Come together: Nucleolus forms via combination of active and passive processes

https://youtu.be/DxYDy1fQlV8?rel=0 Movie caption: Researchers at Princeton studied the temperature dependence of the formation of the nucleolus, a cellular organelle. The movie shows the nuclei of intact fly cells as they are subjected to temperature changes in the surrounding fluid. As the temperature is shifted from low to high, the spontaneously assembled proteins dissolve, as can … Continue reading Come together: Nucleolus forms via combination of active and passive processes

Researchers propose surveillance system for Zika virus and other infectious diseases (The Lancet)

By Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research A group of prominent researchers from seven institutions including Princeton University are calling for the establishment of a worldwide program to collect and test blood and other human bodily fluids to aid in the study and prevention of emerging infectious diseases such as the mosquito-borne Zika … Continue reading Researchers propose surveillance system for Zika virus and other infectious diseases (The Lancet)

Dolphin-disease outbreak shows how to account for the unknown when tracking epidemics (Journal of the Royal Society Interface)

By Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications Stopping the outbreak of a disease hinges on a wealth of data such as what makes a suitable host and how a pathogen spreads. But gathering these data can be difficult for diseases in remote areas of the world, or for epidemics involving wild animals. A new study led … Continue reading Dolphin-disease outbreak shows how to account for the unknown when tracking epidemics (Journal of the Royal Society Interface)

Conservation versus innovation in the fight against antibiotic resistance (Science)

"Antibiotic resistance is a problem of managing an open-access resource, such as fisheries or oil," writes Ramanan Laxminarayan, a research scholar at Princeton University and the director of the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy in Washington, D. C., in today's issue of the journal Science. He goes on to say that individuals have … Continue reading Conservation versus innovation in the fight against antibiotic resistance (Science)

Study resolves controversy over nitrogen’s ocean “exit strategies” (Science)

By Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research A decades-long debate over how nitrogen is removed from the ocean may now be settled by new findings from researchers at Princeton University and their collaborators at the University of Washington. The debate centers on how nitrogen — one of the most important food sources for … Continue reading Study resolves controversy over nitrogen’s ocean “exit strategies” (Science)

A more potent greenhouse gas than CO2, methane emissions will leap as Earth warms (Nature)

By Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications While carbon dioxide is typically painted as the bad boy of greenhouse gases, methane is roughly 30 times more potent as a heat-trapping gas. New research in the journal Nature indicates that for each degree that the Earth's temperature rises, the amount of methane entering the atmosphere from microorganisms … Continue reading A more potent greenhouse gas than CO2, methane emissions will leap as Earth warms (Nature)

Migrating animals add new depth to how the ocean “breathes” (Nature Geoscience)

By Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications The oxygen content of the ocean may be subject to frequent ups and downs in a very literal sense — that is, in the form of the numerous sea creatures that dine near the surface at night then submerge into the safety of deeper, darker waters at daybreak. Research … Continue reading Migrating animals add new depth to how the ocean “breathes” (Nature Geoscience)

How do bacteria clog medical devices? Very quickly. (PNAS)

A new study has examined how bacteria clog medical devices, and the result isn't pretty. The microbes join to create slimy ribbons that tangle and trap other passing bacteria, creating a full blockage in a startlingly short period of time. The finding could help shape strategies for preventing clogging of devices such as stents — … Continue reading How do bacteria clog medical devices? Very quickly. (PNAS)

Nursing gerbils unravel benefit of multiple mothers in collective mammals (Mammalian Biology)

By Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications In mammals such as rodents that raise their young as a group, infants will nurse from their mother as well as other females, a dynamic known as allosuckling. Ecologists have long hypothesized that allosuckling lets newborns stockpile antibodies to various diseases, but the experimental proof has been lacking until … Continue reading Nursing gerbils unravel benefit of multiple mothers in collective mammals (Mammalian Biology)

The implications of “self-boosting” vaccines on herd immunity

Researchers use mathematical models to consider the implications of "self-boosting" vaccines—a class of emerging vaccines that can establish long-term intermittent antigen presentation within a host—on herd immunity. "Self-boosting vaccines and their implications for herd immunity" by Nimalan Arinaminpathy, et al. 10.1073/pnas.1209683109 Read the abstract