PIIRS Global Seminar in Havana, Cuba: A User’s Guide to Cuba’s Transition

For the first time, the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS) will be hosting a Global Seminar in Havana this summer. Offered entirely in Spanish, the six-week course will explore how writers, artists and filmmakers have used their media to examine the changes in many aspects of Cuban society: the economy, race relations, sexual minorities, freedom of speech, political models, the legacy of communism, among others. The program will be based in Havana and will include one weekend trip to Trinidad, one of the most important ports in Cuban history.

The faculty director is Rubén Gallo is the Walter S. Carpenter Jr., Professor in Language, Literature and Civilization of Spain as well as a Professor of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Cultures.

The seminar fulfills the Social Analysis (SA) requirement and the requirements for the certificate in Latin American Studies.

Final costs are still being calculated, but will range between $6,500-$8,000, inclusive of airfare, accommodations and spending money. As soon as exact costs are finalized, they will be posted on the website and application.

Learn more about the seminar.

Apply now

Please direct any questions to the seminar’s program manager, Nikki Woolward, who can be reached by email or by calling 609-258-8873.

Former Google CEO Schmidt, Peru President Kuczynski to receive top alumni awards

Princeton University will present its top honors for alumni to Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Alphabet Inc., and Pedro Pablo Kuczynski, president of Peru.

Schmidt, a member of the Class of 1976, will receive the Woodrow Wilson Award. Kuczynski, who earned a Master in Public Affairs in 1961 from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, will receive the James Madison Medal. They will receive the awards and deliver addresses on campus during Alumni Day activities on Saturday, Feb. 25. Read more

The Met Fifth Avenue: Architectural Models from the Ancient Americas

The Met Fifth Avenue: Architectural Models from the Ancient Americas

Exhibition Overview

From the first millennium B.C. until the arrival of Europeans in the 16th century, artists from the ancient Americas created small-scale architectural models to be placed in the tombs of important individuals. These works in stone, ceramic, wood, and metal range from highly abstracted, minimalist representations of temples and houses to elaborate architectural complexes populated with figures. Such miniature structures were critical components in funerary practice and beliefs about an afterlife, and they convey a rich sense of ancient ritual as well as the daily lives of the Aztecs, the Incas, and their predecessors. Read More

PLAS Senior Thesis Prize Nominees

Stanley J. Stein Senior Thesis Prize

The Stanley J. Stein prize is awarded by PLAS each year to the student who writes the best senior thesis on a Latin American-related topic.

Helena Michelle Hengelbrok, Anthropology
Water Belongs to Those Who are Thirsty: An Ethnography of Water, Health, and Political Belonging in Urubamba, Peru

Seth Merkin Morokoff, Economics
The Impact of Brazil’s Bolsa Familia on Child Labor Supply Effects by Age and Employment Sector

Oliver A. Quintero, Woodrow Wilson School
An Analysis of Interest Group Influence on U.S.-Cuba Trade Policy

Andrea Rodriguez Gallego, Woodrow Wilson School
Returns of Hugo Chavez’s Bolivarian Missions in Venezuela

Abdiel Santiago, Politics
In the Shadow of the Stars and Stripes an Experimental Analysis on the Manufacturing of Support for Puerto Rican Statehood

Jamie Lee Shenk, History
Where Were You When They Killed Lara Bonilla? Politics of Drugs and Peace in Colombia (1982-1984)

Zachary Willhelm Wall, History
Islands of Insanity U.S. Intervention in Brazil and the Dominican Republic, 1964-1966

Melody Zhang Qui, Woodrow Wilson School
To Push or to Cut? Decision-Making in Childbirth Amid the Brazilian Cesarean Epidemic

Kenneth Maxwell Senior Thesis Prize in Brazilian and Portuguese Studies

The Kenneth Maxwell prize is awarded by PLAS on behalf of Firestone Library to the student who writes the best senior thesis related to Brazil.

Mary Ann Ferguson McNulty, Woodrow Wilson School
When Environmental and Social Crisis Collide: Problems in the Periphery are Center State in the São Paulo Water Crisis

Seth Merkin Morokoff, Economics
The Impact of Brazil’s Bolsa Familia on Child Labor Supply Effects by Age and Employment Sector

Paul H. von Autenried, Jr., Politics
Cross-national Analysis of Positive Action Programs and their Social, Political and Economic Origins: Identity and Ethnic Preferences for Three Marginalized Peoples across Twenty-one States

Zachary Willhelm Wall, History
Islands of Insanity U.S. Intervention in Brazil and the Dominican Republic, 1964-1 6

Melody Zhang Qiu, Woodrow Wilson School
To Push or to Cut? Decision-Making in Childbirth Amid the Brazilian Cesarean Epidemic

Q&A: Does the ‘Hispanic Paradox’ still exist?

Latinos in the United States typically live longer than whites — a phenomenon commonly referred to as the “Hispanic Paradox” or “Latino Mortality Advantage.”

While not totally understood, these epidemiological findings have interested scholars, mostly because Latinos, on average, have lower socioeconomic status than whites. This is typically associated with higher death rates and worse health outcomes.

Good health at the start of migration, lower rates of smoking and strong social networks are some of the reasons researchers believe Latinos have an edge over their white counterparts in the United States.

But current health trends suggest the gap between U.S. Latinos and whites may soon be shrinking, according to Princeton University research, which points to higher obesity rates, higher incidence of diabetes, and significant disability issues as potential downfalls for Latinos. While Latinos still smoke less than whites in the United States, this may not be enough to counteract the other negative health trends.

Study author Noreen Goldman, the Hughes-Rogers Professor of Demography and Public Affairs, recently answered questions about her research. Her findings were published in Research on Aging, an academic journal.  Read More