How rabies virus moves through nerve cells, and how it might be stopped

Cells in red against black background

To successfully infect its host, the rabies virus must move from the nerve ending to the nerve cell body where it can replicate. In a study published July 20 in the journal PLoS Pathogens, researchers from Princeton University reveal that the rabies virus moves differently compared to other neuron-invading viruses and that its journey can … Continue reading How rabies virus moves through nerve cells, and how it might be stopped

An immune signaling pathway for control of Yellow Fever Virus infection

By the Department of Molecular Biology Princeton University researchers have uncovered a critical role for a new immune signaling pathway in controlling infection by the flavivirus Yellow Fever Virus (YFV).  The paper describing this discovery was published today in the journal mBio. Infection with YFV causes a devastating illness with a mortality rate of up … Continue reading An immune signaling pathway for control of Yellow Fever Virus infection

‘Acidic patch’ regulates access to genetic information

Histone image

By Pooja Makhijani for the Department of Chemistry Chromatin remodelers — protein machines that pack and unpack chromatin, the tightly wound DNA-protein complex in cell nuclei — are essential and powerful regulators for critical cellular processes, such as replication, recombination and gene transcription and repression. In a new study published Aug. 2 in the journal Nature, … Continue reading ‘Acidic patch’ regulates access to genetic information

Princeton researchers report new system to study chronic hepatitis B

By the Department of Molecular Biology Scientists from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have successfully tested a cell-culture system that will allow researchers to perform laboratory-based studies of long-term hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. The technique, which is described in a paper published July 25 in the journal Nature Communications, will aid the study … Continue reading Princeton researchers report new system to study chronic hepatitis B

How TPX2 helps microtubules branch out

By Staff, Department of Molecular Biology A new study has revealed insights into how new microtubules branch from the sides of existing ones. Researchers at Princeton University investigated proteins that control the formation of the thin, hollow tubes, which play an essential role in cellular structure and cell division. In a study published in the … Continue reading How TPX2 helps microtubules branch out

Come together: Nucleolus forms via combination of active and passive processes

https://youtu.be/DxYDy1fQlV8?rel=0 Movie caption: Researchers at Princeton studied the temperature dependence of the formation of the nucleolus, a cellular organelle. The movie shows the nuclei of intact fly cells as they are subjected to temperature changes in the surrounding fluid. As the temperature is shifted from low to high, the spontaneously assembled proteins dissolve, as can … Continue reading Come together: Nucleolus forms via combination of active and passive processes