continue to urbanize at a rapid pace, it is more than ever urgent to examine ways in which cities can present viable models for sustainable development.

Recent disasters – earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, etc. – have served as painful reminders that human-made environments and natural forces are in constant interaction. These relationships often occur in less visible or self-evident ways: the encroachment of agriculture into rain forests in South America is tied to demands from urban markets; the water and waste management of metropolitan areas depends on intricate infrastructures that often remain opaque to urban dwellers, while they impact regional ecosystems; car dependent suburbanites living in tree-lined streets of single family houses often produce a heavier carbon footprint than residents of dense and polluted inner cities, relying on mass transportation systems.

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Video feature: The Teaching Museum

The Princeton University Art Museum since its founding in the late 1800s has aimed to provide students with exposure to original works of art and to teach the history of art through the many objects they have from around the world. Princeton University faculty members use objects in the museum as teaching tools to give students a deeper understanding of ancient cultures and people.

Last semester, Christina Halperin, then a Cotsen Fellow in Latin American Studies and now a lecturer in the art and archaeology department, taught a course titled “Mesoamerican Material Culture.” In this video, students in the course study ancient Maya artifacts in the museum and then reproduce Mesoamerican pottery techniques in the Wilson College Ceramics Studio on campus.

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Class snapshot: ‘Health and the Social Markers of Difference’

Description: This new course examines the role of social markers of difference — such as race, class, nationality and gender — in issues of global health. For example: How can racial or gender discrimination affect access to health services and life expectancy? “Studying health paired with markers of difference lets us address the social and political determinants of vulnerability and disease,” said João Biehl, the Susan Dod Brown Professor of Anthropology, who helped develop the course. “It is somewhere in the middle of social lives that the work of critique always begins, and we need integrated approaches that recognize the profound interdependence of health, economic development, good governance and human rights,” said Biehl, who is also co-director of the Program in Global Health and Health Policy.

Instructors: Peter Locke, a lecturer in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Lilia Moritz Schwarcz, a professor of anthropology at the University of São Paulo (USP) and a Princeton Global Scholar; Laura Moutinho, a professor of anthropology at USP; José Ricardo Ayres, a professor of preventative medicine at USP; and Didier Fassin, the James D. Wolfensohn Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study. “Collaborating with our colleagues from the University of São Paulo has affirmed how essential it can be to explore complex issues from the vantage point of different intellectual traditions and social and historical contexts,” Locke said. “As we constructed the syllabus, the faculty from USP challenged us to broaden our sense of what materials could be relevant and to bring literatures and scholarly debates produced in other parts of the world into an equal conversation with our own bodies of knowledge.”

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Student Trip to Guatemala – December 2012

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During December 2012 five Princeton undergraduate students enrolled in LAS 401 Latin American Studies: The Politics of Ethnicity in Latin America traveled to Guatemala.  This trip, led by Professor Timothy J. Smith (Visiting Research Scholar in PLAS and Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology and PLAS), was sponsored with the generous support of PLAS, the Department of Anthropology and the Fred Fox Fund.  Continue reading