Come together: Nucleolus forms via combination of active and passive processes

https://youtu.be/DxYDy1fQlV8?rel=0 Movie caption: Researchers at Princeton studied the temperature dependence of the formation of the nucleolus, a cellular organelle. The movie shows the nuclei of intact fly cells as they are subjected to temperature changes in the surrounding fluid. As the temperature is shifted from low to high, the spontaneously assembled proteins dissolve, as can … Continue reading Come together: Nucleolus forms via combination of active and passive processes

Same immune-system proteins may first giveth, then taketh away motor control (Brain, Behavior, and Immunity)

By Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications Princeton University researchers have found that a family of proteins with important roles in the immune system may be responsible for fine-tuning a person's motor control as they grow — and for their gradual loss of muscle function as they age. The research potentially reveals a biological cause of … Continue reading Same immune-system proteins may first giveth, then taketh away motor control (Brain, Behavior, and Immunity)

Study reveals mechanism behind enzyme that tags unneeded DNA (Nature Chem. Bio.)

By Tien Nguyen, Department of Chemistry Researchers have discovered the two-step process that activates an essential human enzyme, called Suv39h1, which is responsible for organizing large portions of the DNA found in every living cell. For any particular cell, such as a skin or brain cell, much of this genetic information is extraneous and must … Continue reading Study reveals mechanism behind enzyme that tags unneeded DNA (Nature Chem. Bio.)