“Kurly” protein keeps cilia moving, oriented in the right direction (Cell Reports)

By Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research A new study of a protein found in cilia – the hair-like projections on the cell surface – may help explain how genetic defects in cilia play a role in developmental abnormalities, kidney disease and a number of other disorders. The researchers at Princeton University and … Continue reading “Kurly” protein keeps cilia moving, oriented in the right direction (Cell Reports)

Study reveals mechanism behind enzyme that tags unneeded DNA (Nature Chem. Bio.)

By Tien Nguyen, Department of Chemistry Researchers have discovered the two-step process that activates an essential human enzyme, called Suv39h1, which is responsible for organizing large portions of the DNA found in every living cell. For any particular cell, such as a skin or brain cell, much of this genetic information is extraneous and must … Continue reading Study reveals mechanism behind enzyme that tags unneeded DNA (Nature Chem. Bio.)

Antibiotic’s killer strategy revealed (PNAS)

By Tien Nguyen, Department of Chemistry Using a special profiling technique, scientists at Princeton have determined the mechanism of action of a potent antibiotic, known as tropodithietic acid (TDA), leading them to uncover its hidden ability as a potential anticancer agent. TDA is produced by marine bacteria belonging to the roseobacter family, which exist in … Continue reading Antibiotic’s killer strategy revealed (PNAS)

Fruit flies adjust their courtship song based on distance (Neuron)

A fly runs on an air-supported ball. The audio traces of the fly's courtship song are shown. Article courtesy of Joseph Caputo, Cell Press Outside of humans, the ability to adjust the intensity of acoustic signals with distance has only been identified in songbirds. Research published February 3 in Neuron now demonstrates that the male … Continue reading Fruit flies adjust their courtship song based on distance (Neuron)