How rabies virus moves through nerve cells, and how it might be stopped

Cells in red against black background

To successfully infect its host, the rabies virus must move from the nerve ending to the nerve cell body where it can replicate. In a study published July 20 in the journal PLoS Pathogens, researchers from Princeton University reveal that the rabies virus moves differently compared to other neuron-invading viruses and that its journey can … Continue reading How rabies virus moves through nerve cells, and how it might be stopped

Genetically engineered mice could boost fight against aggressive hepatitis

Article provided by the Department of Molecular Biology Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) causes the most aggressive form of viral hepatitis in humans, putting at least 20 million people worldwide at risk of developing liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. Efforts to develop effective treatments against HDV have been hampered by the fact that laboratory mice … Continue reading Genetically engineered mice could boost fight against aggressive hepatitis

Genetic instructions from mom set the pattern for embryonic development

Micrograph of a zebrafish organ called the Kupffer's vesicle

By the Department of Molecular Biology A new study indicates an essential role for a maternally inherited gene in embryonic development. The study found that zebrafish that failed to inherit specific genetic instructions from mom developed fatal defects earlier in development, even if the fish could make their own version of the gene. The study … Continue reading Genetic instructions from mom set the pattern for embryonic development

Researchers find an alternative mode of bacterial quorum sensing

By the Department of Molecular Biology Whether growing in a puddle of dirty water or inside the human body, large groups of bacteria must coordinate their behavior to perform essential tasks that they would not be able to carry out individually. Bacteria achieve this coordination through a process called quorum sensing in which the microorganisms … Continue reading Researchers find an alternative mode of bacterial quorum sensing

An immune signaling pathway for control of Yellow Fever Virus infection

By the Department of Molecular Biology Princeton University researchers have uncovered a critical role for a new immune signaling pathway in controlling infection by the flavivirus Yellow Fever Virus (YFV).  The paper describing this discovery was published today in the journal mBio. Infection with YFV causes a devastating illness with a mortality rate of up … Continue reading An immune signaling pathway for control of Yellow Fever Virus infection

‘Acidic patch’ regulates access to genetic information

Histone image

By Pooja Makhijani for the Department of Chemistry Chromatin remodelers — protein machines that pack and unpack chromatin, the tightly wound DNA-protein complex in cell nuclei — are essential and powerful regulators for critical cellular processes, such as replication, recombination and gene transcription and repression. In a new study published Aug. 2 in the journal Nature, … Continue reading ‘Acidic patch’ regulates access to genetic information

Princeton researchers report new system to study chronic hepatitis B

By the Department of Molecular Biology Scientists from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have successfully tested a cell-culture system that will allow researchers to perform laboratory-based studies of long-term hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. The technique, which is described in a paper published July 25 in the journal Nature Communications, will aid the study … Continue reading Princeton researchers report new system to study chronic hepatitis B

How TPX2 helps microtubules branch out

By Staff, Department of Molecular Biology A new study has revealed insights into how new microtubules branch from the sides of existing ones. Researchers at Princeton University investigated proteins that control the formation of the thin, hollow tubes, which play an essential role in cellular structure and cell division. In a study published in the … Continue reading How TPX2 helps microtubules branch out

Study reveals the multitasking secrets of an RNA-binding protein

By Staff, Department of Molecular Biology Researchers from Princeton University and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences have discovered how a fruit fly protein binds and regulates two different types of RNA target sequence. The study, published April 4 in the journal Cell Reports, may help explain how various RNA-binding proteins, many of which … Continue reading Study reveals the multitasking secrets of an RNA-binding protein

Researchers develop technique to track yellow fever virus replication

By Staff, Department of Molecular Biology Researchers from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have developed a new method that can precisely track the replication of yellow fever virus in individual host immune cells. The technique, which is described in a paper published March 14 in the journal Nature Communications, could aid the development of … Continue reading Researchers develop technique to track yellow fever virus replication